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Tales From the Blue Archives Hardcover – October 13, 1997

4.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In his third book in a trilogy about human rights issues during the 1976 civil war in Argentina, the author combines pathos with irresistible suspense. Readers experience very personally the cruel deprivation of the heroic grandmother, Delores, whose children and grandchildren were either murdered or have disappeared. However, the army officer responsible for the crimes has survived, even flourished, living affluently with his own family. The discoveries Dolores makes regarding the whereabouts of two of her grandchildren result in a gripping and satisfying climax. An Ernest Hemingway Foundation Award winner (for Imagining Argentina, 1987), Thornton has written a refreshing and unexpectedly hopeful novel of loss and recovery. Although the latest entry in a series, it has the impact to stand alone as a beautifully written and arresting story.?Margaret A. Smith, Grace A. Dow Memorial Lib., Midland, Mich.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

The rousing, tearjerking last of a trilogy (Imagining Argentina, 1987; Naming the Spirits, 1995) involving Argentine psychic Carlos Rueda. Though only bit players here, Rueda and his daughter Teresa appear among many eerie, magical-realist touches in this richly, evocatively told, blood-is-thicker-than-blood melodrama. As the proud and fatuous Argentine General Rodolfo Guzm n attends the christening of his grandson, hoping that the future generation will benefit from the horrors he's committed, Dolores Masson, a grandmother, still mourns the loss of her family in Buenos Aires' Plaza de Mayo, especially her two grandsons, then infants, who were among the desaparecidos--the unknown millions abducted, tortured, and murdered by the country's now-deposed military junta. Refusing to give up hope, Masson visits Rueda and Teresa and is told that the boys, now teenagers, are alive and well in the remote fishing village of Mar Vista. Masson immediately departs for Mar Vista, hoping to bring the boys back home but failing to consider how the intervening years may have affected them. Indeed, Manfredo and Tom s have no memory of their real parents, or even of their former names. To make matters more complicated, General Guzm n, possibly implicated in yet another revelation of political atrocities committed while the military was in power, gave the boys to their foster parents, Eduardo and Biatrix Ponce, who once tended a killing field for him. Causing more emotional harm than good, Masson, with her knowledge of the boys' birthmarks, gets custody while the two undergo genetic testing. The general, fearing exposure of darker deeds, tries to sabotage the tests, setting off a series of suspenseful, grandly tragic plot twists ultimately leading to suicide, murder, and a rain of lamentation. For all its operatic pomp, Thornton's vision of beyond-the-grave revenge and retribution comes off as heartwrenchingly sincere. A simmering, passionately satisfying, character-driven finale. (Author tour) -- Copyright ©1997, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (October 13, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385480105
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385480109
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,436,177 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

By G. Torres on May 31, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
**Some Spoilers**
It took me fifteen years to finish this trilogy and I have to say I was expecting more. The book's prose is not as beautiful as the first two books (Imagining Argentina and Naming the Spirits) it felt more mundane. Dolores Masson was able to recover her stolen grandchildren after 13 years and instead of focusing more on how the grandmother and the boys relationship evolved through time, he spent or better said wasted so many chapters on General Guzman, Eduardo and Beatriz Ponce the marriage responsible for the Illegal appropriation of the children after their mother was murdered by the junta. I do not care about General Guzman and his mistress or the constant reminder of how the Ponces greatly suffered after the boys were Rightfully returned to their grandmother. The book is OK, the first two are much better.
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Format: Paperback
The lyrical power of Thornton's prose gets better and better with each new book. In this book, he follows the trail of the missing "adopted" children and the determined search of the grandmother from the time when so many people disappeared, either killed or kidnapped by the Argentinian military - stories that began in his wonderful, earlier books: Imagining Argentina and The Naming of the Spirits. There is a truthfulness to his writing that bypasses logic and goes straight to the heart. I couldn't put this book down. From one novelist to another, I want to congratulate Thornton on producing some of the most powerful literature I have read in the past few years.
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Format: Hardcover
I'm so glad I read this book. It satisfies on many levels. The senseless tragedies of the "disappeared" is made personal in a well written tale. The community of grandmothers who marched every Thursday is the foundation for an incredibly constructed story that, at its core, embraces two boys raised in a family not their own.
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Format: Paperback
I just returned from Argentina; I also read Imagining Argentina. This one is the best. It creates a world of magical realism in which you are drawn into each & every character. Not to be missed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent service. Description of book proved accurate.
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