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Terms and Conditions May Apply 2013

NR CC
Available on Prime
4.3 out of 5 stars (42) IMDb 7.4/10

Do you read the Terms and Conditions connected to every website you visit or app you use? This film reveals what corporations/governments are legally taking from you and the consequences of clicking "I accept."

Starring:
Cullen Hoback, Brian Lawler
Runtime:
1 hour, 20 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Cullen Hoback
Starring Cullen Hoback, Brian Lawler
Supporting actors John Palfrey, Harvey Anderson, Zaynep Tufekci, Eric Schmidt, Siva Vaidhyanathan, Eli Pariser, Debra Aho Williamson, Danah Boyd, Moby, Sherry Turkle, Rainey Reitman, Christopher Soghoian, Michael Schearer, Ryan Calo, Ellen Corbett, Barrett Brown, Margaret Atwood, Max Schrems
Studio Phase 4 Films (USA), LLC
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
I saw this documentary on television and then went out and bought it to show in my business classes; the documentary itself is that good and the content is a must see for everyone. Our privacy is no longer in our hands but in that of business. "Social listening" is the term used to describe how businesses gather your personal information in order to compile data with which to more effectively separate you from your dollar. In my college classes we had a whole morning of discussion regarding what this means to us as consumers and internet users. It now becomes our responsibility to counsel those around us-young and old alike. All in all, it is disturbing that 'big brother' is watching us so intently and with our permission. Yes, I teach business-this is a great subject to explore concerning the general lack of ethics in businesses we know and love so well, and how important it is to arm ourselves with information in order to protect ourselves. The subject matter is developed properly, however sometimes the documentary progresses a little slowly, but well worth the money to buy it and the time to watch it.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
A vital wake-up call to citizens who are seeing their privacy rights eroding in the digital age, with companies like Facebook, whose sole asset is the personal info of its 900 million users, sharing information with spying agencies. An alarming but essential documnetary
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Format: DVD
This well-crafted documentary featuring various talking-head social studies academics, indignant privacy campaigners of every stripe plus the techno musician-composer Moby, was made prior to Ed Snowden's superbly orchestrated press release of `revelations' about NSA data-gathering operations in the summer of 2013.

The particular hook here is the prolix, legalistic T&C which no-one reads but to which you must click `agree' before you can access Facebook, Kindle, iTunes, Skype, any email/twitter account or cellphone. This `agreement' legally entitles the provider to not only track and store all your online activity but supply the details to anyone they choose including retailers, advertisers, government agencies and police departments. The film showcases a series of shocked/indignant (and surely naïve) people denied border entry because of casual comments posted on Facebook i.e. "I'm going to destroy America next week" posted by an intended party-goer on holiday, or detained/arrested on the pretext of preventing potential disorder during a social protest they planned & organised in advance by online activity, and so forth.

But the film surely begs the question: why all this synthetic indignation? Does anyone in the 21st century seriously still believe that anything online is `private' or `privacy' settings on a web browser mean anything? That every download, every phone call & email, every skype call or web page looked at is tracked, monitored, stored, bought & sold is surely universal public knowledge by now. It's been said that writing anything anywhere on the internet or twitter is no different to putting it in 10ft high neon lights in Time Square: it's now public property, recorded forever, and BTW welcome to the Brave New Public Online World.
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By NYFB on November 3, 2013
Format: Amazon Video
This documentary was made before Edward Snowden became famous. It is so well done and informative which allows you to understand that not only you were never ever in control of your data regardless you agree or not agree to the Internet privacy agreement that you are asked to sign, and regardless if you sign or do not sign, but more importantly how your data is exchanged for financial gain by all those Giants without your consent which you happen to be in love with... Bravo.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
Excellent and thought-provoking. Presented many points of view and I appreciated the non-partisan look at the government's look. Let's just say that both the Republicans and Democrats have been equal-opportunity perpetrators of infringing on American citizens' privacy rights.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
You know how every time you install an application, a piece of software, or register on some website you have to click “I agree” to their terms and conditions? Terms and conditions generally set forth in microscopic print and fills several pages, which nobody takes the time to read—and if you did try to read it, you might find some of it illegible legalese anyhow.

This documentary makes a good counterpart to “Citizenfour” which I happened to watch immediately before it. While Citizenfour concerns itself with government intrusions into our privacy, this documentary concerns itself with the rapidly escalating corporate intrusion on privacy. The growth of “metadata”; the ability to track where your cellphone is at all times, what you purchased, what websites you visited etc. in theory may only be collecting information anonymously, but when you link enough data from various sources (cellphone, home computer etc.) it is entirely possible to identify exactly who someone is and exactly what their habits are. Corporations are interested in this for a profit motive of course, while the government uses it for surveillance. In either case, as one commentator in this film observed, “I don’t know how it would be possible today to not leave a digital record of yourself that could be used to track your activities” or something to that effect. I found this not quite as gripping as Citizenfour, but the point of it is to try to build more consumer momentum demanding that companies not share information about their customers with each other. I give it a B.
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