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Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America Hardcover – April 10, 2012

3.9 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“In this entertaining nod to culinary and cultural histories, journalist Arellano traces the roots of Mexican food in the U.S. and explores the cuisine’s many offshoots, underscoring why salsa is now our #1 condiment… Arellano makes the point, one that’s particularly relevant in today’s heated immigration debate, that as much as some Americans may protest Mexican immigrants, they’re in love with Mexican food.” —Publishers Weekly

“An appealing cultural exploration of Mexican food in the United States…. Readers will come away not only hungry, but with a deeper understanding of the Mexican people and their cuisine.”—Kirkus

“In a chatty, lighthearted style and with mordant wit, Arellano traces the steady northward creep of Mexican cooking from Texas and the Southwest into the heart of Yankee territory­.”—Booklist

“[Arellano] manages to squeeze in mentions of just about every Mexican restaurant (including, believe it or not, both Taco Cabana and the dining room of the Austin Hyatt), product line, and preparation in the country. If you’ve ever wondered about the roots of Taco Bell or why fajitas are called that or who invented the frozen-margarita machine, you’ll find answers here.”—Slate Magazine

“Gustavo Arellano…is perhaps the greatest (and only) living scholar of Mexican-American fast food.” (The New York Times)

“An informative,entertaining glimpse into the story of how Mexican food entered Americanpopular culture.” (The Wall Street Journal)

About the Author

Gustavo Arellano’s ¡Ask a Mexican! column has a circulation of more than two million in thirty-eight markets (and counting). He has received the President's Award from the Los Angeles Press Club, an Impact Award from the National Hispanic Media Coalition, and a 2008 Latino Spirit Award from the California State legislature. Arellano has appeared on the Today show, Nightline, NPR's Talk of the Nation, and The Colbert Report. For more information, visit AskAMexican.net.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner (April 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1439148619
  • ISBN-13: 978-1439148617
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.2 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #662,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Darren Glass on October 1, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What an incredibly disappointing book.

If you know me, you know that I love Mexican food of all kinds. Whether it is cheap burritos in west Texas, high end alta cocina, regional dishes found in small Mexican villages, or moles that I make in my own kitchen, I love Mexican food. I have been known to plan vacations around Mexican cooking, including several cooking classes that my wife and I have taken. I am also very interested in food writing and the cultural history of food. So needless to say, I was excited to read this book.

And there were parts of it that were very interesting. Especially some of the opening chapters about tamales and the early days of Mexican food coming to America, which contained lots of information I havent seen anywhere else. But as the book went on I grew more and more tired of Arellano's high horses and pet peeves. He writes from a very southern california-centric point of view, and some of his generalizations to the rest of the country don't really mesh with my experiences living in Texas and the east coast (one example is that it seemed odd to read about the dissapearance of Tex-Mex at the same time that Chuy's is opening a dozen new locations) and it generally made me distrust many of his claims.

But most disappointing to me was Arellano's use of the word 'authentic'. Throughout the book he throws the word around in various ways without ever really seeming to intellectually engage with what he means by the term or even really giving a definition of it. Instead, he uses the word as a compliment at times while other times criticizing the ways other people use the term (for any of Diana Kennedy and Rick Bayless's faults, I at least understand what they mean when they use the word).
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Those with a high-minded take on food -- the kind who sigh and think warm thoughts of Paris and Prague when you say what you like to eat -- might find this book impertinent. Those who love Mexican food and insightful romps down the backstreets of American culture will savor every last word. Gustavo Arellano has a distinctive voice -- passionate, humorous, welcoming -- and a strong sense of history. You'll eat your next Mexican plate with a greater awareness of the entree's origins and terrific stories to share with those at your table.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a must in every home library for those of us that remember Mama's hand made tortillas and the funny looks we got when we brought out lunches in large grocery bags all rolled up.

I was very interested in the assimilation stories of Mexican and Tex-Mex food into the white homes and what they considered to be Hispanic food. I still have friends today who feel that "Taco Bell" is Mexican food, and have never ventured into Santa Ana, CA for the real delights held in places like Sarinanas Tamale Factory.

It was one of the most thorough accounting of the Ray Kroc school of graduates that I have ever run across, that included Glen Bell and others.
While I was surprised not to see the Pup N' Taco franchise noted, this was one of my first experiences with Americanized Mexican food, I was happy to see Del Taco and Naugles listed as I remember the Bun Taco at the Corona, CA franchise when I was a kid in the 70's

Overall a Great historical epicurean telling of the Latin food movement and definitely a well written accounting through the genius that is Gustavo Arellano.
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Format: Kindle Edition
An interesting, well researched book which chronicles the development and growth of Mexican food in the United States while providing a supportive analysis of Mexican American culture...and how the two coexist. I particularly enjoyed learning about the many entrenuers who started their food service businesses from scratch or modest means and grew them into multi-million dollar enterprises...very inspirational.

Gustavo Arellano is an excellent writer, and I found it difficult to put the book down once I started to read it!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I don't understand why some gave bad reviews to this thoroughly engrossing book. I love Mexican food like so many others and found the detail and range of topics very interesting and informative. You can appreciate the menu more when you understand it's history. Arellano is an entertaining and funny writer. His Ask a Mexican book and columns are outrageously politically incorrect (God bless him) and he is as fearless here but this is no polemic. This is like a great Menudo, a savory blend of several cultures and regions to produce a bit of culinary heaven. I especially liked the stories of the rise of Tamales, Tacos, Burritos, La Victoria, Taco Bell, Pace, Tapatio and so much more we encounter every day. I highly recommend this book to anyone that has a real interest not just in recipies but how they came about. Well done Gustavo!
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Format: Hardcover
Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America (By Gustavo Arellano)

Taco USA is a well-written, accessible, essayist trek through the history of Mexican food, and its meteoric rise to prominence in the USA over the course of the 20th century. With his snappy wit and his penchant for investigative journalism, Arellano plunges the reader into detailed profiles of some of the industry's mightiest pioneers - giving long overdue credit to a migrant class, who came to America seeking opportunity despite all odds, struck gold with their innovations, but have somehow been overlooked by the mainstream. Arellano also pokes holes in the snobbery of "authentic" style Mexican food, by arguing that all food, made by Mexicans, from Taco Bell to the taco truck should be adorned with equal designation when considering its ethnic cloak. He points out that many dishes we eat today arose out of the rich cross-pollination between two, sometimes, three, or more different worlds - subject to vast regional influences.

Taco USA also delivers answers to some of the most intriguing queries about Mexican food, such as: how did salsa become a condiment more popular than ketchup? And how did the margarita become the nation's most widely consumed cocktail? He provides mouthwatering details about some of our nation's most popular culinary mainstays: the taco, the burrito, and the tamale. And he even offers up a list of his own top 5 favorite dishes in the country (with adjective splendor), which has me yearning to hit the road to seek those savory dishes. For lovers of history, cultural commentary and biting satire ("The taco at Taco Bell is dead. Long live the taco."), this book is a joy to read.
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