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on April 17, 2013
...the audience would literally double. Because here, without pandering or indulging in cliche, is the kind of graphic novel female readers would flock to in droves. Assuming, of course, such a thing existed in American comics and was actually marketed in such a manner that the female audience was allowed to become aware of its existence.

A wonderful combination of prose and top-flight cartooning, Tamara Drewe is a story full of flawed, yet intriguing characters whose foibles actually make them more interesting. The titular character is herself more of a catalyst in the story than she is a protagonist, an approach which keeps Tamara at a distance from the reader: we are as curious and fascinated by this woman as the characters in the story whose lives are changed by her very presence (indirectly in some cases, more directly in others). It's a romance story, or rather, the story of a number of overlapping romances, but more importantly, it's a story about identity, and the exploration of same. How do we define ourselves? How do others affect that definition? How much does our concern about how others define us actually impair our ability to define ourselves in the first place? It's heady stuff, yet handled in such a light, breezy manner as to take the reader by surprise; you won't be thinking about the larger theme of the piece until you're done...the narrative itself is that compelling.

Elegantly drawn and flawlessly written, Tamara Drewe reminds us what a tragedy it is that both the US and UK comics markets let "comics for girls" die off decades ago, yet offers an encouraging template for a potential return of the form. Top marks.
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on October 31, 2017
Saw the movie and was curious to read the book. Was surprised to discover that it is one of those graphic novels. The book is somewhat darker than the movie, but quite interesting. If you're looking for something different, this is it!
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on May 14, 2017
It was watching the movie that made me want to read the book. At first I was taken aback by the format, but quickly got into the flow of the book and really enjoyed it.
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on November 22, 2017
This is a great book. It's a really good for people who love to read, but aren't very open to trying graphic novels.
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on February 6, 2011
Tamara Drewe is an intelligently-written book that employs some very creative strategies to tell its tale of infidelity and intrigue. Honestly, I felt the literary retreat setting has been way overdone in modern lit, and as a result some of the literary characters in Drewe come across as too familiar and a bit rote. The illustrations are charming, and help add a strong feeling of place and atmosphere.

But the real triumph is Simmonds' great way with dialogue and voice. Each of the characters comes across as a vivid person, with their own distinct emotions, point of view, and verbal quirks. Simmonds does an excellent job of combining prose with visuals, in the process creating what was, for me, a new approach to storytelling.

If you're looking for a graphic novel that has real depth, I recommend starting here.
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on November 1, 2015
Had to get this book for my Fiction and Film class for college and it was a really good read. I would get a little confused as to what bubble to read next but that's because I am not a seasoned graphic novel reader. I really liked this one though.
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on July 6, 2009
Tamara Drewe is a loose, contemporary re-staging of Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd, and Simmonds does a smooth job translating it to a modern-day setting. I love the look and feel of Posy Simmonds' work, a hybrid of a graphic novel and typeset prose. Her pictures integrate with the story and characters in a remarkably seamless way. Highly Recommended.
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on February 7, 2014
This author needs to have more of her books celebrated in the USA. It doesn't matter that it's British---the theme is hilariously simillar to those who know of this 'ilk' in America! One of the best satirical graphic novelists I have come across.
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on October 26, 2016
Loved the book. Watch the movie.
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on August 12, 2011
Well-done artistically, but the end of the book one wonders, 'What is the point?' Much ado about nothing? Charming in places but contained character I really didn't care about in the end.
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