Kindle Price: $11.99

Save $7.96 (40%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Taking Liberties: Why Religious Freedom Doesn't Give You the Right to Tell Other People What to Do by [Boston, Robert]
Kindle App Ad

Taking Liberties: Why Religious Freedom Doesn't Give You the Right to Tell Other People What to Do Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$11.99

Length: 200 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Daily Deals
Kindle Delivers: Daily Deals
Subscribe to find out about each day's Kindle Daily Deals for adults and young readers. Learn more (U.S. customers only)
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Review

“As a respected authority on church-state separation and culture-war issues, Rob Boston demonstrates an understanding of religious liberty that is sadly lacking among the God-fearing preachers and politicians of today’s religious Right. Taking Liberties is both entertaining and enlightening, a valuable resource for those who strive for sanity and reason in public policy.”   
 —David Niose, author of Nonbeliever Nation: The Rise of Secular Americans

"A valuable reminder of the importance of religious freedom in America’s past and present, and an eviscerating critique of attempts by the religious Right to use a false language of ‘religious liberty’ to undermine the very rights they pretend to support.”
—Katherine Stewart, author of The Good News Club: The Christian Right’s Stealth Assault on America’s Children

“Robert Boston eloquently makes the case for what religious freedom is and what it is not. It is the right for you to promote and try to convince others that what you believe is correct, but it is not the right to have the government do it for you. He backs up his case with many alarming examples of threats to religious liberty in political, cultural, and educational areas, among others. People of all faiths and of none can read and benefit from this thoughtful, well-documented book that shows why ‘live and let live’ on matters of religion can benefit us all.”  
—Herb Silverman, founder and president emeritus of the Secular Coalition for America; author of Candidate without a Prayer: An Autobiography of a Jewish 

About the Author

Robert Boston is the director of communications for Americans United for Separation of Church and State and the editor of Church & State magazine. He is the author of Why the Religious Right Is Wrong about Separation of Church and State, Close Encounters with the Religious Right, and The Most Dangerous Man in America? Pat Robertson and the Rise of the Christian Coalition. He is also a frequent contributor to The Humanist, and his articles have appeared in Free Inquiry, The Skeptical Inquirer, Conscience, and other publications.

Product Details

  • File Size: 731 KB
  • Print Length: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (March 4, 2014)
  • Publication Date: March 4, 2014
  • Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00F1W08LI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #680,034 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I am ardent believer in the separation of religion and government and in right of each person to have religious autonomy. I have long looked for a better way to explain to others why their religious beliefs do not constitute a right to force me to behave as they believe. Rob Boston covers almost every possible situation and explanation eloquently and thoughtfully in "Taking Liberties." It is concise, easy to read, and helpful to those of us who want more arrows in our quiver of logic when combating the idea that religious liberty means denying others their basic freedoms. I highly recommend this book. --Amanda K.
Comment 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent book about what's happening these days in the culture wars. It gives the lie to the latest spin from the religious right, which claims that Christians are being persecuted because they can't impose their beliefs on others. Boston gives a thorough account of the history of the church-state controversy, and even though I already knew quite a few of the things he talks about, I did learn a lot. My main regret is the "Preaching to the Choir" problem: the people who need to read this book almost certainly won't (and probably won't even learn of its existence). But it's good as a source of talking points for when the subject comes up in conversation, and perhaps for letters to the editor. One thing I didn't know was that vouchers for providing tuition at private, often religious, schools didn't fare well in the Tennessee legislature because of fears that they would be used in Islamic schools. And exactly that has happened here in North Carolina: of the top three religious schools that parents applied for vouchers at, two of them are Islamic madrasas, which was no doubt not what the legislators had in mind! The Law of Unintended Consequences at work.
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The religious right is desperately trying to regain the control and influence it once had in this country. We are fighting battles that were fought and won decades ago, many in my own lifetime.

Full disclosure; I am an anti theist and a proud one. I am occasionally vilified by others including family members but this does not affect my passion about protecting the foundations of true freedom on which this country was founded. We are not, nor were we ever meant to be a theocracy....even a "soft" one. But I believe we are already becoming a soft theocracy unless we put an end to religious bias in our laws and religious privilege in our society.

I highly recommend this book to all who value freedom, religious or otherwise. Even you Mr. or Ms. Mainstream Christian! You have skin in this game too although you might not realize it.

A word of warning: If you suffer from depression or hypertension please be sure you have taken your medication. This book will P**S you off.

But that might be OK as long as it prompts you into action.
1 Comment 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
About a year ago, I read Rob Boston's Why the Religious Right is Wrong about Separation of Church, a primer that brings all of the key Church and State issues together in a concise, digestible package. Boston's just released follow up - Taking Liberties: Why Religious Freedom Doesn't Give You the Right to Tell Others What to Do - offers the same clear, well-argued style that characterized his last book.

Now, in an ideal world, the opening line of Taking Liberties - "The Term religious freedom means the right to make decisions about theology for yourself."[emphasis mine] - would be enough to put this particular subject to rest.

But we're not living in an ideal world. Indeed, as it happens, Taking Liberties could hardly have arrived at a more critical juncture given the slate of bigoted proposals that are currently rifling around our country under the banner of `religious freedom.'

To paraphrase Boston loosely for a moment: If you're offended by gay sex, by all means, don't have it. Think pork is ungodly? Skip the ribs or stick with beef. And if you think contraception smacks of deviltry and your partner is on the same page, then either adopt the ascetic life or be fruitful and multiply like bunny rabbits. Religious freedom gives you the right to make all such decisions.

But honestly, if America wants to hold itself up as a beacon of democracy as it's done for two centuries, can we really afford to have our laws determined by medieval inquisitors like Antonin Scalia, a black-robed theocrat who openly admits to believing his particular interpretation of a repeatedly mistranslated collection of pre-scientific tales should trump the United States Constitution?
Read more ›
1 Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Taking Liberties: Why Religious Freedom Doesn’t Give You the Right to Tell Other People What to Do by Robert Boston

“Taking Liberties" is an excellent and timely book about what religious freedom really means. In a respectful and reasonable manner, Robert Boston (director of communications for Americans United for Separation of Church and State and the editor of Church & State magazine) provides clarity on a topic muddied by the religious right. This enlightening 200-page book includes the following seven chapters: 1. History, 2. Religion, 3. Sex, 4. Education, 5. Politics, 6. Culture, and 7. Persecution.

Positives:
1. Accessible and well-written book.
2. A fascinating and hot-button topic in the hands of a master.
3. Respectful and even-handed treatment of a sensitive topic. Boston is firm but fair. “Religion is not the problem. Fundamentalist religion that seeks to merge with political power and impose its dogma on the unwilling is the problem.”
4. The book flows nicely which makes for a smooth read.
5. The book is well focused on the following two premises: “The term religious freedom means the right to make decisions about theology for yourself. It’s the right to worship God—or not to worship at all—as you see fit.” And, “That is what religious freedom is. Here is what it is not: It’s not the right to tell other people what to do.”
6. Logical and persuasive examples throughout the book. “A same-sex couple’s decision to get legally married somehow threatens the religious liberty of a person across town who doesn’t even know them.”
7. Sound conclusions that resonate. “The only person you get to subject to religious control is yourself.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Taking Liberties: Why Religious Freedom Doesn't Give You the Right to Tell Other People What to Do
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Taking Liberties: Why Religious Freedom Doesn't Give You the Right to Tell Other People What to Do