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Tartarin de Tarascon (Classiques Francais) (French Edition) (French) Paperback – June, 1996

4.0 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Paperback, June, 1996
$30.50 $3.26
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Alphonse Daudet est ne dans le Gard le 13 mai 1840. Il quitte tot les bancs de l ecole pour venir a dix-sept ans a Paris, en quete d une carriere litteraire. Il publie ses poemes ("Les Amoureuses" en 1858), puis ses romans ("Le Petit Chose", "Tartarin de Tarascon", "Sapho" ) qui fondent, petit a petit, sa notoriete. Il travaille comme journaliste et secretaire particulier, et rencontre, dans les salons, les grandes figures de son temps, notamment Flaubert, Zola et Edmond de Goncourt, avec qui il noue une relation intime. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Classiques Francais
  • Paperback: 157 pages
  • Publisher: Brooking International (June 1996)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 2877143384
  • ISBN-13: 978-2877143387
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,362,846 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Guillermo Maynez on February 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
Just as Alonso Quijano went insane by so much reading of chivalry novels, Tartarin goes crazy from reading so many adventure novels. He comes to think he can accomplish whatever the heroes in the books have, and so decides to go to Africa to earn glory and honor. Just like Don Quixote, he is ill-equipped for the task, but that doesn't diminish his enthusiasm a bit. Tartarin wants to be a great hunter, so he goes to Algeria, where all he gets is to be robbed and kill a blind lion in a circus.
Tartarin is a great character of world literature, a funny man with disparate ideas and neverending trust in success. There are several novels about him, and this is the first of the series. Hilarious and irritating, this man and his adventures will make you laugh and think about your dreams and how good it is you never tried to make them come true.
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By A Customer on July 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
When it comes to discovering the spirit of Provence, never mind Peter Mayle, nor even the wonderful Marcel Pagnol. Alponse Daudet was responsible for bringing the exquisite subteleties of the Provencal character to the notice of Northern France as early as 1872. The novel is written with such hilarity, yet such sensitivity, that it makes you desperate to retell it to anyone who will listen. Simply hilarious!
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Format: Paperback
Tartarin de Tarascon is a novel heavily inspired by Cervantes' masterpiece, Don Quixote. Tartarin, the hero of the novel, is as fuddled and as charmed as the great Don, though his adventures are necessarily less, being but a pale shadow of the true hero's.

Tartarin is the great hero of the small town of Tarascon. A popular sport where he lives is hunting, though unfortunately there are no wild animals left to shoot and kill. So, the men of Tarascon devise a new method for showing off their hunting prowess - they hunt each others hats. Every Sunday, without fail, they gather in a clear field and throw their hats in the air, for shooting. The man with the most holes in his hat is proclaimed the winner and, because he is as wonderful at shooting as he is at everything else, Tartarin is always the winner. Daudet allows that the hat industry in Tarascon makes a brisk trade.

We are shown the hobbies and quirks of Tarascon, always through the skewed vision of Tarascon. In every aspect, he is the man about town, a hero without an adventure, a winner without a challenge. Daudet is quite witty in his attack on the small-mindedness of some townsfolk, with the initial twenty pages or so of the novel proving quite hilarious. Tartarin is so revered about town that the stevedores on the quay declare he has 'double muscles', whatever they are. The narrator hastens to assure that he does not know the meaning of that confusing term.

So far so good. We are introduced to an appealing hero, a befuddled, Quixotic Tartarin. Indeed, the novel goes so far in its mimicry of Don Quixote that Tartarin is even referred to as 'Tartarin-Quixote' and 'Tartarin-Sancho', depending on his behaviour and actions.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great great book. Pure enjoyment in every page. Stendhal ability to bring to life characters, towns and situations is fantastic. This is light fare, nothing to make you think or grow, pure and healthy entertainment, but how enjoyable it is. Tartarin is an extremely likable character. I can't imagine why the people from Stendhal village could be upset about the book. His Quixote-Sancho in one creation is both endearing and enduring. And the appeal of those long ago times when life appeared to be so much simpler and better than today's makes my heart ache.
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This feeds into the archetype of the ex-warrior, soldier of fortune and international adventurer-- a real man's man, who's retired to the life of a comfortable country gent, now more given to being the master of the hunt in the countryside, living as an idol of flesh and blood to all the rustics about. It's interesting, rather quiant to tastes today, but I've got a soft spot for Daudet, in particular-- this main and title character.

The way the author attempted to deal with his debilitating syphilis, kept a fascinating diary on his ordeal, published in book form. I'd say for purposes of this story, which is a good deal of charming humor and travelogue of a naive man, misunderstood-- even unto himself, it's an interesting diversion from such thoughts as put down later by Alphonse. We all have happier days in our pasts, somewhere.

Of course, Tartarin did not have syphilis, that I'm aware of...
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