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Customer reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
15
The Definitive Guide to GCC
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:$37.40+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on March 8, 2014
GCC continues to evolve and add new flags. Last year it stepped up to C11 and added new optimizations. GCC has FORTRAN and Java compilation capabilities, who knew?. The book covers the best use of Autoconf and Automake with GCC. It also covers using a host of support libaries. There are two section in the Appendix covering the use of specific options.

I found this book to be of immense value in giving me an instant expertise in the use of the GCC. I had a dual goal project that required the same code to work on both Linux and Windows. This book gave me the knowledge to make that possible in a relatively short time. My time is worth money, your time should be valuable to. Stop depending on dated website trivia and decade old Linux manuals. Step up to the real world and see what the future can do for you. It's covered in this book.
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on February 4, 2015
excellent book, thank you ...
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on December 10, 2006
Actually, this book does cover the FORTRAN and Java aspects of GCC for a couple of chapters, but yes it is mostly for C/C++ programmers. Anyway, if you want to learn about all of GCC's different switches, optimization techniques, and warnings then this book has it all. It also covers the "helper" tools like gcov.
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on September 5, 2010
Informative, both basic and more advanced uses. However the plethora of tags that gcc takes can leave you with a headache if you don't know what your looking for. I had hoped there was a chapter on frontend/backend use, and how to build an interface to call GCC. Doesn't get into GAS or GDB at all.
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on October 2, 2009
If your looking for in depth knowledge of GCC the compiler this is the book. It covers multiple opperating systems and multiple versions of GCC. Starting with the history of GCC up to current versions of 4.x. A must read for any C or C++ even Objective-C developers (GCC compiles many more languages). Its a great reference to have in your war chest!
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on August 12, 2015
Very helpful. I learned a lot about GCC and found this book very readable.
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on September 4, 2014
Great reference text.
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on November 30, 2007
If you want to know more about the gcc compiler this is the right book. Some alreade gcc experienced people could argue that the information could be found by searching the internet but I do not think so.
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on September 22, 2010
I found this book to be very helpful when I need to look up gcc command line options.
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on October 19, 2010
The ubiquitous GNU Compiler Collection is one of the fundamental underpinnings of Open Source and after a quarter of a century of development it is a formidable development tool. William von Hagen has done a masterful job in the second edition of the Definitive Guide to GCC in showing how to make the most of Richard Stallman's gift to the world. Occasionally the Author's sense of humour breaks up what can be a rather dry subject.

After a brief introduction to GCC, the author gets right into how to use GCC to compile C, C++, Fortran and Java respectively in the first four chapters of the book. While most of the book uses C code in examples of compiler usage, the Java chapter contains a good section on creating and using Jar files and Shared Libraries along with a brief section on how GCC supports Java and C++ interoperability. You quickly learn how to correctly use compiler flags to get the results you intend with these languages and gain an understanding of how they should be used. Importantly, without this understanding, it is easy to define flags that do not work as you expect, so the right off, this book can prove its worth. If you don't know what options are being passed to the gcc compiler in your makefile or know exactly what they do, then you aren't really in control of the build process for your code.

A significant change to the first edition was moving the first chapter of that edition, which covers the general use of the GCC compilers, into Appendix A. At 81 pages, this is the real meat in this book and I'm not sure that this was a good move, but it does align better with Appendix B, which covers machine and processor-specific options for GCC and hence can be considered an extension of Appendix A. The appendixes are rounded out with one on how to use GCC's On Line Help plus additional GCC support resources are provided in chapter 10.

My recommendations on how to get the most out of this book:
Read Appendix A, then check out Appendix B for the use of GCC extensions relevant to your particular machine/processor, then read the relevant chapter of the first four chapters for your specific language of interest. If you need to optimise or wish to debug your code using GCC's debugger and the use of gcov and gprof, check out chapters 5 and 6 respectively; I found these chapters particularly interesting. If you have problems that you suspect may be compiler related, chapter 9 covers troubleshooting. If your use of GCC isn't on an x86 IBM PC based computer, then check out Chapter 14, which covers building cross compilers with GCC and use Appendix B as necessary. If your target is an embedded design, this chapter, plus the optimisation chapter 5 along with chapter 13, which covers using alternate C libraries, will give you the background you need to use GCC for your project. Autoconf, automake and Libtool are covered in detail in chapters 7 and 8 and if you are interested in compiling GCC and building and installing Glibc (the author includes some valid reasons to do this), then these are covered in chapters 11 and 12.

Personally, I found the index frustrating to use, which I guess isn't surprising given the difficulty of covering the "1.3 zillion options" provided by GCC. If you heavily use the book, you may be better off purchasing the eBook, so you can search the book directly.
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