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The Loss of Nameless Things

2006

R CC
4.4 out of 5 stars (7) IMDb 8.5/10

In 1978, Oakley Hall III, the brilliant and charismatic founder of the Lexington Conservatory Theater, had it all. Together, his merry band transformed the run-down Catskills camp where they worked and lived into their creative paradise. THE LOSS OF NAMELESS THINGS is the harrowing tale of Hall's fall from grace, a bittersweet look at what was recaptured and a heartbreaking reminder of what was lost forever.

Starring:
Bruce Bouchard, Patricia Charbonneau
Runtime:
1 hour, 24 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Bill Rose
Starring Bruce Bouchard, Patricia Charbonneau
Supporting actors Bob Currier, Sofia Landon Geier, Barbara Hall, Oakley Hall, Sands Hall, Sigrid Heath, Deborah Hedwall, Carolyn Howarth, Michael Hume, Louis Jones, Kate Kelly, Steve Nisbet, Timothy Orr, Steven Patterson, James Rice, David Silberman, Philip Charles Sneed, Frederick Snyder
Studio PBS Indies
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Other Formats

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By William M. Rich on January 31, 2016
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
At first it was just a story about a self-indulgent more for less crazy person, but as the story progressed it became an amazing revelation of brain injury
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Format: Amazon Video
THE LOSS OF NAMELESS THINGS (2006) is a documentary dealing with numerous aspects of a catastrophic head injury suffered by Oakley Hall III in 1978. It is a very uneven film with some excellent parts, but it has far too many interviews of aging 5th-rate actors/actresses who are not too bright, not well informed, and much of the time not believable.

The editing is often poor, and the continuity is fuzzy at best. It seems that Bill Rose, the maker of the film, ended up with hours of footage that could be used to tell perhaps a dozen or more different stories, but he could not make up his mind which one to place in the foreground, which ones to make subordinate, and which others to eliminate ... so he jumped around and tried to do them all.

Among other stories, we get (1) the personal tragedy of Oakley Hall III; (2) the personal tragedy of his family (his wife, child, parents, and siblings); (3) the tragedy of society's supposed loss of a huge literary genius, cut down just as he was about to bloom into greatness; (4) the inspiring story of Oakley Hall III surviving a terrible brain injury and gradually recovering many of his mental functions; (5) the cautionary tale of an irresponsible community of youngish, twenty-something theater folks who abused their minds and bodies with excessive alcohol and various drugs before and after Oakley Hall was injured; (6) the cautionary tale of an irresponsible array of aging, fifty-something theater folks who misremember much of what occurred (or they never knew) and who in pretentious, self-aggrandizing ways "invent" stories about their past with Oakley Hall III; and (7) a polemical tale about how our society and most individuals are unwilling and/or unable to deal with and/or care for people whose brains are damaged.
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By Pam on July 9, 2013
Format: Amazon Video
Brain injury/disease is a subject that I am becoming more and more familiar with. I have to children with MS, my daughter is advancing rapidly. You will not be disappointed with this film. I personally hope that something similar is created to promote awareness and funding for MS. Most people know little about the devastating disease, although they may think that they do.
Hope you do that Bill.
Pam W.
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This is a harrowing cautionary tale. This is also moving tribute to the resilience of one man who teaches, by example, that there is life after "death." In fact, he teaches us that sometimes we have to "die" so that a new self, a better self, can emerge from the wreckage and make real miracles.

"The Loss of Nameless Things" is the perfect title. It is a line of a play written by a man who has lost the memory of many nameless things, but was forced to recreate himself, in a new image, figuratively and literally, after a horrific accident. And if there's anything I did not like about this film--and there is almost nothing I didn't like about this film--it is the lamenting that he cannot create "great art" anymore.

HE is great art. He is his own greatest creation. And watching him disintegrate...and then put himself back together like a huge puzzle of thousands of pieces, and come out happy and constantly evolving, still...is the best work of art I've seen in a long time.

I was so glad that Oakley Hall III didn't just die or wander off one night and never come back or come to some other sad end after the tragic accident that put an end to that first career. I suppose those who knew him intimately do indeed miss the stunningly handsome young genius who might've become one of our greatest writers. I like the one with the crooked but still beautiful face who is living an even more beautiful story than that young genius could ever have written.

You need to see this. It is filled with hope and courage, and Oakley Hall III is someone I wish more people would take the time to meet. I'm glad I "met" him.
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