Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$4.24
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by worldofbooksusa
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

And Tango Makes Three Paperback – Import, 2007

4.4 out of 5 stars 297 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, Import, 2007
$4.37 $4.24

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Childrens Boo (2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847381480
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847381484
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.2 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (297 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,673,519 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I recently saw a discussion on a television talk show about this charming little book. Two of the women were mothers and were discussing how they wouldn't read this book to their children. I had heard of the book before so I decided to buy the book and see for myself what might be "offensive" enough in a children's book to keep it away from little eyes.

What I found, is an enduring story (and a true one) based on two male penquins who form a bond so strong and loving that their keeper guesses "they must be in love." The story shows the two boy penquins doing all the same things the mated penquins do with the exception of hatching their own little baby. After the keeper finds an extra egg that is laid by another penquin couple (penquins can only take care of one egg), he decides to give Roy and Silo (the male couple) a chance to rear a little one. With much dedication, the two loving penquins take turns sitting on their nest and after a while, they hatch a cute little daughter, who is named Tango by the keeper.

To me, this book is a story of love. It shows how families are made up of different components and yet, with differences, there can still be undying love. I think many people might look at this book as only a children's book addressing homosexuality. These people are missing the point. This book is a story of love....the love two adults (regardless of gender) can have for each other and the love they can show a child that they raise. It could also been seen, in my opinion, as a book about adoption, where a couple can't have children and how they still shower their baby with love though it is not their own biological creation.

I think the story is told with tenderness and is thoughtful of the mind of a child.
Read more ›
7 Comments 265 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What a wonderful book. This story of two male penguins who were given the chance to nurture an egg and the penguin chick they hatched had me smiling from page one. My five year old was enchanted and I know that it will be a frequent re-read. I love the message of diversity, the story that's told in a loving way but mostly I love the illustrations. The fuzzy penguin chick pictures alone are worth the price of the book.
Comment 201 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
And Tango Makes Three - Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

On the top ten list of most frequently challenged books (2009) from ALA: homosexuality

We live in a world with all types of families: two parents, one parent, grandparents, two moms, two dads, aunts, uncles, etc. It is the status quo today for life to be that way. It is not as taboo for two women to raise a child together (or two men, for that matter). There are all sorts of books available on the subject, for kids and adults. And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell is just one example.

I did a Wikipedia search for the book and found an interesting quote from Mr. Richardson: We wrote the book to help parents teach children about same-sex parent families. It's no more an argument in favor of human gay relationships than it is a call for children to swallow their fish whole or sleep on rocks. I don't feel the book should have been banned, but rather it should be used as a teaching tool for parents. I certainly would have no problem reading it to my children. I can't speak for my friends, but in my experience, they are open-minded and would give it a chance before making a decision.

The story is simple and talks about different types of families in the beginning. From there it goes into Roy and Silo (the penguins) meeting and falling in penguin love. As time goes on, they watch their penguin friends pairing off and laying eggs. They are unable to lay eggs, so they find a rock and take turns sitting on it in hopes that it will hatch. Eventually, their caretaker, Mr. Gramzay finds them an egg to care for. It hatches and Tango is born (named because it takes two to Tango). Tango, Roy, and Silo go on to live happily ever after.

Honestly, I really enjoyed this book.
Read more ›
2 Comments 47 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a true story of two male penguins in the Central Park Zoo that decided that they were a couple. They built a nest of rocks like all the other couples and sat on the rocks hoping for a chick like all the other penguins. With a little help, they ended up with their own special family. What a wonderful way to introduce children to the concept of different types of families! The love they have for one another is so touching and natural. It proves that these bonds form quite naturally and that the love shared is just as valid as in the traditional family.
Comment 181 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
It is appalling to me to know that there are sewar-filled, reprobate, sullied, paranoid minds, in which this book can be interpreted as having a cloaked "homosexual agenda."

Not since Jerry Falwell spotted "gay" Telly Tubbies on the loose has there been a more stupid accusation of a supposed threat to child development.

Only a sick jaundice eye would see such a "homosexual" agenda in this book. So fearful are these vacuous little minds that they fear that thier son or daughter after reading this book will irrevocably forego traditional heterosexual marriage, turn gay and have a homosexual union and adopt a child other than their own to raise. So threatening is this utterly absurd possibility that in some schools, the book has actually been removed from the non-fiction and childrens section.

So what is all the fuss about? What is this story? It is actually based on a true incident involving two male penguins that together took charge over an egg that they cared for until it hatched and reared the baby penguin, called Tango.

From a biological point of view, this incident is fascinating but not all together unqiue. While we humans would have difficulty perhaps fully appreciating this, it is testament to how the importance of the survival of the species can have such strong instincual drives for non-related members to ensure the survival of members of their species. But then again, this is not that unheard of even in human settings. In many places, the "it takes a village to raise a child" is actually taken literally, where non-biological fathers will watch over and protect the offspring of other men as if their own.
Read more ›
2 Comments 152 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?