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The Red King (Star Trek) Hardcover

3.6 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews
Book 2 of 7 in the Star Trek: Titan Series

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Pocket Books
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1415611750
  • ISBN-13: 978-1415611753
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Antoine D. Reid VINE VOICE on October 12, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The first book of the Titan series, "Taking Wing," was great. It was a nice follow-up to Nemesis, had the Titan crew coming together, playing around with Romulans politics. Great stuff. Yet, this one takes a rather odd step away. Don't get me wrong, it's not terrible, but it's also nothing to brag about. It's a rather average read that doesn't leave an impression like the first book did.

One problem, as described in other reviews, is the extensive list of characters. Who can keep up with all of them? It's not as if the last book came out a month or so ago so if you were to pick this one up, you may find yourself struggling to remember this or that unique character. What makes it so bad is that a lot of these characters are secondary or fill-ins. We haven't been given the chance to focus on the main group. I hardly can pin-point who the main characters are because everyone who appears is given equal importance. The crew is diverse, one of the most diverse in Starfleet history. We get it! It makes the book terribly hard to get through when you vaguely can recall or keep up with the two dozen or so characters that appear.

Second, there is no "gay agenda" going on. There's a gay character, so be it. Yet, I do feel that these authors, who do tend to include non-heterosexual characters in their works, are putting a bit too much emphasis on the character of Keru. What's the big deal about him? He appeared in "Rogue Agent" and wasn't exactly a ground-breaking character. He appears in the "Worlds of DS9." He appears in the Riker-Troi honeymoon story in "The Captain's Table" anthology. Yet, he's not terribly interesting. Yet, he's given the most attention perhaps out of any of the "new characters" and it gets annoying. We barely get to know anything more about Dr.
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By M. Sullivan on September 1, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was something of a chore to get through. First off, the book comes hot off the heals of the first book, which wasn't terribly interesting either. Second, the story takes place in the Small Magellanic Cloud with a race apparently introduced by these authors in an obscure Lost Era novel. (I say obscure as I've read the vast majority of Trek novels, but that one was beyond my notice.) The use of this "race" left me wondering what I'd missed in their back story, but really the Neyel are wildly unimportant. Third, the Red King conflict makes little-to-no-sense. The authors borrowed an idea from a DS9 episode, but the problem was they borrowed it from a bad DS9 episode. I'm a rabid DS9 fan, so trust me when I say that wasn't their best work.

There is a conflict between Tuvok and the admiral that doesn't really make a lot of sense. How can a Vulcan have a decades-old feud? The feud also brings up some kind of advanced mental prowess that the admiral and his race apparently possess. Basically, the whole storyline feels like it's reaching too far, a few hundred thousand light years too far.

The Red King doesn't make for a good story because the Red King isn't really a character or a villian. The conflict is strained. The characters just aren't compelling. The first and second Titan books spend far too more time describing wildly non-humanoid races than telling a story. Skip and go directly to Orion's Hounds.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Red King is the second book in the Star Trek Titan spinoff series. The series follows the adventures of William T. Riker (from Star Trek The Next Generation) as he commands the starship USS Titan, other returning characters include Diana Troi and Tuvok. This story is set shortly after the events of the movie "Star Trek: Nemesis" and picks up immediately where the first Titan book "Taking Wing" left off. The story is written with the assumption that you have read the first book, so you should probably read that first to understand what is going on. The book also ties in with the novel "Star Trek: The Lost Era 2298: The Sundered", but isn't necessary to enjoy this book.

The storyline of this book is pretty straight forward, with the crew of Titan and some Romulan ships stranded in the Small Magellanic Cloud (a dwarf galaxy near our own). Due to the events of Star Trek Nemesis a portal between Romulan space and this other galaxy has formed and is threatening to destroy the entire region. The storyline is primarily a man versus nature premise, with most of the drama spent on the characters reactions to this force of nature as they desperately try to stop the destruction and save as many lives as possible.

The second plotline is from the perspective of the Romulan Commander Donatra, who has to retrieve her lost fleet while dealing with an unruly co-equal Commander who has different ideas on how their fleet should proceed. This storyline felt anticlimactic however, as every time the tension ratcheted up it was quickly diffused in some quick and convenient manner.

There is also a minor racism subplot where some of Titans alien crew members discuss whether Riker has a bias towards humans over aliens.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Was hoping for a little more than was given.
I love Next Generation and I love the characters.
The characters in this book are a little too bizarre to picture in my mind.
All in all, a good story line.
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