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on August 20, 2016
It turns out this isn't the personal finance book for me. I usually really enjoy this topic. But I feel like this book only relates a few unconnected stories of people being extreme cheapskates and doesn't provide any practical advice. If you think you may already fall into this category, you may enjoy reading story about other cheapskates. If not, I wouldn't recommend reading this.
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on May 3, 2015
Great read as usual - I had previously read his " How to retire the cheapskate way ". These were ideas he gleaned on a cross country bicycle tour for his previous book - Ideas from people he met along the way - Some good ideas, some not so much. I must be a born cheapskate as I already do a lot of what is suggested . I draw the line at some of the stuff , such as dumpster diving dinners etc .
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on September 13, 2012
Regardless of who you are, please spend the time to read this book. You don't have to buy it; borrow it from your library!

I've gifted copies of Jeff's various books to my father, who is nearing retirement, my surrogate little sister on her sixteenth birthday, and a dozen other people in between, always to overwhelming success.

Myself, then a cheapskate in denial/the closet, read Jeff's book and gained confidence to fight the "bitter miser" stereotype and go further with my escapades of cheapness. My father, a man who makes great money yet still spent his entire life in fear of layoffs, read about a way out. My surrogate little sister, having grown up very spoiled, finally started grasping the true value of hard work and money.

Jeff doesn't guilt, he doesn't lecture, and he doesn't prescribe; rather, he wins you over with gentle humour and the heart-warming anecdotes of his many diverse frugal friends.

In this humble cheapskate's opinion, you should begin here, with The Cheapskate Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of Americans Living Happily Below Their Means. If this book doesn't win you over... you're probably a vampire.

After that, circle back back to The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches: A Practical (and Fun) Guide to Enjoying Life More by Spending Less for more structured guidance on how to lean into a cheaper lifestyle.

Once you've gotten that far, I won't even need to tell you to pick up copies of Don't Throw That Away!: 1,001 Ways to Reuse Your Stuff So You . . . and How to Retire the Cheapskate Way: The Ultimate Cheapskate's Guide to a Better, Earlier, Happier Retirement, because you'll have already seen the shiny, shiny light.
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on April 29, 2016
A bit repetitious, but interesting and humorous. I got a number of good tips from it about saving money and even more encouragement to follow a life-style with less waste, based on the principle that when you don't spend money on something, that money becomes, in a sense, income. (Like the old adage, "Take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves.") That attitude to life can, for some people, free them from doing work they don't enjoy and give them more time for the things they love, whether or not those things bring in money.
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on July 8, 2012
I don't understand the reviewers who state they learned many money-saving tips. There really are no new tips. You are just told that if you dislike shopping and consider sleeping in a kid's surrendered bed at a stranger's house a vacation, you have earned cheapskate status. Is it really news to any parent of a high school senior that community college followed by a commute to a nearby university is cheaper? Every tip mentioned I have known for years and I don't know how anyone could NOT know such alternatives. Are there still people who can read a book who don't know that it is cheaper to borrow them at a library? And I am not going to pitch a tent under a bridge, wear ugly clothes from decades past, or take food from other tables in restaurants. I don't own an x-box, but I would sure buy one before I carried around a deck of cards in its place. When I was a young person starting out I had to live on next to nothing. Even then I always found a way to let a few small luxuries in- whether it was a new clothing item or a treat at an ice cream shop. Also, you can be frugal and not focus your life on paying off a mortgage. It is more important to maintain a savings account that will take care of your needs and have a sustainable retirement plan. I have owned houses, but now prefer to rent. I do not want to be on the home repair-lawn maintenance treadmill and I enjoy and use the amenities included in my rent. Different strokes for different folks. I think that there are guys like Jeff Yeager who would raise a beer to his way of life. But most people, especially women, would find it depressing.
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on March 22, 2015
His books are so fun! He gives you so many good tips, While entertaining you. I highly recommend this book for anyone. He's a silly guy and his tips are wonderful!
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on February 18, 2015
As with most books among these lines some good points some useless. Also a lot of lengthy examples aren't for me I like cold hard facts and logic.
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on January 1, 2015
Love his books. They really get you motivated to save money, recycle, and work towards retirement.
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on December 11, 2010
I admit to being frugal - in fact, I'm proud of it. My favorite word is "free." The Cheapskate Next Door confirmed that there are a lot of us who enjoy the challenge of living below our means and provides ideas for living well while living simply. Coupon-clipping is a starting point for want-to-be cheapskates and the author offers practical advice to reduce, reuse & recycle. Both of Jeff Yeager's books merit reading, whether a new copy, a library loaner, or a used book purchase via Amazon, Alibris, etc. (being a cheapskate, I bought my copy in used, in great condition, for pennies). Thanks, Jeff - reading your books was time well spent.
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on February 16, 2013
I retired recently but before I retired I read this book which was very helpful in getting my mind set right for retirement.
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