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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5

on December 13, 2014
I found it an enjoyable and amusing romp through the exceptionalism of American religion (not that it's a good thing). The funniest part was when the author hearing a version of Beethoven's violin concerto performed with solo piano in San Francisco, referred to it as being 'familiar yet somehow outrageous'.

Actually, it's virtually the only thing sensible in the entire book. Beethoven actually adapted his violin concerto for piano solo in 1808, and actually, it sounds quite reasonable (save for the unfamiliar 1st movement cadenza).

The religion however...
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on August 6, 2015
really enjoyed the travels and the humorous fashion in which he analyzes such a broad number of man-made religions in America.
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on September 11, 2016
So interesting to understand the commonalities in the development of all religions. An excellent read especially for people brave enough to question.
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on December 30, 2012
Fantastic book, highly recommended. As relevant today as when it was first published. It is extremely enlightening, insightful and gloriously scripted.
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on July 21, 1997
I read this book several years ago and am trying to relocate it. The author is a British journalist and, I believe, divinity student who spent two years traveling the U.S. and observing how religion weaves into the fabric of U.S. culture. About one third of the book covers the Mormons, and another third is spent in the Bible Belt. The author writes as an outsider with a cool eye, but midway through he has an allergic reaction to hypocrisy and gets into a shouting match with a born-again motel owner trying to chisel him on room rates. It's a totally fascinating piece of cultural anthropology
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