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Comment: A well-cared-for item that has seen limited use but remains in great condition. The item is complete, unmarked, and undamaged, but may show some limited signs of wear. Item works perfectly. Pages and dust cover are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine is undamaged.
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TRAIN GO SORRY: Inside a Deaf World Paperback – April 25, 1995

4.2 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Combining memoir and reportage, Cohen provides a sensitive, intimate portrait of a New York City school for the deaf and the issues facing the deaf community. Cohen is not deaf, but her father heads the Lexington School, and she grew up there. She tracks the progress of two students: Sofia, a Russian immigrant bravely learning a second sign language and a new American world; and ghetto-raised James, who finds stability after moving into the school dormitory. Cohen analyzes the fierce debates over mainstreaming the deaf, the value of oralism and whether new cochlear implants rob the deaf of their culture. She tenderly recalls her deaf grandparents, probes her father's dilemmas, reports on her frustrated romance with a deaf man and her work as an interpreter in a program for deaf adults at the City University of New York. She portrays sign language with wonderfully tactile prose--the word "silence," for example, is signed with "austere arcs." If Cohen's narrative is disjointed, her commitment and her descriptive gifts make her book memorable.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

YA-Cohen draws upon her experiences as the hearing grandchild of deaf immigrants to combine personal stories of hearing-impaired individuals with related aspects of deaf culture. Using her first home and her father's place of employment, the Lexington School for the Deaf in New York City, to connect characters and experiences, she shares tales of activities familiar to young adults-boring classes, the school play, selling ads for the yearbook, graduation. The only difference for these students is that they cannot hear and cannot speak the language of the hearing world. Through Cohen, readers share in the challenges, frustrations, fears, triumphs, and joys of achievement not only of these young people, but, through historical vignettes, of her grandparents as well. This perspective allows readers to determine how (or if) life has changed for the deaf in America. A careful reading of Train Go Sorry provides exposure to the urban poor and our country's many immigrants (both past and present), making this a resource suitable for sociology or history students interested in viewing the American melting pot through the eyes of a group of people with a silent past.
Janis Ansell, Tidewater Association Hearing Impaired Children (TAHIC), Virginia Beach, VA
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books; Reprint edition (April 25, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679761659
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679761655
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #161,519 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book. Leah Hager Cohen has managed to create a portrayal of the Deaf Community which is thought provoking and interesting. Anyone with a connection to the Deaf Community ought to read this book. Cohen comes from an extreme viewpoint of inclusion being wrong for the Deaf Community and Deaf children. However, in this book she is able to portray, in a passionate way, the importance of the Deaf Community for Deaf people without pushing her views on inclusion. Cohen creates an atmosphere of warmth and companionship within her text that speaks out in a louder voice than any argument on the street against inclusion
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Format: Paperback
This book is a personal overview and interpretation of several issues of concern in deaf education. The author, Leah Cohen, was born into a hearing family who worked and resided at Lexington School for the Deaf in New York City. In this book, she explores her connection to the school through the stories of her father's parents, who were both deaf, and her father, who was superintendent of the school when this book was being written. Cohen also looks at the school from the point of view of two students, Sofia Normatov and James Taylor. She describes some of the accomplishments these students have achieved despite tremendous challenges. Sofia was a recent immigrant from the USSR, and must learn ASL and English if she wants to go on to university. James hails from the housing projects and receives very little support from friends and family for his academic endeavors. Nevertheless, he is determined to pass the Regents Exam and earn an academic diploma so that he will have the opportunity to continue his education. Cohen also describes her own experiences learning sign language and then developing her skills as a translator. The book includes some black-and-white photos of the main characters described in the text. There is no index or bibliography.

Worked into the chapters telling stories about Lexington School, its students, and staff are many issues that are central to the deaf community today. One of these issues is the question of mainstreaming deaf children into public education. Many administrators (and hearing parents) believe that deaf children should be treated like other handicapped children and enrolled in regular classes in hearing schools. These people cannot seem to comprehend how misguided this policy is.
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By A Customer on April 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book. Once I started it I could not put it down. Leah Hagar Cohen described the school, the deaf students and their teachers, her family all so well that I felt like I was there with her walking down the school's corridors. I really felt like I got to know the people that she focused on and appreacited her sharing her own personal story about her contact with the deaf community.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is marvelous for its accurate insights into Deaf culture. It uses a Deaf residential school setting as the basis for the many subplots so we get an inside look at deaf people - It is an ingenious device. We see the various aspects of Deaf culture from many points of view as Ms. Cohen explores issues through the various characters in the book. All the characters are very interesting and fully drawn. You feel as though you know each one of them when you're done.

I am a hearing man who has been involved in the Deaf community for over 30 years. I teach ASL at a college and have read just about all the books available on Deaf culture. This is the book that I now require for my level two students. It gives so much "inside" information about deaf people. And she does it through the many fascinating lives of each character, most of them deaf, a few hearing.

If you are an ASL student or know a deaf person, you should definitely read this book. If your professor doesn't now about this book yet, tell him or her to read it. Even if you've never met a deaf person I think that you will find this to be a great read. It is breezy yet poignant and you keep turning the page to see what happens next to each person involved.
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Format: Paperback
I will preface this review by stating that I was required to read this book for a graduate course called "Managing the hearing impaired child" this summer. Nevertheless, it was a decent read and for the most part I enjoyed it. Most pleasureable for me was learning about deaf residential school life through the eyes of the superintendent's "hearing" child. There was a lot of interesting family history (her paternal grandparents were deaf) as well as history about the school and how it evolved over the years (mostly oral background). I truly enjoyed reading about the personal stories of two underpriveledged deaf high schoolers who had different but equally difficult obstacles to overcome in order to find a future for themselves in the "hearing" world. Some chapters were a bit boring and felt laborious to get through at times but they were short so not to worry. Overall it was mostly easy to read and there were even some tearjerking moments. If you want to learn about the deaf culture in general, or the politics surrounding it (such as mainstreaming and cochlear implants), and even a bit about ASL and interpreting, this is a good book for you.
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