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on April 1, 1999
As an acquaintance of Andrew Cunanan and one of his victims, and as a longtime denizen of at least one of his social worlds, I can recommend this book without reservation. "Three Month Fever" is a far wiser book than Maureen Orth's "Vulgar Favors," which catalogs a lot of already known facts but suffers enormously from that author's cluelessness about gay life, drugs, BDSM, and "addictive pornography." Even at its most speculative, Indiana's book is eminently credible. What's more, it's often deliciously darkly humorous. If you want directions to the Mall of America, buy a road map. This book tells the larger truth about us all.
6 helpful votes
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on January 10, 2002
Who could not remember the bizaare tell of the great homosexual flirt of South Miami's slaying of a fashion icon? It's so bizaare, so unreal, it reeks of Coen brothers. As they say - only in America.
The Cunanan story is fascinating. Rightly, Indiana adopts an almost dandy-esque
"In Cold Blood" interpretation of the story. What's even better is that there is a whole reference to the subtext of the love of fame. Oftentimes Indiana uses Cunanan as an interlocutor in a discourse about fame and the love thereof.
I'll not forget Indiana writing that Cunanan had confused fame and existence.
When humans muddle this distinction and construct artificial masque upon artifical masque a fascinating subject of psychological study is born.
Highly recommended.
2 helpful votes
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on April 2, 1999
All writing on the Andrew Cunanan story has been wildly subjective, and always from a straight point of view (straight as in straight-laced as well as hetero). Three Month Fever is as subjective as the TV reporting on Cunanan's crime spree was, but instead of hysteria, it's infused with compassion. The author assumes a certain amount of knowledge of the case on the readers' part, and acknowledges that he makes many extreme leaps of imagination. If you have followed the case, these leaps are thrilling--they give voice to things you have inevitably wondered about yet which a conventional journalist would not be allowed to discuss. If you have no imagination and hate to see someone else use theirs, try VULGAR FAVORS or even DEATH AT EVERY STOP.
2 helpful votes
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on January 30, 2000
When I first saw this book on the market, I didn't purchase it, the reason being that I had just completed another book on Andrew Cunanan and didn't want more of the same. I'm so glad that I had second thoughts. Reading true crime books for about 15 years, my greatest interest is in finding out what forces came together to create this crime. On that point, the author hit the "nail right on the head". Only someone gifted in the knowledge of human nature could have seen this story so clearly. I walked away from this book feeling that I knew Andrew Cunanan completely. If you are the type of person who remembers that murders are "human beings" also, then this is one book you won't want to miss.
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on July 13, 1999
Indiana's book does show some intelligence behind it, but it seems in the end to want to make a kind of tragic hero out of Cunanan, a somewhat appalling decision in light of the multiple murders. The tabloid media's obsession with Cunanan's partygoing lifestyle is certainly lamentable, but it does not in any way take away from the enormity of Cunanan's crimes, or make them less despicable. And we receive very little information about Cunanan's victims or their lives away from him.
The book, as many have pointed out, is poorly researched. It seems as if there still is a need for a book more intelligently researched and objective than Indiana's but more aware of the realities of life in the gay ghettoes than Orth's.
7 helpful votes
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on June 26, 1999
Those who fault "Three Month Fever" for the author's "poor research" are missing the point -- this is less a true crime book than a personal meditation on the Cunanan episode and its relation to the current media climate of overblown sensationalism. Indiana is no Maureen Orth, but then again, who wants him to be? I'd rather read a creative interpretation on this moment in American crime history than Orth's obsessively detailed summary of the "facts" anyday. Treat this book more as something which lies somewhere between fact and fiction (a la "In Cold Blood") and you won't be disappointed.
4 helpful votes
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on October 26, 2005
I was interested in Andrew Cunanan, objectively and with no judgement to how he was percieved on tv. I was hoping that this book would give some factual insight into what initiated the "3 month fever", but found this book terribly difficult to read. Not just that, most of the book has "conversions" between dead killer and dead victim, written in italics, as if that is what transpired between them - like the author actually interviewed them or something. Where the hell did he get these "conversations" that clearly could NOT be true, almost insisting that is what truly occured. MOST of the book is written this way - some fantasy conversation the author thought to himself perhaps?

The thing that made this book so impossible to read was Indiana's writing style. He starts out painfully annoying, describing everything to death - way too many metaphors used. Sentences that ran on and on for pages (not making this up). It was like some grad student attempting to write in a "different" kind of writing style to show off, instead of doing the subject some justice and writing facts - did he run out of facts because he barely interviewed anyone??? Then toward the end, he rushes through everything - the details of the 3 months are only just a few pages long while the rest of the BS runs chapter upon chapter!

Overall, it was annoying to read and the reader NEVER finds the motive behind this man. Not even possible motives. Just ramblings of what Cunanan may have said to himself or to others, none of which can be proven to be true. Total waste of time!
9 helpful votes
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on May 4, 2001
Gary Indiana's THREE MONTH FEVER effectively explains the grotesque phenomenon of Andrew Cunanan, an incredibly narcissistic 27-year-old gay prostitute, pathological liar, party-boy, and all around hustler and parasite. After almost a decade of full-throttle decadence, the sybaritic Cunanan discovered that he had run out of money, credit, and friends to con. His response: a protracted homicidal tantrum that left six people dead (including himself). A grimly fascinating saga, only flawed by Indiana's excessive empathy for a moral monster.
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on July 6, 2000
All of your opinions are valid, but your unjustly putting this book of fictionalized reality into a catagory it has no interest in competing in. Indiana is a sharp satirist with the ability to make connections bwt Cunannan's murder spree and America's compulsion to consume everything about death and destruction as edu-tainment. If anything, the reason so many were annoyed but the lack of 'facts' in this bok, isbecause they are the audience Indiana is skewering. PS - As for facts, the 'other' book, "Vulgar Favors" is worse. Orth is a hollywood wife with a vivid imagination and bias against sexual exploration. Her book is way more fabricated then this and is passed off as journalism.
6 helpful votes
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on December 22, 2002
An odd, book, best termed fantasy based heavily on research.
Witty and true to the voice of what we know about Cunanan and the scenes he was in. I recommend you read this after reading everything else - Maureen Orth's book, all the articles, and seeing the A and E biography on Andrew. With that as perspective, you can see how Indiana falls into place true to
voice. I know alot of people didn't like this book, but I think you have to be willing to take it for what it is to get it.
And I do advise you get it....
3 helpful votes
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