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The Rescuers Down Under 1990

G CC

Two mice race to Australia to save a boy and a rare golden eagle.

Starring:
Bob Newhart, Eva Gabor, John Candy
Runtime:
1 hour, 17 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 3 days to finish once started.

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Buy Movie HD $17.99

Rent

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 3 days to finish once started.

Rent Movie HD $3.99
Rent Movie SD $2.99

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Buy Movie HD $17.99
Buy Movie SD $9.99
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Product Details

Genres Adventure, Musical, Action, Kids & Family
Director Hendel Butoy, Mike Gabriel
Starring Bob Newhart, Eva Gabor, John Candy, Tristan Rogers
Supporting actors George C. Scott
Studio Walt Disney Pictures
MPAA rating G (General Audience)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
You hear a lot about this film being Disney's first sequal, but don't let that freak you out if you've never seen the original Rescuers film. There's really no need to have seen The Rescuers to appreciate The Rescuers Down Under. The only thing these films share are the two main characters (Binard and Bianca) and the plot point of saving a child in jeopardy. Where the original was a touchy-feely story of abandonment, this film tackles the very different issue of wildlife preservation. I find this to be a far better film than The Rescuers (although I loved it as a child and still hold a special place for it in my heart), and a welcome change of pace form the usual Disney fare.
This was the first film to use Disney's new CAPS system of filming animation and the results are truly stunning. Bright vivid colors, blending and shading, sharp crisp lines, and subtle use of computer animation are the hallmarks of the "new" Disney and it all began with this film. The opening sequence is a great example of what the system can do and remains one of the most thrilling openings to any Disney film. More breathtaking scenes, like the flights with Marahute, futher attest to the technological achievement of the film.
Story wise this film gives us Disney's most realistic depiction of childhood to date (B.A. before Andy from Toy Story, but he's really a PIXAR creation anyway), in the protagonist Cody. He's strong willed, bright, has a sense of adventure and never seems overly cute. He's just a boy who wants to save his friend, the last golden eagle Marahute, from the evil poacher. Some very fun and comic characters are introduced (notably Frank the lizzard) to offset one of the meanist villans ever, Percival McLeach.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This movie has a wonderful message about friendship and how precious every life is, be it human or animal. The film has everything going for it; great animation, wonderful background music, and a story that combines humor and high drama. The story is about how an Australian boy named Cody comes to the aid of a beautiful eagle, that was illegally trapped by a poacher named McLeach (George C. Scott), only to find himself later kidnapped by McLeach. Woodland creatures send for help via an elaborate telegraph to a couple of UN delegate mice, named Miss Bianca (Eva Gabor) and Bernard (Bob Newhart) in NYC. Bianca and Bernard enlist the services of a hilarious albatross named Wilbur (John Candy) and set off across the atlantic to...well, rescue Cody. The story even has a little romance between Miss Bianca and Bernard thrown in for good measure. The highlight of the film for me actually comes early. After Cody releases the eagle from the trap, he nearly falls to his death only to be swooped up and taken for the ride of his life by the grateful eagle. Believe me, everytime I view this sequence I get teary eyed. A beautiful film, one of Disney's best!
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Format: DVD
You hear a lot of talk about this film being Disney's first sequal, but don't let that freak you out if you've never seen the original Rescuers film. There's really no need to have seen The Rescuers to appreciate The Rescuers Down Under. The only thing these films share are the two main characters (Binard and Bianca) and the plot point of saving a child in jeopardy. Where the original was a touchy-feely story of abandonment, this film takcles the very different issue of wildlife preservation. I find this to be a far better film than The Rescuers (although I loved it as a child and still hold a special place for it in my heart), and a welcome change of pace from the usual Disney fare.
This was the first film to use Disney's new CAPS system of filming animation and the results are truly stunning. Bright vivid colors, the blending of shades into one another, sharp crips lines, and subtle computer animation are the hallmarks of the "new" Disney and it all began with this film. The opening of the film is a great example of what the system can do and remains one of the most thrilling openings to any Disney film. More breathtaking scenes, like the flight with Marahute, further attest to the technical achievement of the film.
Story wise this film gives us Disney's most realistic depiction of childhood to date (B.A. before Andy from Toy Story, but he's really a PIXAR creation anyway), in the protagonist Cody. He's strong willed, bright, has a sense of adventure and never seems overly cute. He's just a boy who wants to stop the evil McLeach from killing the last of the great golden eagles, and his friend Marahute. The relationship between Bianca and Benard is expanded upon, but again you don't need to know their history from The Rescuers to understand what's happening.
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Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Disney's reputation as a shameless shiller of sequels had noble origins, when at the height of the company's renaissance it produced an absolutely killer follow-up to one of its more modest classics, The Rescuers. "The Rescuers Down Under" didn't make nearly as much money as the other films of its era, and this probably would have a lot to do with the company's future strategy of releasing most of its sequels straight-to-video, but that belies the fact that this is a superb animated adventure. Though it probably appeals more to a slightly older audience than Disney's tamest fare, its contemporary leanings and large scale mixes well with the company's masterful animation and makes for a gem in Disney's library.

The story: When a greedy poacher (George Scott, Patton) kidnaps a young boy (Adam Ryen, Stepfather 3) to coax from him the location of a rare golden eagle, the returning Rescue Aid agents Bernard (Bob Newhart) and Bianca (Eva Gabor) travel to Australia to mount a rescue.

The reason the movie may not have done well financially is that it's so different from its predecessor. The original was moody and thoughtful, with several quiet conversations in the dark and a soft soundtrack that allowed the viewer time to reflect, whereas "Down Under" is bright and bombastic with a speedy pace, plenty of action scenes, and no pop soundtrack.
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