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Comment: In very good condition book with the text inside being clean and unmarked. No notes or highlights. Exterior of the book shows minimal signs of usage. Overall in great condition.
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Tarot as a Way of Life: A Jungian Approach to the Tarot Paperback – May 1, 2007

4.4 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Much more than a "how-to" guide for memorizing the meanings of the tarot cards, Tarot as a Way of Life reveals how the major and minor arcana represent the day-to-day and lifetime process of individuation. With a marvelous comparison of the symbolic differences between decks, Karen Hamaker-Zondag explains why it's important to choose a deck that speaks to you. While most guides to the tarot approach the cards only as a method of divination, Tarot as a Way of Life delves into the tarot's illustrations as a manifestation of the life process and explains how this deck of cards can affect you.

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Dutch
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Product Details

  • Series: Jungian Approach to the Tarot
  • Paperback: 286 pages
  • Publisher: Red Wheel / Weiser (May 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 087728878X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877288787
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.6 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #424,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is a book that not only tells you what the Tarot cards mean--in plain English--but also gives a concise, credible explanation for why each card means what she says it means. She draws heavily on Jungian psychology in her interpretation of the Major Arcana, and on numerology (filtered through folklore and mythology) for the Minor Arcana, but in both cases she refers directly to what's actually on the cards--helping the reader see them as a coherent symbolic system, not just mysterious pictures. (She mostly uses the Rider-Waite deck, but gives an extended justification for her choice, comparing it symbolically with other popular decks.) I don't know that I necessarily agree with every one of her interpretations--but that's actually one of the book's great strengths. After reading it, I felt that I understood enough of what was going on in the Tarot to begin to have my own opinions. Hamaker-Zondag, who's a noted astrologer, includes a chapter on attempts to combine Tarot and astrology--and concludes that it may not be possible. She also includes straightforward, common-sense advice on how to conduct a reading and lay out the cards--instructions that are far more helpful than those in other Tarot books I've read. The one thing I don't like about this book is the title. It sounds like it's inviting you to join a cult. It's really one of the most feet-on-the-ground introductions you're likely to find.
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Format: Paperback
I believe each person who discovers the Tarot is a seeker of wisdom and knows there is a Power greater than ourselves. The Tarot reflects the combined wisdom of humans who have sought an understanding of the Will of the Divine or as Joseph Campbell has said it the Will of "the thing that stands behind."
My own path originated in a diverse religious upbringing, winded through an academic setting filled with various social science perspectives, encompassed therapy, developmental workshops, spiritual retreats, etc., and came to rest in a 12-step program. After all these experiences, I recogize the Tarot as a cumulative human effort that places a face on the sum of my experiences. I too started as "the fool" and discoved the world.
A knowledge of Jungian psychology will help one understand and appreciate Karen Hamaker Zondag's TAROT AS A WAY OF LIFE. If you've taken a Myers-Briggs personality test, read Joseph Campbell's works on 'The Hero' or seen the Moyers-Campbell interviews, are familiar with T.S. Elliot's poem 'The Wasteland', or ever been in a 12-step program, you've been exposed to Jungian concepts.
Using Jungian concepts, Zondag explains how the Tarot deck can help the individual develop and use an organizing principle for living. Each of the cards of the Major Arcana represents some aspect of life that occurs for every conscious human being. Zondag divides the cards of the Major Arcana into three components: the basic drives; the construction of the ego; and the integration of the consciousness and unconsciousness. Zondag uses illustrations from several sets of Tarot cards to show why she prefers the Waite Tarot Deck illustrated by Pamela Coleman Smith over others.
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By A Customer on November 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book took my Tarot work to a whole new level.
Don't let the title throw you -- you don't need to be a psych major to understand the ideas presented in this book. The author relates the path laid out in the Major Arcana to life, so everyone should be able to relate.
This book is also a good reference. The book contains discussion of each major and minor arcana card, combining the symbolism of the suit with the card's number, and tying that into the image. As an advanced beginner, this was helpful, since it took me beyond associating keywords with cards, to using my intuition in my interpretation. After checking it out from the library for the third time, I knew this was one that I should own.
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Format: Paperback
First of all I would like to say that I do believe this is a "Genuine" book that has been written by somobdy who really believes the subject material as opposed to someone trying to make a quick buck. But equally in joining Numerology with Tarot the Writer (in this publication at least) evidently hasn't thought things through very well.
In simple terms what you find in these pages is something like this - say for example the cards that are Numbered "Nine", 5 + 4 = 9 so the Writer goes into great detail about the meanings of Five and Four in Numerology thus revealing the meaning of the card. All well and good but what about 7 + 2 - that equals Nine too. Or what about 3 + 6? Or 8 + 1? You see the problem here? Why has the author settled on this particular equation while ignoring the others?

Another basic fallacy that the Writer has made is the number of the cards in History. They make a great deal about the earliest Fourteenth century origin of Tarot Cards and why the number was set at 78 cards - but of course it WASN'T set at 78, this was a development with late Eighteenth Century Occultists - most of whom admitted later in life that it was all a hoax anyway. The Cary Yale certainly wasn't 78 cards. The Visconte Sforza has had the "Missing" cards reproduced in the 1970's but the general consensus among experts is that they never existed anyway. The Minchiate is not 78 cards, and a number of others, again you get the problem here.

There is some value here as alternative interpretatios to think about but there is so many holes in the Writers theory that discretion needs to be employed when using this method.
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