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Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach w/ version 1.2 CD ROM 4th Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0072549041
ISBN-10: 0072549041
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Yunus Cengel (Reno, Nevada) is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Michael Boles (Raleigh, NC) is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the North Carolina State University.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1056 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math; 4 edition (November 27, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0072549041
  • ISBN-13: 978-0072549041
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 1.2 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,305,349 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
To all eng thermo learners: i did an intensive comparison of Cengel4 and MoranShapiro5 whenever on the john. Sonntag6 was out-of-race: book really bad (in comparison to the two in question), so let's not talk about it any further. So the remaining top-sellers, they are *the* most widely-used most popular intro texts (the very first two semesters on thermo for engineering students) available; very comprehensive (~800pages) and extremely modern in didactics, layout, and content presentation. No wonder that they are the two best-sold intro texts. Question: which is better?
Results: Both are 100% equally top choices (and 95% equal in teaching text) and in the end it s only a matter of taste and peripheral preferences. My personal peripheral preference would be the "Which one s the better deal (US $)?". Well, MoranShapiro5 is a little harder to read (it uses one colour only: pics, drawings, and images all in GREEN, aarrgh!) and not as nicely layout as Cengel4. But text is a little more detailed and the examples are much longer, and a bit harder and thus more detailed too! Number of examples seems to be higher too (!?) ("So, if you re not a dummie (=total beginner), go for S/M as text and ref!"). Furthermore, the WileyInternationalEdition comes in HARDCOVER whereas the McGraw-HillInternationEdtion comes in PAPERBACK. Both books feature a student book companion site or online learning center. The Wiley book site has the fantastic "ThermoNet"-website, and instructors will find digitized solutions to all text problems. The McGraw-Hill book site does not offer much neither to the student nor to the instructor. Textwise, Cengel *is* better. Easier to read, grasp, learn, and understand. And apply ("So, the best thermo book for dummies is Cengel!").
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Format: Hardcover
This is a great textbook if you want a detailed explanation for all aspects of thermodynamics; however if you just want to know the basics you will probably get tired of this text quickly. The books greatest strength is it writing style which talks too the student, not above the student, in a down to earth way. This writing style can also be a weakness. Many have complained that they have to read through pages upon pages of prose just to get at a simple concept. There is also a lot of information on "special interest topics" which the busy junior engineering student may want to skip because of time. Even though a lot of the answers are given, you may spend a lot of trying to solve problems that have the wrong answer printed in the text, which is always annoying. In my opinion, if you learn on your own, and you want to really learn a lot, you are going to spend a lot of time reading this text. This is great if you have a poor instructor. If you just need to learn the basics, then you will have to skip the text and supplement with some sort of course outline book to save time.
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By A Customer on December 12, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Strength:
1)Introduces Thermodynamic in a understandable manner
2)All homework problems are engineering-related, allowing better grasp of knowledge
3)Helpful example problems with great illustrations and step-by-step explanation
4)There's a chapter summary of equations and conception throughout the book. This is great for test preparation.
5)Vivid analogies to convey abstract concepts such as entrophy, enthalpy, and exergy.
Weakness:
1)The book mainly covers Classical rather than statistical thermodynamics, which mean students in chem, physics, and chem engineering will not be fully prepared for future courses in thermodynamics
Overall, this is very good way to start thermodynamics, especially if this is the first time encountering thermo. However, if to continue to take more thermo, this book focuses main on engineering rather than other disciplines.
2 Comments 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Hardcover
This is an excelent book. Yanus Cengel & Michael Boles did a very good job. I have read the other reviews about it being too wordy. That is the case sometimes but not really enough to make things difficult. Although I appreciate the analogies and definitions for some topics. I have no idea if this book is good for review since I read it cover to cover. The suplimental paperback book with tables came in very handy. The one big problem though, is that it physically fell apart. The binding is done very poorly and I had to take back one book after I read chapter Four. The one I have now has been glued back together several times and I taped it with wide clear packing tape along the sides to keep it together. The text book is a keeper. Maybe McGraw Hill knows that and they want to sell duplicate copies to those who read it.
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Format: Hardcover
I have used this textbook for my engineering thermodynamics class and have found it to be a very interesting and straightforward text. Cengel and Boles begin with the basics and build up to more advanced topics. The problems in this text are challenging and reinforce concepts learned in previous chapters. Answers are included with some of the problems so that you can compare your answers when you finish. Examples are numerous and generally very helpful. However, this text has its drawbacks. The notation in the examples can be confusing and sometimes don't make mathematical sense. In addition, Cengel and Boles have a number of mistakes in the answers they provide. Despite these detractors, I definitely recommend this text for anyone wanting a solid introduction to engineering thermodynamics.
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