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Showing 1-10 of 3,041 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 4,378 reviews
on April 6, 2017
This was a reread for me and I'm so glad I dived back in it. I first fell in love with this story in high school. For the longest time it was the only representation I had for mental illness, I connected with a dead girl because she had so many emotions I also shared sometimes to my own fright. Hannah's story is tragic and heartbreaking. The ending always shook me because she wasn't coming back, you had such a strong narrator for these tragedies but she wasn't going to get up and say ha! It's all a joke. She was gone, and that is one of the reasons I always came back to this book. I needed to know she was gone, that is the outcome of suicide that I didn't want to see at 17, your story is finished. Now as an adult reading it, it's still heartbreaking and terribly tragic and I still connect so strongly to this story. I loved this book and will always love this book. I read more into it now than what I did then. Clay was the perfect perspective to put it in because I can't think good things about any of the other characters, as hard as the tv show wants you too. The tv show has recently released on Netflix and they've changed so much from the original book and part of me wonders is if it's to make it make more sense. The thing is, suicide doesn't make sense. That tragic act doesn't have to make sense. It's sad and scary, and we will ever understand even with 13 separate and valid reasons, it still doesn't make sense. One this book did such a good job of showing is how small things, things we think inconsequential, can be detrimental to someone else. Something as simple as not saying goodbye given the opportunity, can change how someone feels. Now does this mean we have to walk on egg shells? No, that actually impossible. It means watch what your doing basically. If your having a bad day it isn't okay to take it out on someone else, we can control the small things so the big things won't spiral. This book will always hold a special place in my heart, and I'm sure once the shock of the show wears off it will too. I needed to reread this book, it's good to remember what we do and who we are matters. Even when you think you don't matter and no one would care, you do matter. You matter so much! ❤️
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on May 2, 2017
I don't know what I can say about this book that hasn't already been said. I read it after watching the Netflix series, and while there are definitely differences between the two, the combination left me reeling. It is deeply moving, poignant, and yet one of the most hopeful books I've ever read.

The story revolves around Clay, who finds a box of cassette tapes waiting on his doorstep one day. As he listens to them, he is drawn into the story of Hannah, his crush that committed suicide just a couple weeks earlier. The tapes share the thirteen reasons why she made the choice that she did, one for each person that contributed to that decision.

On the surface, it sounds like a horrifying premise for a read. It is a tough read at times, but no less important. Her point of creating the tapes, to be passed to each person on them, was not to be cruel. It was to make a point... the point that how we act toward one another, whether deliberate or not, makes a difference. Any one of those acts can be small in and of itself, but they can add up to push a person over the edge.

Having seen the series and read the book, I have to say something I never thought I would. As much as I loved the book, I felt that the series really showed Hannah's angst just a bit more clearly. Admittedly, some of that was accomplished through changes in the plot and some details. Ideally, I would suggest indulging in both.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon May 7, 2017
"Thirteen Reasons Why" is a novel that examines teen angst, bullying, suicide, and relationships, in the context of a story about a conflicted high school girl who chose to end her life, rather than continue confronting classmates whom she perceived to be her tormentors. This book very effectively emphasizes the critical importance of parental vigilance and empathy, with regard to the tremendous peer pressure and anxiety experienced by many teenage children, which, in the extreme, can lead to tragedy. It is such a valuable contribution to teenage literature because it reminds its readers of the overarching importance of maintaining open lines of communication between teenagers, their parents, their teachers, and their friends and classmates. It also highlights the fundamental relationship principle that an individual should treat everyone whom they encounter with the same respect and dignity that they would expect to experience in their interpersonal interactions. "Thirteen Reasons Why" is an excellent novel, which is relevant for readers of all ages, and which merits a five-star rating, along with a strong recommendation.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon May 4, 2017
"Thirteen Reasons Why" is a novel that examines teen angst, bullying, suicide, and relationships, in the context of a story about a conflicted high school girl who chose to end her life, rather than continue confronting classmates whom she perceived to be her tormentors. This book very effectively emphasizes the critical importance of parental vigilance and empathy, with regard to the tremendous peer pressure and anxiety experienced by many teenage children, which, in the extreme, can lead to tragedy. It is such a valuable contribution to teenage literature because it reminds its readers of the overarching importance of maintaining open lines of communication between teenagers, their parents, their teachers, and their friends and classmates. It also highlights the fundamental relationship principle that an individual should treat everyone whom they encounter with the same respect and dignity that they would expect to experience in their interpersonal interactions. "Thirteen Reasons Why" is an excellent novel, which is relevant for readers of all ages, and which merits a five-star rating, along with a strong recommendation.
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on May 18, 2017
OMG..this book had my emotions going wild and all over the place. i dont see how anyone can say this book glorify suicide. what i saw, what i read in this book was the story of a young girl who was hurting. She was broken and thought she was alone. after being bullied, lied to and betrayed by people she once trusted she though everyone would do the same to her. while reading this book i cried, smiled and even screamed a little. its def a most read!❤💔
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on July 3, 2017
This book was an honest look at the downward spiral of depression and how it led to suicide. This was a brilliantly written book. At first I felt it was too contrived with the notion of Hannah creating a long winded series of tapes that explains in great detail who wronged her and what led to her ending her life. But in truth, it was a brilliant way of her telling you her story as she walks you through her life spinning out of control, and you are experiencing it with Clay, the young man who loved her and is in shock and horror at how it is unfolding. Two of the most signicant aspects of this sad story is that it does show how depression can make someone feel hopeless, even when there are people who care and could help, but the darkness of depression clouds the persons perspective, sometimes egging them on to continue spiraling downward.

Hannah is a very pretty high school girl, new to the neighborhood, with good parents and wanting all the normal things a healthy teen wants, to find friends and fall in love. And as she explains what happened, the first boy she really cared about and kissed, made up rumors he spread around the school that she gave much more than a kiss. What started for her as a wonderful first love, quickly turned into guys hitting on her for all the wrong reasons, one guy grabbing her ass in public, another guy peeping in her windows, another guy creating a list of the hot girls in school, that pits her against her best girl friend, ruining yet another important anchor in her life. As she explains how her world started deteriorating and she gets more and more isolated and depressed, her thoughts turn darker. As this happens she begins to push even good opportunities aside, people who could help her, like Clay, as if she is sealing her own fate. I don't want to give away any more of the story, but the story really shows how depression can have a snowball effect, which they mention in the book, and how people can be harsh and even mean in perpetuating someone's depression, trying to hit oh Hannah right after bad things happen, like one boy named Zach, who tries to hit on her as she is reeling from just having been sexually assaulted.

An important aspect of the book is that it shows the affects that suicide has on those left behind, the confusion and guilt and deep sadness that are the ripple effects of their actions. Clay loved Hannah, and with him we experience not only depression and guilt, but also anger because she pushed him away, not allowing him to help. And we see, at the end, even when she reaches out to Her advisor at school, though he is not doing a great job understanding, he is trying, and she seems to have already made up her mind and pushes away any help he may have been able to give.

This book looks at depression and suicide in a fairly honest and candid way, and it is tragic, like it is real life. It is not book to take lightly, and I hope for anyone reading it who may suffer from similar feelings that they will see that Hannah could have taken a different path and allowed people to help her. She could have made different choices at the end, and that her depression clouded her choice making. That is one of the really important aspects that the author lets you see, and which makes the story that much more tragic.
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on May 25, 2017
I'm not saying I regret buying this book, but it is so controversial to my Christian beliefs and I was sooooo saddened that she couldn't talk to anyone but her tape recorder. If she would have been as honest with a professional councilor, I would like to think she could have been helped. I will not watch the movie. I can compartmentalize books, but not things I actually see. I'm sure the author just wanted to show another "side" to suicide, and this book certainly made a statement.
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on May 8, 2017
I did not hear about this novel until after I say the trailer on Netflix. During me viewing the trailer I noticed it derived from a book and we all know the book 95% of the time has more details than a series or movie. However, this was different. The story was very detailed paying close attention (in my opinion) to three characters. As for the series on Netflix, it focused more on the effects of everyone while still paying attention to those three characters. I would definitely recommend reading Thirteen Reasons Why even if the series was already viewed.
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on August 1, 2017
Some people say that Thirteen Reasons Why glamorizes suicide.

In the novel, Hannah Baker takes her life and leaves behind cassette tapes that retrace her steps and explain her reasons.

There is never a moment I envy Hannah Baker or want to be her—before, during, or after. What happened to her seemed anything but glamorous.I’d go so far as to say the story makes it clear that taking your life is not the solution; that there is always hope. A few minutes, days, or weeks could make all the difference in the world.

TRW also makes me glad I went to an all-girl high school. I didn’t have to put up with that crap—at least not in school. The book provides good examples of how not to behave, how not to treat others. It also brings to light how little thought teens give to how their behavior may affect someone else, although, this is sadly true of adults as well.

That’s one of the messages in Thirteen Reasons Why. We need to be kinder to each other.

No doubt, some people will read this book and see it all differently. They’ll see that Hannah is talked about more and with more sensitivity after her death. They’ll see that people feel guilty. They may think that would bring satisfaction, but true bullies who destroy other human beings are not usually the ones who feel guilty. They don’t have consciences.

To a lesser degree, Hannah Baker lacks empathy herself in this story and is rather self-absorbed. That’s okay. Victims don’t need to be depicted as saints. A character can be tragically flawed in fact, and still not deserve the torment. It is normal for a trauma survivor to go through a period of victimhood that includes a great deal of introspection and a degree of self-pity. She has a human response to a rude and painful awakening. Yes, trauma does quite a number on the psyche. It changes a person, causing behavior that won’t make sense even to the survivor. The point is, what happened to Hannah Baker should not have happened to anyone. It’s sad that she’ll never have the chance to heal and evolve beyond what she became, so it’s a story worth telling and worth telling right.

I'm willing to bet that most of us can make a list of at least thirteen people who screwed us over and/or possibly scarred us for life. Some of those reasons might be the same or worse than what Hannah Baker experienced, but, for most of us, suicide was never an option we considered.

We are all different. We have varying degrees of ability to cope, and those who are coping may be at less challenging stages of the healing process. For some of us, a burden is a challenge, and we push back. No matter what, we keep pushing. But not everyone can do that. It’s not weakness, and it’s not for lack of trying. We are where we are. None of us have control over the circumstances we are born into or everything that happens after that. We can’t be sure why we take the paths we take or what we need to learn. Healing begins when we are ready. It’s a long, grueling process that, unfortunately, some people will never begin.

I think it's safe to say that Thirteen Reasons Why will be triggering for certain people and not others.

There’s always a chance that any one of us will find something we read, see, hear, or experience to be triggering. But we can’t shy away from controversial subjects or prevent others from having those important conversations. For those wanting to sue and to ban, do we want to set that precedent? Where would we draw the line? Would we have to stop talking about rape, about murder, about mental issues, and about everything that could be triggering? I hope not!

Thirteen Reasons Why focuses on raising the level of awareness for bullying/harassment/character assassination, etc. and depicting how the victim feels—how a suicide victim feels. Hannah, in my opinion, sought to educate the culprits. She may have wanted them to feel her pain, too, but more for their benefit, I think, than in retaliation. As a trauma survivor, I can relate to wanting to raise the level of awareness. Even if the people who need to hear it most are not listening, someone is. And making a difference to anyone at all is a great start.

In light of the above, and because it is a profound experience for the reader, I give Thirteen Reasons Why five stars. I felt like a part of the story, swept right in and completely absorbed, turning page after page. I loved the powerful descriptions of how the characters felt in critical moments. The book, beautifully written and straight from the heart, shows compassion in abundance, and it brought me to tears.

Co-protagonist, Clay Jensen, in fact, shows considerable empathy while listening to Hannah’s tapes. He wants to understand what happened to Hannah. He not only forces himself to listen to every excruciatingly painful word—he follows her instructions, putting himself in her place and allowing himself to feel what she felt.

Imagine living in a world where everyone sought to understand one another like that!

That would be beautiful indeed!
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on June 28, 2017
Typically I am a firm believer that the book is always better than the movie but in this particular instance it's the total opposite. I watched the series first and was so drawn into the story that I stayed up until 2am to finish the whole show in one night, the complex nature of the events that ultimately led to Hannah's suicide were shocking, numbing, and all too real in this day and age. What the series made you see and feel the book lacked. I was disappointed that Clay did not act as he did in the movie, instead his character weakly listened and passed on the tapes....there was none of the complexity of the interwoven circle of friends, Hannah's parents, the investigation into the lack of the school protecting the bullied kid, or Clay seeking redemption on Hannah's behalf now that they all know the truth instead of the rumors. For me the series gets 5 Stars but the book is lacking so only 3 Stars.
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