Automotive Deals HPCC Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Happy Belly Coffee Handmade school supplies Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer showtimemulti showtimemulti showtimemulti  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl Segway miniPro

There And Back

August 26, 1986 | Format: MP3

$6.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:58
30
2
2:57
30
3
4:04
30
4
5:47
30
5
4:01
30
6
4:55
30
7
5:05
30
8
3:39
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 26, 1986
  • Release Date: August 26, 1986
  • Label: Epic
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 35:26
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138F4GI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 64 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #41,030 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Many reviewers have written that while this album is great Jeff Beck, it's not his best. I tend to agree with that, however this album is definately worth the money.
Anyone familiar with the impressive You Had It Coming (Jeff's newest album) is aware that Jeff is stretching out into electronica territory. With "Star Cycle," he seems to have invented the genre 21 years earlier. A constant keyboard loop is played throughout the song as Mr. Beck executes Jan Hammer's melody perfectly as well as throwing in his usual amazing Beckisms during the solo(s). The next two Hammer tracks feature some great emotional playing by Jeff, but the melodies and Hammer solos do not seem to stack up as well. Perhaps the major fault here is There and Back does not seem to stand the test of time as well as other Jeff Beck albums. Nevertheless, one track that has stood the test is "The Pump." It is probably the standout of There and Back, and features great playing by the whole band. "The Golden Road" is a different story though. The track as a whole is not bad, however I seem to cringe everytime I hear the intro. As we move into "Space Boogie," it is probably the right time to mention that Simon Phillips is an awesome drummer on this album. Simon shines on this track, as does Jeff. The closing track, "The Final Peace," is worth honorable mention. This song features some of Jeff's most emotion playing and is considered by many to be the big brother of Guitar Shop's "Where Were You."
There and Back, while not Jeff Beck's best, is worth your money. You will not be disappointed.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Ask anyone who knows me, I'm the biggest Jeff Beck fan around. I'm serious. While There and Back is very good and is one of my favorite albums, it's not one of Jeff's best. It is, however, still worth to buy, because after all--It IS Jeff Beck. Anything with his name on is worth having.
The musicianship, however, is very good. Simon Philips is a great drummer and Tony Hymas does some nice keyboard playing. Jeff's playing is also very good, as always. However, I'm not sure I like all the tunes. The Pump, as stated previously, is the standout tune. Nowadays, it's even better when Jeff performs it live. Star Cycle is quite good, and You Never Know is also pretty strong. However, the other Hammer cut is not as strong as the other two.
Space Boogie and El Becko are fun tunes, and The Final Piece is full of emotion. However, some of the others sound a little too cheesy. Maybe it's the production sound, but it just doesn't sit with me.
Overall, this is worth buying, because Jeff Beck is the greatest guitarist ever, and his playing on most of There and Back is no exception. A good album...but not his best. For his best, check out You Had It Coming (2001), Guitar Shop (1989), Blow by Blow (1975), and Wired (1976).
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I got this album on vinyl, and on the first spin I was like "okay, well this is good" but didnt listen to it again for quite a while. The next time I heard it, as if by some delayed reaction, I thought "damn, this is AWESOME!". Jeff's guitar playing has the perfect blend of technique/feel/phrasing, but you expect that on even the weakest Jeff Beck album (not that any of his albums could be described as "weak"), brilliant playing is a given. But here, the leads, the melodies and the backing musicians are just outrageous! Its hard to pick favourite tracks, but I really like "Too Much To Lose", "Star Cycle", "The Pump"... Actually, they're all pretty great! This album is definetly up the the standard of "Blow By Blow" or "Wired", in my opinion at least.
2 Comments 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I agree with the other reviewer. Beck was definitely at his peak here, especially in all of his collaboration efforts with Jan Hammer. Hammer plays drums and keyboards on the first track. Simon Philips is awesome in his double-bass drum technique in the Boogie number. The Final Peace number predates some of the awesome echoplex guitar work that makes Steve Vai famous. As another drummer reviewing this album, this is Beck's BEST all-around effort; EVERYONE is in top form!
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I would agree with those who maintain that There & Back doesn't burn quite as brightly as its incandescent predecessors, Blow By Blow and Wired. Those staggering, George Martin-produced sessions brilliantly documented Beck's transition from late 60s English blues rock scholar into a 70s fusion giant. And while T&B isn't so concerned with tackling knotty jazz concepts, it has a breezy, relaxed quality that's impossible to resist.

Joined again by longtime sparring partner Jan Hammer, Beck kicks the album off with a string of Hammer tunes, which display not only the keyboard maestro's distinctive soloing chops but also his forward-thinking compositional style. "Star Cycle"'s metronomic sequencer motif presaged Beck's future dabblings with machines and loops (and foreshadowed Hammer's own Miami Vice theme by a few years!). It's not quite "Freeway Jam", but it's a lot of fun.

"Too Much to Lose" is more hummably melodic and features some lovely chord changes and "You Never Know" is just a classic-Beck, funky jam track a-la "Led Boots", which allows plenty of room for both Beck's whammy bar playfulness and Hammer's patented pitch-wheel flourishes, while drummer Simon Philips drives the train with a stomping double kick beat.

Perhaps There & Back's centerpiece, "The Pump" encapsulates the albums appeal, impressing as it does not with complexity but with understatement. Over a spare, simple groove courtesy of Philips and bassist Mo Foster (with supporting synth harmony courtesy of Tony Hymas, who would become intergral on future Beck outings), Jeff shows how evocatively a simple melody can be wrung from six strings. The notes drip with expression, sponteneity and personality, three words that perhaps describe Beck's genius best.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?