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Showing 1-10 of 62 reviews(4 star). See all 388 reviews
on May 16, 2016
This was the only book that helped me get through one of my screenwriting classes. I am not saying that it is the best book out there, but it is the only one that helped me through the basics of screenwriting.
1 helpful vote
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on January 22, 2016
Ok, this is used in a zillion writing/screenwriting classes and has all the hotshot writing instructors backing it. It's good, but also there's a degree of force-fitting individual existing literature to fit into the framework. Yes, the framework makes sense and works, no, I don't like The Wizard of Oz that much to be told repetitively to think that is an instance of mythic structure. I guess when there's the backing of big names.... But I did, on the other hand, find little to argue with,a nd it did help me with my own work.
1 helpful vote
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on October 26, 2017
This book really helps you develop your characters and writing style. Learning the hero's journey is the first step. Great book.
1 helpful vote
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on August 24, 2017
Informative and helpful.
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on November 4, 2012
This is a book about storytelling. We've all heard, read, or seen, stories told badly at one time or another, but few of us have been able to discern why we were disappointed in a production. Telling a story poorly is like telling a joke poorly. Yeah, the words are there, the premise and punch line are laid out, but it's just not funny... or interesting in the case of a story. This work is provides an understanding of the elements of a weel-told story, not as a template to be followed, or a strict set of rules, but as a philosophy, one that has been employed at least since Gilgamesh. Read it, then put it away. use the knowledge it has provided to mold the feeling of your tale. Your work will be better for it.
1 helpful vote
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on March 7, 2016
Though the underlying concept is based on Joseph Campbell's work, this book by Vogler is very useful for screenwriters since Vogler's in the industry. Also, correlating Vogler's work with Campbell's and other screenwriting "gurus" is, in itself, an informative exercise.
1 helpful vote
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on January 2, 2016
It comes off like a textbook. I love it and find it quite interesting, but that's because I find the subject matter interesting in itself. Someone not so zealous about story structure may find it extremely boring.
1 helpful vote
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on October 23, 2015
Useful for beginning writer. It introduces you to the basic story structure. However, it is a bit hard read and complex book, so do not expect a straightforward​ manual, this is more explanation of the theory behind story structure.
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on October 20, 2016
Absolutely necessary if you are a novelist or screenwriter. The Hero's journey is an incredibly useful primer on classic story telling.
A must read.
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I purchased this book in order to nudge the unravelling of a Gordian knot in an outline for a story idea of my own. Happily, it worked--and without having to use Alexander the Great's brute force solution.

Vogler uses Joseph Campbell's book "A Hero With a Thousand Faces", strips off most of the myth retelling and formulates a step-by-step process from Campbell's archetypes that will take your protagonist through the slice-of-life upon which your novel or screenplay centers.

You may get the impression that manipulating Vogler/Campbell's formula ensures some degree of commercial success, but that that success will be disappointingly routine, merely run-of-the-mill. Vogler says 'no'; the hero's journey in the hands of a capable writer can be as fresh, new and different as the film 'Pulp Fiction' is to the animated classic, 'The Lion King' (both films are used as examples in the appendix as to how the basic outline applies). In the first portion of the book, he supplies all of Campbell's hero archetypes with examples which thankfully move beyond Star Wars and the Indiana Jones Trilogy. In the second half of the book, he guides us through a generic hero's journey, providing a variety of options from which to springboard the story. At the end of each of the journey's legs, he analyzes "The Wizard of Oz" to illustrate a most masterful use of the outline and the archetypes.

If you are a writer or a student of film, this book 'Cliff-Notes' Campbell's classic. It provides a greater understanding of what an audience expects from a good story. If you want a book that again formulates an outline of the hero's journey in a 'how-to' fashion, take a look at "The Key" by Frey--this book is even more simplistic than Vogler's--Frey gets into developing character biographies before setting the hero on his journey, although his example is trite and almost silly.

I recommend the book because just reading it will set your mind thinking, sometimes with disgust at the formulas that you can see in all major films, but mostly with some grain of creativity that you can harvest to something special, not just marketable.
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