Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Suspicion Nation: The Inside Story of the Trayvon Martin Injustice and Why We Continue to Repeat It
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on December 1, 2015
It took me a year to read this book! Not because it was difficult or my busy schedule. It took me so long because it was so full of troubling, thought-provoking prose. "'Whites commit crimes. Blacks are criminals.'" That is an example of Ms. Block's expertise. I am a civil attorney. Her description of the trial and the jurors, and national community sentiment were masterful. It is a difficult book to read because it requires total engagement. I think it is one of the most interesting books I have recently read.
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on August 30, 2015
I somewhat followed this trial and was totally dumb-founded by the outcome. I also don't think a true and honest conversation can happen by pretending that race does not matter. It is the elephant in the middle room. The book stated statistics and pertinent information about the topic of race that I believe is helpful to all who truly want to evaluate how they truly feel about who they are and how they view others. We cannot move from point A to point B on racial issues by pretending we, as a Nation, do not have a problem. There is an absolute problem, and it will not go away by acting as though there is not one at all.
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on March 19, 2014
After having watch the Zimmerman trial I was very interested in this book. As usual, Lisa Bloom does not disappoint! But this book is so much more than about the Zimmerman trial! It is a fabulous book about the race relations in America today, and it's so well put that I am making my friends read it! I tried to explain the situations to one friend, but I couldn't articulate it properly. She would just go back to pointing out how there are so many more African American criminals in jail, and I just couldn't get her to understand it's because they are targeted by police & get unfair sentences.
55 comments| 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on May 30, 2014
Mr Zimmerman was the victim of a thug. Unlike many victims, he was armed and able to defend himself. He was found not guilty in a fair trial. Obviously I watched a different trial than the author. I watched the same trial as the jury, and came to the same conclusion.
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on February 17, 2015
This book is defective in several ways, primarily the complete lack of objectivity. The author omits relevant facts such as the extent of Zimmerman's injuries. Meanwhile, she brings in irrelevant matters like Trayvon Martin's school record, which have nothing do with why Zimmerman shot Martin. It is highly unlikely that Lisa Bloom, who lives in Los Angeles, ever met Trayvon Martin or was on a first-name basis with him. Then, why does she keep calling him "Trayvon" but never refers to George Zimmerman as "George"? Because she's trying to personalize the deceased and depersonalize the accused. The author uses weak syntax, with stale cliches like "Stick a fork in him, he's done" and the vague passive voice "could be seen as a fabrication." "Could be seen as" by whom? This book could be seen by me as badly written by Lisa Bloom.
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on September 12, 2015
How can you write a book and ignore the (objective) witness number 6 - who testified at the trial? you got it wrong here.
Also you ignored Trayvon's past.
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on May 13, 2014
This is a highly biased, selective account of the evidence in a commonplace fatal encounter between two lowlifes. If the Martin-Zimmerman affair deserves a book, it would be to tell the sordid inside story of how it became a national issue through the efforts of shysters and the inaccurate characterizations, told by the relatives of the deceased to the national media. The latter refused, due to a feeling it would be politically incorrect, to investigate Trayvon Martin further. The role and reasoning of an elected prosecutor in deciding to press the case, despite the poor evidence of Zimmerman's legal guilt she had, is also something for a decent book.

Lisa Bloom, despite a Yale law degree, doesn't seem to understand the concept that guilt must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt. It had to be shown that it is unreasonable to believe that Zimmerman had a reasonable fear of great bodily harm or death if he didn't shoot Martin. She doesn't come within a light year of doing this. Her argument that Zimmerman didn't have such a reasonable fear is based almost entirely on a gesture that Zimmerman made in a video as to where his gun holster was. Other reviews have pointed out how absurd this argument is. So we are still waiting for a good book on the case.
88 comments| 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 1, 2015
Loved this book! If you have heard and/or followed the Trayon Martin case in Flordia but have only listened to the sound bites - this is the book to read. It really open my eyes and allowed me to ask questions about the "stand you ground" laws. Well worth the read.
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on March 31, 2014
In this utterly biased review of the case, Bloom ignores the most compelling forensic and eye witness evidence and bases her analysis on the testimony of Rachel Jeantel, Trayvon Martin's girlfriend. Jeantel was not even on the scene, but tried to interpret events that she heard on her cell phone. Bloom concludes that Zimmerman's head was not banged against concrete, the Zimmerman approached Martin with his gun drawn and ignores forensic evidence that Zimmerman was lying prone when he fired the fatal shot and that Martin was straddling him. It is obvious that Bloom started with the conclusion that she wanted and then manipulated the evidence to reach it. Pure tripe.
33 comments| 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 13, 2014
I heard about this book on a radio program and bought it right away. It is well written and to be honest parts of it upset me (the truth hurts). I think that anyone who enjoys a good crime and trial mystery will be pleased with this book.
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