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Showing 31-40 of 64 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 107 reviews
on November 17, 2013
Very informative and a pleasure to read. Puts a human face on the systems involved in feeding us. Have recommended it many others.
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on April 11, 2012
Nearly half of my career as a water resources engineer was spent involved with delivery of water to central California farms, but I never got an appreciation for how hard the work in the fields was until reading "The American Way of Eating." The author really couldn't cut in that job (nor could I). Gaining an appreciation for the difficulty of that low paying work alone is worth the read. Excellent research (the hard way described well) for her writing make this a book from which we can all learn, especially those of us who have never found ourselves trying to scratch out a living at or below minimum wage. Besides her knowledge gained from working she also did much research in publications that she shares in frequent footnotes. This is a very credible accounting.
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on December 5, 2015
Cool book.
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on October 28, 2015
Thank you :)
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on November 24, 2012
This book is full of good information as well as input from the author's experience. Anyone interested in the food system, food justice, or reasons not to eat at Applebee's should read it.
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on December 3, 2012
McMillan's conclusion that working conditions and wages for the people who provide conventional food in the US is spot on. The book is very well researched and a great read.
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on September 23, 2013
Reading this book, I got the sense that Ms. McMillan was trying to do for the food industry supply chain--from field to restaurant table--what Barbara Ehrenreich did for minimum wage jobs in "Nickeled and Dimed." It doesn't quite come off. She takes us from the garlic fields of California, to Walmart in Michigan to Applebee's in NYC attempting to demonstrate where our food comes from, how it gets marketed and then on to our restaurant table. She actually does a pretty good job of this and what she shows us is scary. What doesn't really come off is her various roles as undercover reporter.
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on December 26, 2012
Heard the author on NPR and since I am a Wellness Coach, specializing in people with food issues- I got it. Was an interesting read, much like Nickel and Dimed. I appreciate Tracie taking us through her adventure. I really appreciated seeing how our immigrant and illegals work for next to nothing. NOT FAIR! Would like our govt to subsidize fruits and veggies, not corn and soybeans....
Okay, it isn't much of a review of the book- but if you like undercover stories and are interested in the food train- get it.
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on May 19, 2012
If there was an answer at all. The author starts with an important question: Why do Americans eat the way they do and what, if anything, can be done to change it? From there she compiles a diary of her experiences in different sectors of the food industry.

The diary-entry style allowed irrelevancies into the book that distracted from her original purpose. She tells of being "shocked" by a co-worker's Christianity after that woman told her to "have a blessed day." As important or strange as that may have seemed to the author at the time, it was in no way connected to why Americans eat the way they do.

Apart from the distractions they cause, there is nothing necessarily wrong with the diary entries themselves. The problem is in what is lacking after the diary. She never takes the time to distill from her investigation an answer to her question. By the standard she set for herself, then, she fell short.

The book is not a total loss. Informative nuggets, such as how agricultural labor laws in California are put into practice by growers, are littered throughout. You will probably learn something if you read it, just don't expect to learn as much as the first chapter would lead you to believe.
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on March 10, 2012
The reason that this book is amazing is that it opens up a whole new world to people who may not be out looking for a "food nutrition" book. I just got this book and set aside my other reading to start the book ... and found it so good that I stayed up late reading it. Another reason the book is amazing is the footnotes, endnotes and bibliography ... very extensive! You can just read the book and skip "the fine details" ... or you can pause in your reading to check her footnote which often includes places where you can cross-check what she is saying! I appreciate this and have been reading every footnote as I read through her book. I would highly recommend this book!
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