Kindle Price: $2.99

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

They Cooked the Books: A Humorous Look at the World of White-Collar Crime by [Edwards, Patrick M.]
Kindle App Ad

They Cooked the Books: A Humorous Look at the World of White-Collar Crime Kindle Edition

2.5 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$2.99

Length: 208 pages Word Wise: Enabled

Barron's
Outsmart the market with Barron's digital membership. Only $12 for 12 weeks. > Learn more
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Review

Edwards presents a novel approach to the financial debacle....So many books analyzing America's financial meltdown have flooded the marketplace that they almost become indistinguishable, but Edwards' contribution stands out from the crowd. - Kirkus

About the Author

Patrick Edwards was born in Burbank, Ca. and spent his formative years in Southern California. After graduating from University High School in West Los Angeles, he joined the United States Coast Guard and served in a search and rescue capacity during the Vietnam War. In 1975, he graduated with a B.S. degree in Biological Sciences from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and went on to a distinguished 30-year career as a consultant in the pharmaceutical industry. Edwards is an accomplished speaker, having been a former member of Toastmasters International and enjoyed lecturing in the field of medicine on numerous occasions. He is founder and CEO of Big Island Publishers, LLC. His writing credits include columns, editorials, and a photo essay of Haleakala, the world’s largest dormant volcano, which is located on the island of Maui.

Product Details

  • File Size: 292 KB
  • Print Length: 208 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1466210737
  • Publisher: Big Island Publishers (August 31, 2011)
  • Publication Date: August 31, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005KGNOYS
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,295,483 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Larry Niven's "Known Space" stories contain an alien species called the "Piersen's Puppeteers" which considers cowardice to be a sign of intelligence. The brave remove themselves from the gene pool, and the cowardly are prized as breeding partners. The species generally has no sense of humor because humor is based in an interrupted defense mechanism, and what is intelligent about interrupting a defense mechanism?

Q: How many Republicans does it take to change a light bulb?
A: Republicans don't change light bulbs; it builds moral courage to sit in the dark.
Q: How many feminists does it take to change a light bulb?
A: Rhat's not funny!

This isn't a book of humor. Instead, it explores the origins of phrases used to describe financial shenanigans,

It's not a particularly good book in that regard. For instance, in discussing the phrase "cook the books", it would seem relevant that financial reports are produced from raw data. Is that a back-formation, or did the expression come from poorly cooking the raw data? He says the original term comes from scaling recipes in a cookbook to make greater or lesser batches, and doesn't explain how that phrase would come to imply dishonesty.

But poorly done etymology would be entertaining, if it were actually entertaining. A fairly good barometer of whether a joke is funny is if the target finds it as funny as those who hate the target. In this book, Patrick Edwards tells lots of stories about those who have gotten caught in fraud, etc., and escaped being meaningfully punished for it. Those who have been exposed but not punished don't think it funny that they've been exposed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not even remotely humorous. A disjointed, blandly written history of expressions of speech people use when describing financial crimes. If you ever wanted to know where the expression "above the law" comes from, this is your book. If you are interested in reading about financial shenanigans, look elsewhere. Maybe some English professor somewhere would enjoy this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
When thinking about white-collar crime, the first perpetrators that might come to mind are Wall Street, corporations and high-profile snakes like Bernie Madoff. Yet in They Cooked the Books, author Patrick M. Edwards has taken an entirely different approach.

"They Cooked the Books" is written in fifteen parts, with each section casting a metaphorical and honest light on the origins, original meanings and present day usage of sayings related to financial doings (legal and otherwise). Turns out financial folly and deception is not something that the 20th or 21st century can take sole credit for when considering phrases such as, "A wolf in sheep's clothing", in which the Bible quotes Jesus as making reference to "...false prophets...in sheep's clothing."

Many casual sayings that Edwards provides background on are in constant use today. If a person is gullible and easily believes what is told to them, the pat response is usually "If you believe that, than I have a bridge to sell you", which is precisely where the term "They could sell you the Brooklyn Bridge" comes from, originating in America in the first half of the 20th century.

The term "Poor as a church mouse" dates back to the 1600's, and simply meant that if a mouse were to get trapped in a church, it would surely starve to death. When prisoners were beaten and tortured in South Africa, it was Nelson Mandela who said that he would take his abuser to the highest court in the land.

"By the time I am finished with you, you will be as poor as a church mouse." The guard left him alone, proving that there has always been power behind many of the idioms that Edwards' references.

Edwards has done a thorough job at unmasking the meaning of many phrases that Americans and others freely use today.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

They Cooked the Books: A Humorous Look at the World of White-Collar Crime
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: They Cooked the Books: A Humorous Look at the World of White-Collar Crime