Truck Reviews Beauty Best Books of the Month Men's slip on sneakers nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc CMA Fest Fire TV Stick Grocery Handmade Personalized Jewelry Shop by look Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon $0.99 rentals for Prime members $0.99 rentals for Prime members $0.99 rentals for Prime members  Echo Fire tablets: Designed for entertainment Kindle Paperwhite GNO Shop now SWMTVT18_gno



on September 17, 2017
Foe me ...So-So
|0Comment|Report abuse
on October 7, 2015
Love the characters in this book, especially LaMoia. Exciting and fast paced. Maybe not Mr. Pearson's greatest book, but still a good read. Like the sexual tension between Daphne and LaMoia.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on December 5, 2014
As always, another great novel by Ridley Pearson! Enjoyed every minute. The climax kept me turning pages late into the night!!
|0Comment|Report abuse
on August 6, 2015
Could not put the book down.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on August 21, 2014
One of Pearson's best. My daughter just finished reading this and she agrees.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on March 19, 2015
Fair. I generally like this author, but his main character was a woman this time and she just isn't right as a psychologist. Too defensive, not self aware, not enough empathy.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on February 27, 2018
Fascinating read.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on March 19, 2015
Good book
|0Comment|Report abuse
Unlike most of the other people reviewing this novel, I had never read anything by Ridley Pearson before. His was a name I had seen on the bookshelves for many, many years, but until last week I never was motivated to read anything by him. Long story short, I liked this novel a lot. The plot gripped me, the writing impressed me, the characters were believable, and I came away very pleased.

From what I gather, this is part of a multi-book series that features the Lou Boldt character as the protagonist, although in this novel he clearly plays a supporting role to police officer and psychologist Daphne Matthews, as well as another police officer John LaMoia. I thought that Pearson did an excellent job in making these characters seem real, and making the reader care about them. Throw in a handful of very creepy bad guys and/or suspicious characters, along with a few other colorful locals, mix in some flesh-tingling suspense, an atmospheric setting, and you have all the ingredients for a most engrossing and very entertaining read.

I'm looking forward to reading more books by this author, especially ones in this series. This guy is top-shelf stuff.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on November 19, 2002
Lou Boldt is third banana in "The Art of Deception" and psychologist Daphne Matthews takes over the lead with studly Jack LaMoia in the co-starring role. This freshens up a series that was running on fumes. Lou's troubles (wife with cancer, guilt ridden affair with Daphne, job dissatisfaction) were taking on the proportions of Job and becoming tiresome.
A troubled young woman is tossed off the Aurora Bridge. Lou is investigating the disappearance of two local women, one of whom is a personal friend and takes on a request from Mama Lu to investigate the "accidental" death of her cousin, Billy Chen. Daphne is up to her elbows in charity work at a local woman's shelter and trying to turn the life of a pregnant client around. All of these threads lead to the Seattle Underground, a city below the city, buried over more than 100 years ago.
Mr. Pearson excels on two levels: his characterizations are sharp and interesting. Via Daphne, Pearson gives us an in-depth look at suspects Lanny Neal, Ferrell Walker, and Nathan Priar. He keeps them in our face, and they are always lurking (sometimes literally) at the edges of our thoughts. Secondly, the locale. Pearson is magnificent in putting us in Seattle; you feel you should be reading holding an umbrella. And then the underground---the decay, the sickening odors and terrain, the sense of claustrophobia, the occasional dusty shop window untouched in 100 years reflecting your surprised image, the very real sense of an imminent cave in, and LaMoia's comment that graveyards are over their heads.
This is an excellent read with a smash of a finale and Pearson ties up the threads as neatly as an expert tailor. I could have done with a little less of Daphne's interior monologues. Sometimes I wondered what she was doing besides being lost in thought while all this furious action was taking place. Also feel the subplots of Margaret; Daphne's client, and Billy Chen were there strictly for plot purposes, not for their necessity to the story. However, these are minor quibbles. The gruesome level is fairly high, but manageable for all but the very faint hearted. "The Art of Deception" is an excellent addition to Ridley Pearson's fine stories.
-sweetmolly-Amazon Reviewer
25 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse