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Theology for a Scientific Age: Being and Becoming-Natural, Divine and Human (Theology and the Sciences) (Theology & the Sciences) Paperback – December 1, 1993

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Product Details

  • Series: Theology & the Sciences
  • Paperback: 452 pages
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Publishers; Enl Sub edition (December 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0800627598
  • ISBN-13: 978-0800627591
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,248,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Steven H Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on August 7, 2015
Format: Paperback
Arthur Robert Peacocke (1924 –2006) was an Anglican priest, theologian, and biochemist. He wrote many other books, such as Paths From Science Towards God: The End of all Our Exploring, Creation and the World of Science: The Re-Shaping of Belief, All That Is: A Naturalistic Faith for the Twenty-First Century, Evolution: The Disguised Friend of Faith?, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1990 book, “The understanding of the world which is evoked by the contemporary natural sciences is commonly taken in the West to be inimical to, or at least subversive of, religious belief in general and Christian belief in particular. I am convinced that this widely accepted view is mistaken and that the myth of the gulf between Christian theology and the natural sciences is debilitating to our culture while impoverishing the spiritual and personal life of the generations who have come to believe it. Study of this interaction… has impelled me to evolve a theology that has been refined… in the fires of the new perceptions of the world that the natural sciences have irreversibly established. Such a theology needs to be consonant with, though far from being derived from, scientific perspectives on the world.” (Pg.
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Format: Paperback
Arthur Robert Peacocke (1924 –2006) was an Anglican priest, theologian, and biochemist. He wrote many other books, such as Paths From Science Towards God: The End of all Our Exploring, Creation and the World of Science: The Re-Shaping of Belief, All That Is: A Naturalistic Faith for the Twenty-First Century, Evolution: The Disguised Friend of Faith?, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1990 book, “The understanding of the world which is evoked by the contemporary natural sciences is commonly taken in the West to be inimical to, or at least subversive of, religious belief in general and Christian belief in particular. I am convinced that this widely accepted view is mistaken and that the myth of the gulf between Christian theology and the natural sciences is debilitating to our culture while impoverishing the spiritual and personal life of the generations who have come to believe it. Study of this interaction… has impelled me to evolve a theology that has been refined… in the fires of the new perceptions of the world that the natural sciences have irreversibly established. Such a theology needs to be consonant with, though far from being derived from, scientific perspectives on the world.” (Pg.
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Format: Paperback
No amount of superlatives can do this book justice. The marvelous thing about it is that it addresses a huge range of topics - no stone is left unturned as Peacocke sticks very close to his purpose and analyzes what today's science means for theology. Topics discussed include sociobiology and morality, multiverses and imaginary time, philosophy of mind and science, theories of divine action, attributes of God, virgin birth, resurrection, Christology (incl. divinity of Christ), theories of atonement (he is sympathetic to Abelard's moral influence theory).

Let me reiterate that the strength of the book is that it leaves no stone unturned and provides a complete, coherent Christian worldview. I have read many books that only deal with, say, evolution or morality or philosophy of mind, but never all at the same time. As a result, my worldview was rather shaky, with some strong coherent parts but other views from traditional theology that are untenable in a scientific age. Peacocke addressed it all, from a basic argument for God to a precise analysis of the human problem (sin) and how Christ atones. It likely averted a crisis of faith.

One note: this same virtue means that many of your traditional beliefs will be challenged. I was very shocked and angry at times as *inter alia* (a favorite phrase of Peacocke, BTW; means "among other things") many miracles, the virgin birth, a literal adam and eve and thus a "paradisical" perfect state, an intrinsically immortal soul, and God's direct communication (not mediated by natural means) were all confronted head on, scientifically dismantled, and shown to be incoherent.
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