Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
SuperCycles: The New Econ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

SuperCycles: The New Economic Force Transforming Global Markets and Investment Strategy Hardcover – February 4, 2010

3.7 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$27.95
$5.00 $0.01

Security
ITPro.TV Video Training
Take advantage of IT courses online anywhere, anytime with ITPro.TV. Learn more.
$27.95 FREE Shipping. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Arun Motianey worked for Citigroup from 1987- 2008. His positions included managing director and head of macro research and strategy in the company’s Global Wealth Management division.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education; 1 edition (February 4, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071637370
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071637374
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,269,492 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Hildreth Noronha on January 29, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most of us been affected in some way by this recent economic crisis, and there could not be many who have not spent some time thinking about how this whole damn mess came about. And just when we thought it was over, and the pundits on CNBC were talking about a V-shaped recovery, we hear the economy is slipping down the slope again! So this book "SuperCycles" (which I first heard about when I read and enjoyed the author's long article on the Roubini Global Economics website) got me really interested because his solutions seemed to be a radical departure from what we hear about every day.
First, an important disclosure. I've had the book for just a few days and I've skimmed it quickly and then gone back to read the sections that caught my attention. The best way to read this sort of the book is to read it carefully because it is heavy with concepts - and these concepts build on the ones that came earlier. Since not many of us have the time to devote a whole week to a single book, I would suggest that the reader focus on the Introduction, Chapters 1, 2 3, 6, 7 and 8. Some of the chapters in the middle of the book that deal with the Gold Standard would appeal only to history buffs. The last chapter is on investment ideas for the three scenarios (deflation and two types of inflation) and would be of maximum interest to the general reader but to be quite honest you won't get that much out of it if you haven't understood how the Supercycle works and why the author believes that policymakers are going to be faced with nothing but really terrible choices. The two Appendixes, both quite long, can be omitted by most.
Is Motianey's thesis convincing?
Read more ›
3 Comments 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The author warns us early on that we will be reading a major against-the-consensus view of why the global economy ran into trouble, and why we will struggle hard to get out of it. In the Introduction, he tells us that when the time came to write this book, everything he learned at Citigroup (where he held a senior research and strategy position), had to be thrown out the window because "they rationalize the industry's own feral behavior in herding investor capital into and out of these markets." This resonated well with me - as a retired Foreign Service Officer, I have seen the power of vested interests (and the damage it can do) all around the world. This mother of all financial busts began back here in the good old USA. Like many, I remain puzzled as to why only a handful of incompetent banks bear the blame.

Those hankering for a screed that would dump on the financial sector or the Washington political class will be disappointed. This is a serious work of analysis, written with a great amount of literary flourish. Although the reader can sense the author's outrage at various stages in the book his targets are not specific individuals, companies or countries. Motianey's conclusion is that the financial meltdown was an intellectual failure of the highest order - and until that is recognized and corrected we will remain thrashing around in the morass.

Happily, he does offer us a ray of hope at the end. Using the framework of the Supercycle, he points the way out, but on the basis of accepting much higher inflation than the central banks would wish. He worries that the need to encourage inflation will clash with the central bankers' need to stay true to everything they have been taught is right. Major ideological battles lie ahead for all central banks, including the Fed.
Read more ›
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Economics is not subject to causality. If prices go up demand tends to decline. It's never a certainty. The attempt to base market action on Newtonian like rules is doomed to failure. There are enough weasel words like "generally" to show that Motianey is ambivalent about what he writes. By necessity, a book that purports to treat market analysis as science must ignore behavioral economics.

The book is good on economic history, with an introduction to the concept of Kondriatev wave cycles. There's reference to classical theories of Smith, Mill, Keynes and others. He gives Friedman pretty short shrift. Especially interesting is the introduction to the contrarian ideas of Minsky and Koo in the appendix. The analysis of which equities perform best under which economic conditions might prove useful.

Starting with Chapter 4, this is worth reading.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This author never delivers on the title of his book. He gives only a bare bones description of the SuperCycle and never gives data to explain its length, severity, or timing.

The only data he presents to base his major thesis on is a single, two line, time series graph showing prices for manufactured goods and commodities. He claims he is writing for the general reader but fails to even explain the terms used in the graph, i.e. MVU and GYCPI. His basic thesis is that there is a long wave business cycle triggered by declining prices in the raw commodity segment of the international economy. These price declines move up the supply chain and eventually cause oversupply of consumer goods, cutbacks, and depression.

The author barely discusses key concepts that affect his thesis like tariffs, wages, or the fact that the growing service sector is labor intensive and uses very few commodity based inputs. He has fallen love with certain words (Fordism, ontological, intertemporal, falsify) and seems to use them whenever he can’t think of anything useful to write.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

SuperCycles: The New Economic Force Transforming Global Markets and Investment Strategy
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: SuperCycles: The New Economic Force Transforming Global Markets and Investment Strategy