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Teacher and Child: A Book for Parents and Teachers Paperback – September 24, 1993

5.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner Paper Fiction; Rei edition (September 24, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0020139748
  • ISBN-13: 978-0020139744
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 8 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #781,622 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book has the potential to revolutionize teaching by conserving the best advice for teachers and parents who feel the need for guidance that does not recommend despair or surrender to whim or impulsive action but provides daily strategies and methods that embody high principles with the utmost respect for students and those who work with them in building not just a basis for learning but a basis for the best in cultured, civil, courteous behavior. One example: when confronting a mess of papers, pencils, or wrappers on the floor or elsewhere, one doesn't say, "What a slob hath wrought! Or something similar. One says instead: "This mess needs to be cleaned up." Possibly with an offer to help. A book of tactics and strategy for tactful approaches to the need for the discipline that is so essential for all kinds of learning along with the mutual respect that is also necessary between and among those engaged in learning and in producing an environment where learning can take place.
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Format: Hardcover
Anything I do as a teacher that turns out right can be traced back to something that I learned from reading this book back in 1976. Ginott's advice is dead-on, and though it is out of print, Amazon helps me locate old copies when I need them. I give a copy as a gift to anyone just getting started in the teaching profession. Haim Ginott knows whereof he speaks.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you work in the field of education, this book is for you. It speaks to how teachers have the power to dehumanize or humanize a child, among other things. It gives practical examples of how to help and support a child in your response, rather than hurt. I am so glad this was available on Amazon, I was moved to buy it as a reference, after I read a quote from Ginott in Rick Lavoie's book Motivating the Tuned Out Child.
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