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Textbook of Medical Physiology: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access, 11e (Guyton Physiology) 11th Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 107 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0721602400
ISBN-10: 0721602401
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. John E. Hall DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY AND B 2500 N STATE ST JACKSON, MS 39216 601-984-1810 jehall@physiology.umsmed.edu
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Product Details

  • Series: Guyton Physiology
  • Hardcover: 1104 pages
  • Publisher: Saunders; 11 edition (September 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0721602401
  • ISBN-13: 978-0721602400
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 8.7 x 1.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (107 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #69,519 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Darrell Wu on April 21, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I agree with the reviewer from Israel, this book is exceptional at explaining physiology. During my first year in medical school I used Berne and Levy as the text for medical physiology and I found it to be a very good text. But reviewing physiology during my second year I used the text by Guyton and I couldn't believe how well written and clear it was. Both texts are excellent and I give both 5 stars, but I would definately recommend Guyton for a first read, and then Berne and Levy.

However, not all sections in this book, like not all sections in Berne and Levy are excellent. I recommend supplementing reading in Respiratory physiology by West or weinburg, Renal Physiology by rose or vander, and GI with Johnson. Cardio use B/L-it's the best. Endocrine, Guyton is good. Nerve and Muscle physiology use Berne and Levy; and Neurophysiology I highly recommend reading Neuroscience by Purves and Essentials of Neuroanatomy, Neurophysiology by Gilman.
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Format: Hardcover
"When the length of the spindle receptor increases suddenly, the primary ending (but not the secondary ending) is stimulated especially powerfully, much more powerfully than the stimulus caused by the static response. This excess stimulus of the primary ending is called the dynamic response, which means that the primary ending responds extremely actively to a rapid rate of change in spindle length. Even when the length of a spindle receptor increases only a fraction of a micrometer, if this increase occurs in a fraction of a second, the primary receptor transmits tremendous numbers of excess impulses in the Ia fiber--but only while the length is actually increasing."

I have quoted at some length from an almost randomly selected passage on muscle sensory receptors to give you a chance to see for yourself what Guyton and Hall do. If this sort of thing sounds like gobbledygook to you, then avoid this book. If it sounds obvious and trite, you too should not bother with this book. (You may be one of the two types of readers I discuss below.) But if, like me, you knew about muscle spindles but didn't know the actual mechanisms and, like me, find the clarity, completeness, and detail of this description extraordinarily exciting, then Guyton and Hall may be just what you're looking for.

I can imagine two types of readers for whom Guyton and Hall will not work, both represented fairly well among the other reviewers here. One is, so to speak, below the book, the other above it. The book will suit neither those coming to anatomy and physiology for the first time (unless they are extremely intelligent and motivated) nor those whose grasp of the English language is slight (either because English is their second language or because they read and write rarely).
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Format: Textbook Binding
I agree with the previous review that this book is quite long and is not at all concise. Concepts repeat themselves everywhere. However, not all students are so bright that they can remember everything in just one go. I am a medical student myself, and I find it frustrating to not being able to understand some important concepts in the later part of a course just because no one reminded me of one or two simple things taught before that I have forgotten. Te secret of the Guyton lies here. Information is repeated continuously, so giving the book consistency throughout the text, as it travels through different areas of physiology. The secret of its lucid explanations lies here too: Guyton likes to hear himself talk. Remember, THIS BOOK IS RECITED. Guyton couldn't write! That's why his text is so similar to a teacher with a voice. You are reading his lecture scripts.
Anyway, I love the book for its explanations where every concept is explained from the very first principles, even though they were taught before in just the page before.
Yes, it is quite a physiology for dummies, but there isn't a lot of students who are not dummies. Being a "dummy" does not mean you are stupid, a "dummy" is just a person who can't memorise and digest everything in one go and needs some reminders here and there to facilitate learning. If you've got a camera memory, don't get this book, or you will feel bored.
However, it's really a long text, so I read it as if it's a leisure book and memorize as much as I can. Don't push yourself!
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Format: Textbook Binding
Guyton remains one of the best physiology books for the medical student with its clear elucidation of fundamental physiological concepts and its pathophysiological correlations.
I want to address some of the criticisms of this book. One reviewer claims that it is missing trivia that professors love like the so called ENaC channels. Well, it does mention these channels on pg 304 as the special channels through which sodium diffuses into P-cells. Any medical student who has studied pharmacology or medicine knows that these are the channels that are inhibited by potassium sparing diuretics (amiloride and triamterine). Till recently they were called amiloride inhibitible sodium channels. Since they are found on other epithelial cells, they are now called ENaCs (epithelial sodium channels). There may be many more such trivial points you may find missing in Guyton, but if it is physiology you want to learn (rather than get into trivial pursuit) this is the book for you. No book is perfect and no book can contain EVERY single detail. Even Ganong, while being a very good book is lacking in the explanation of many fundamental concepts which it states but does not explain, for example it just tells you that high protein diets raise the GFR, but only Guyton tells you why. The chapters on cells and immunity etc could use updating, but these are topics covered in great detail in other courses--cell bio, molecular bio, biochem, immunology.
Another criticism is about lack of diagrams. I found that the diagrams in the book were of a functional nature--good enough to explain the concepts being discussed. If it is comic books you are looking for, buy an atlas.
Thirdly, the so called verbiosity. Yes, the explanations are detailed, but many first time readers would find that a positive point.
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