Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

They Came from the Bronx: How the Buffalo Were Saved from Extinction Hardcover – August 1, 2001

4.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$41.38 $0.49

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

His curiosity sparked by a childhood memory of hearing the Bronx Zoo's bison called "the Mother Herd," Waldman (Masada) here presents an articulate and informative volume recounting the animal's bittersweet history. The tale begins on an Oklahoma hilltop, where a Comanche boy asks his grandmother, "Tell me about the buffalo. What did they look like?" She assures him that he will soon see with his own eyes. From there the story unfolds in a series of scenes that flash between Oklahoma and turn-of-the-century New York City, where men load a herd of the creatures onto wagons and, eventually, onto a train headed back to the grandmother's hilltop, their "ancestral habitat." Throughout, the grandmother recounts to her grandson the glory days of the buffalo and their sad demise at the hands of white settlers. Waldman tracks the herd's progress as it crosses the country, drawing crowds of curious onlookers. He pairs his eloquent, sepia-toned watercolors--which have the look of old photographs--with black-and-white sketches, and subtly heightens the story's tension with the cinematic intersplicing of scenes. A historical note explains how 19th-century conservationists brought back the bison from the brink of extinction through the use of such seed herds, and they're now thriving on protected ranges across the country. Ages 7-up.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Gr 2-5-This picture-book slice of America's natural history defies classification. Waldman begins with a brief memoir about childhood visits to the Bronx Zoo and his curiosity about its "Mother Herd" of American bison. The heart of the book is a fictionalized recounting of the delivery of 15 of these animals from the zoo to the plains of Oklahoma in 1907. Double-page spreads alternate with the thoughts of a waiting Comanche boy and his grandmother and a description of the beasts' journey by horse-drawn wagon and train. The book concludes with a historical note about this particular event and other efforts in the late 1800s and early 1900s to return the buffalo to the western plains. The watercolor-and-ink drawings, almost entirely in shades of sepia, give the book the look of an old album. Readers may sense from the writing that Waldman was taken by the story of those bison traveling from the city zoo to the vast plains and was forced, by lack of factual data remaining from those days, to imagine the scene. He does this effectively in both text and illustration, which show signs of careful research into the period and locales. This title will work well as a read-aloud in studies of endangered species, westward expansion, and zoos. Desiree Webber's The Buffalo Train Ride (Eakin, 2001; o.p.) is nonfiction for older readers.

Ellen Heath, Orchard School, Ridgewood, NJ

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4
  • Lexile Measure: 770L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press; First Edition edition (August 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563978911
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563978913
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 11.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,050,136 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
80%
4 star
20%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I loved the poignant conversation between the old woman and her grandson. Her explanation of the disappearance of the buffalo builds to a very dramatic climax, that make us realize the seriousness of our country's past decisions. I reccommend this highly to anyone who cares about our past and future!
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
No other animal represents the American frontier like the American Bison. To Native Americans he was a spirit messenger, sacred to their very existence. To them and frontiersmen alike the thundering, shaggy beasts represented food, clothing, shelter and fuel. And in a larger sense the massive herds represented the spirit of freedom in a new and untouched land.
In They Came from the Bronx, Neil Waldman recounts the fascinating tale of how this quintessential American animal was brought back from extinction.
Waldman speaks of the Bronx Zoo's "Mother Herd," and his curiosity as a child with the name. How could a captive herd of bison in the largest American metropolis, so far from the wide-open spaces of the Great Plains, claim such a title?
Waldman's story weaves an eloquent account beginning in Oklahoma, stepping back to New York City in the early Nineteen hundreds, offers historical facts about the bison's prairie reign and then it's back to Oklahoma where a Comanche grandmother and her grandson await a most improbable reunion.
They Came from the Bronx is technically a children's book but will appeal to children of all ages, from one to ninety-three, if you will. Beautifully illustrated and written, the book speaks volumes about the tragedy of man's irresponsible exploitation of wildlife but also offers a ray of hope that once mistakes are made and recognized, if we are careful and responsible, they can and should be rectified.
Douglas McAllister
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have been reading this to our reading buddy class of third graders now for a few years... I first read it at our local library and choked up. It is good for lots of academic reasons but is also engaging and has an unusual style and amazing illustrations.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I first read this book in a gift shop at the San Diego Zoo. The message is even more potent because the story is true. This book is the well-done, beautifully illustrated story of bringing the American Buffalo back from the brink of extinction. The story is engaging without being "preachy." There's a lesson for the future here, too. As a third grade teacher, I'm planning on using this book in the classroom to reinforce the idea that human beings share the planet with other living creatures.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this as a gift for new babies in my extended family, based on Waldman's other stuff. It is a wonderful history lesson and poignant. Recommend this one!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse