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Showing 1-10 of 275 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 371 reviews
Close to six hundred pages of Flannery O'Connor stories, which might feel overwhelming in a print book but not on the Kindle, where it doesn't matter how long it is and everything is immediately accessible at the touch of a finger. This collection is a great example of why I've come to treasure my Kindle!

This Kindle version is also very well produced, with a superb introductory essay written in 1971 by Robert Giroux, the late editor and publisher (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). The introduction can actually be read here on Amazon by using the 'Look inside' feature, worth the time for someone considering purchasing the book.

One minor quibble - this volume does not, strictly speaking, include all of Flannery O'Connor's short stories, omitting the posthumously published (1988) An Afternoon in the Woods (which for some reason is not included in either of the Farrar, Straus and Giroux short story collections of her works, this otherwise complete collection, or the less comprehensive Everything That Rises Must Converge: Stories).

In fact, the only thing more complete is probably the Library of America volume, which does contain An Afternoon in the Woods, along with all of her other short stories, both novels, and a selection of her essays and letters, altogether 1300 pages and no doubt a terrific volume for the bookshelf, but not available for the Kindle, as far as I know: Flannery O'Connor : Collected Works : Wise Blood / A Good Man Is Hard to Find / The Violent Bear It Away / Everything that Rises Must Converge / Essays & Letters (Library of America).

With respect to the writing itself, I am exploring it now but know that it will be superb. The lead review, by Mark Eremite, was particularly helpful, not that I required much convincing with respect to the value of her writing and this collection.

Flannery O'Connor's two novels are also available in similar Kindle editions:

Wise Blood

The Violent Bear It Away
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on March 21, 2015
This paperback collection served as my introduction to O'Connor's work and after reading only three of her short stories I became a disciple. O'Connor's short stories are absolutely captivating: these stories will stay with you for a long time. They engage race, southern life, Catholic concepts of grace and nature, and so much more. While the stories don't preach or engage in explicit Christian allegory, this collection is a must for Catholics looking to explore their own cultural and literary patrimony. But really, these stories are great for everyone. I highly recommend!

The book itself is large, but not large enough to be too clumsy. The book also feels a bit light for it's size, which caused me to initially question its durability. But after owning this work for a while now it is still in great condition.
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on September 26, 2016
Great writing. It is difficult to read these short stories all in a row. Most of the characters are depicted to highlight their worst traits. Although each story is well written, gives you something to think about, and is very well paced, taken as a whole they are depressing and paint a negative view of the human experience with very little to (pardon the pun) to redeem it..
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on October 20, 2013
A memento-mori imagination, a Catholic mystic in a Protestant landscape and a sense of humor that gave the irreverent middle finger to American mores. She did it her way. I'd sit on the stoop, serve her a mint julep, and listen to the cicadas and her sharpen her pen. My only complaint about her writing is that I sense that she didn't like people. I can't say that she was judgmental, but I don't detect much compassion for the characters she renders, unlike Carson McCullers.
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on September 5, 2016
Brilliantly written but exhaustingly dark. I am glad I have read some of her work, and they are distinctly southern literature, but I won't be reading then all because they are too full of despair, and I prefer my literature to have some escapist value, in addition to being beautifully constructed.
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on October 1, 2014
These are not upbeat stories. Flannery O'Connor has a certain view of life and people and it's a dim one. Her stories are hard to forget, but this may not be a good thing, depending on your own view of life and people. She is, nonetheless, a marvelous writer and story teller and for this reason this collection gets the four stars.
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on March 30, 2016
Not very enjoyable to read, though it is thought-provoking.. a glimpse into uncomfortable reality in rural America. I got the similar impression while reading Raymond Carver, depressing but essential for understanding the stark reality of everyday life in rural areas.
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on January 6, 2017
one of the most wonderful writers in my opinion. Excellent, well thought out and written. A joy to add to my collection.
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on July 15, 2014
O'Connor's, The Complete Stories, show the ways of the southern people in the south-region of our country. Done in wonderful detail by way of each story; the many character types, dialect that defined the descriptive character's southern area. At times, sad, serious, amusing. A reader of O'Connor's can be amused by a character's comments, or stunned by a situation but never grows tired of Flannery O'Connor's writing style. She wrote in a way that drew you to her story-tale much like gnats to the light of a lamp, to be read, over, and over. A true classic.

Jane St. John
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on November 26, 2014
Not exactly something you should read to lift your spirits. Well written and an interesting commentary on how our own superiority can taint our perception until it's "too late". Almost seems like the same theme was in a number of stories. Good local color. More twists of fate than usually occur in 500 pages.
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