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on March 15, 2012
My PC has a Netgear WG311T wireless card. My cheap Rosewill router is located one floor below, down a staircase through a thick concrete floor. I was getting 2 bars out of 5 (sometimes dropping altogether).

This TP-Link TL-ANT2408C attached perfectly to the external antenna connector on the Netgear WG311T.

After trying a couple of different locations, and pointing the antenna in all sorts of directions, I was able to tune in 4 bars out of 5. For the low price, and ease of installation, that's five stars in my book! Great buy!
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70 helpful votes
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on January 21, 2017
I have an Asus PCE-N13 wifi card. My office changed and my desktop got a new spot. The 2 antennas were between my huge tower and wall. The Internet speeds were abysmal. I was hoping that getting 2 of these external antennas would help. I'll let you decide if it worked or not!
Before:
1-5mbps Internet Speed Test
After
30-50mbps Internet Speed Test

So....yea it works! I must say that it may not make a difference for some people if your current antennas are not being blocked. Also, some people said the antennas were like 7-8 inches. They are actually 10.5+ inches. I love them. They were MUCH bigger than the antennas that came with my wifi card. I'd imagine that the size difference translates to better gain/reception.

The magnetic base is awesome. It feels like it has some weight to it, which means it won't topple over if you don't have it on a magnetic surface. I just stuck mine to the top of my computer. Seems to work great. I'm now getting even better speeds than my laptop was. I'm thrilled.

I know there were other brands and options for external bases and antennas, but I find that TP-Link is a VERY good brand and I always prefer to go with a brand that I know/trust.

All in all, $12 well spent ($24 total for 2).
1 helpful vote
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on August 20, 2017
We have a long 2 bedroom apartment. The master bedroom is at one end and our FIOS router is at the other. This antenna and careful channel selection on the router makes sure my Linux PC gets a solid signal. No issues with streaming services or OS updates. Much better that the puny antenna that came with the wifi card in the PC. Our apartment complex is not that dense but everyone seems to have wifi here. Using a wifi analysis app on my phone to find signal gaps for setting up the wifi channel helps.
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1 helpful vote
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on April 9, 2017
Since this was for my mother, and I haven't heard any complaints, it must be working as required. Her previous antenna barely gave any signal. This new one setup easily and picked up a much better signal. Considering her wifi is from an extender on our router across the street, it's great.
1 helpful vote
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on January 10, 2016
I installed two of these on my wireless modem in hopes that it would increase my signal distance. They made a very slight difference, but not enough to make the signal acceptable. My modem is connected to my desktop and about thirty feet away, and one interior wall in between, I have a problem getting a good wireless signal to my new laptop. I originally thought the issue was due to my 4 year old laptop, but with the purchase of a new up to date, faster laptop my wireless signal still stinks.

I have Verizon FIOS with 75/75 internet, and this was my result of changing to these antennas. Looks like I need to purchase a signal extender to get a good wireless signal on my laptop in a room just 30 feet away. It's always something. These constant technology changes and requirement drive me nuts. It seems that I still have to wait for downloads the same way I did when I had a 2400 baud dial up connection many, many, years ago.
Waiting for ads to load is a nightmare.
1 helpful vote
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on September 9, 2016
Exactly what I needed. It increased the range dramatically of my Verizon router for all of 15 bucks (I bought two). I was looking into buying verizon's repeater or range extender for close to $100, but I figured I would try this first. I'm glad I did, I can now get wifi everywhere in my house and even out on my back screened in porch. I would say it doubled the range of my wifi. The antenna took all of 15 seconds to replace. I highly recommend this if you want to increase the range of your wifi without breaking the bank.
***Note***- I purchased two of the direct mount antennas for my verizon router. No need for the extra coax model.
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on December 2, 2015
I bought one of the 8dBi "Desktop" (TL-ANT2408C) and one of the 8dBi "Non-Desktop" (TL-ANT2408CL) because one said it had a "RP-SMA Male" connector and the other said "RP-SMA Female" connector, and I wanted antennas that would fit a TP-LINK TL-WR843ND WiFi Router. The "Desktop" product includes the exact same antenna as the "Non-Desktop" (except it mysteriously doesn't have "TP-LINK" painted on it in white letters)... both have the exact same connector. What the "Desktop" product adds is a magnetic base with a connector on top for the antenna to screw into. Attached to the base is a cable with the same connector the antennas have.

The weird thing is apparently the industry-standard name for the connector on the Desktop antenna itself, the Desktop's base's cable, and the Non-Desktop antenna is "RP-SMA Male"... but TP-LINK inexplicably calls this connector "RP-SMA Female" on the packaging of the Non-Desktop antenna (the Desktop version says "Interfaces: RP-SMA Female", but that isn't clear whether the cable is RP-SMA Female or the cable plugs into [interfaces with] an RP-SMA Female socket).

The connector on a TL-WR843ND router, and on the top of the magnetic base, which either the antenna that comes with that base or the Non-Desktop antenna would screw onto, is what the industry calls "RP-SMA Female". There's a picture of a what the industry calls an RP-SMA Female connector at Wikipedia under "SMA connector" near the heading "Reverse Polarity SMA"... and this is NOT what TP-LINK is calling RP-SMA Female.

Confusing? Hopefully the attached photo of the Desktop 8dBi product shows the connectors clearly enough. The photo shows the antenna unscrewed from the base and laying beside it. As I said, the Non-Desktop 8dBi product is just the antenna shown in the photo.

Either 8dBi antenna works fine with a TL-WR843ND router, and the Desktop version can be used with the router either with or without the base (presumably you'll lose a lot of signal using the base, what with the cable and the extra connectors). As for results compared to the 5dBi antennas that come with the TL-WR843ND, I can't say. The signal is stronger for some WiFi spots in the vicinity with the 8dBi antennas, and stronger for others with the standard 5dBi antennas.
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on August 29, 2014
I have an office in a cottage adjacent to my house. I purchased a WiFi range extender to bring WiFi over there and the signal was adequate. I purchased this antenna hoping to improve the WiFi signal. Using WiFi analytic software (There is an excellent tool available for free from Amped Wireless, the manufacturer of my range extender at www.ampedwireless.com/wifianalytics) I could see absolutely no discernible difference in signal strength between this antenna and the small 4" antenna that came with the device.
I captured a screenshot with a graph depicting my WiFi signal over time during which I swap antennae. You can see a downward spike in the instance where I swapped antennae and then the signal resumes exactly the same. When I figure out how to post pictures to Amazon, I'll share.
Like so many things inexpensive these days, did I simply get the on-in-ten items that doesn't work out of the box? Who knows. It just seems like a roll of the dice any more.
2 helpful votes
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on September 5, 2015
Each of these antenna rods gives 8dBi performance, and 3 of these fitted to a TP-LINK TL-WDN4800 Dual Band Wireless N900 PCI Adapter bring in a solid signal and a connection speed of 130 Mbps. , which delivered speedtest dot net results of 93.21 Mbps (down) and 12.08 Mbps (up) behind a NETGEAR WNR3500L 2.4GHz Router -- through a cinder-block wall and a lot of machines, motors, and steel cabinets and furniture. Easy install -- 3 of these spread out in a "fan" pattern give a strong signal over a broad range.
UPDATE: When used with a TP-LINK AC1900 (Archer C9) Dual-Band Gigabit Router, Connection speeds improved from 130 Mbps to 300 Mbps.
I used the 8dBi antenna rods on both the TP-Link router and the TP-Link adapter for improved range and signal strength.
These TP-LINK 8dBi antenna rods give the best all-around performance of any antenna rods or devices that I have ever used in my 20 years of wireless computing.
Get 'em before they're gone !!
1 helpful vote
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Once I got this hooked up to my single-antenna 150mbps desktop PCI-e wireless card, I was able to get a consistent 3-4 bars while connected to my Belkin router, which is located on the other end of the house (an average sized house) and one floor down. That might not sound optimal by itself, but that same 3-4 bar connection maintains a constant 150mbps communication with said router, which is the maximum the adapter is capable of in the first place--I haven't yet checked my wireless connection and seen less than 150mbps in the connection speed (keeping in mind this only denotes connection speed between computer and router and does not account for the actual Internet download/upload speeds).

Like antenna replacements for most wireless cards, installation for this is as unscrewing one of the antennae and screwing this on in its place--it can be installed either directly or by a wire connected to its stand. I've been using it on its stand and it's working fine sitting on my desk. I couldn't tell you how this antenna will perform with higher-speed adapters, but it's working great for my own circumstances.

I should also mention that the magnets on the stand are quite strong. If you do happen to have a metal surface to attach it to (I'm wary of attaching it to my computer case and there's no point doing so to begin with since the antenna can screw right into the back of the computer if you want it to), it WILL hold fast and stay there, and takes some effort to remove. This isn't a refrigerator magnet we're talking about. Obviously how useful this is depends on what your individual setup looks like, though.
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