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Thunder and Steel (Warhammer Omnibus) Paperback – February 1, 2011

3.9 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dan Abnett's work for the Black Library includes the best-selling Gaunt's Ghosts novels, the Inquisitor Eisenhorn and Ravenor trilogies, and the aclaimed Horus Heresy novel, Horus Rising.
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Product Details

  • Series: Warhammer Omnibus
  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Games Workshop; Original edition (February 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849700230
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849700238
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #379,279 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The fantasy warhammer universe is just as deserving of praise as the 40,000 series, in this collection of stories you have the typical sense of doom that pervades both series and the struggle of characters to survive for just another day. The stories included are: Gilead's Blood, Hammers of Ulric, and The Riders of the Dead. The first deals a elf on a hunt for vengeance and is a collection of several tales that make for a enjoyable read. The other two deal with the fores of the empire fighting against chaos. Hammers of Ulric deals with a smaller conflict against chaos but with the fate of one of the most important cities of the empire at stake! The Riders of the Dead deals with a major chaos invasion and how the more menacing threat of chaos is the conversion to chaos worship and not the threat of marauding armies. The story is told between two characters who were once comrades but reunite as foes in battle far from the Empire. There is also a graphic novel included that deals with the many owners of a cursed warhammer. A great read for old fans and new of the Warhammer universe!
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I'm a fan of the Black Library, though if I had a complaint its that they're extremely focuses on the 40K setting, while Fantasy seemingly gets the shaft. But its all about what sells, so I understand it to an extent. I stumbled onto this omnibus looking for books dealing with the Fantasy setting and decided to give it a shot.

It is broken into three books, Gilead's Blood, Hammers of Ulric, and The Riders of the Dead. After these three there is a pair of short stories and brief graphic novel. The two stories are fun reads, though the comic, The Warhammer, was kind of weak. Might look better in full color though.

Gilead's Blood
This book starts rather slowly, but picks up steam toward a very climactic final chapter. The focus is on the Elf Prince Gilead and his stewart as they journey around the Old World. They have dealings with many races and factions in their travels and the stories are told from the perspective of a storyteller in a tavern. Most of the stories I would rate from fair to good, but the final chapter is quite a fun climax to the book.

Hammers of Ulric
The author describes writting this book as if he were writing for a team of superheroes. The action in this book is more varied, as it shifts from war novel to murder mystery and back again. The knights of Ulric make for fearsome warriors, but my favorite parts were chapters told from the perspective of a priest of Morr, a caretaker of the dead. The seemingly unconnected adventures in the book gradually unveil a grand conspiracy to destroy the city of Middenheim and it falls on the characters to join together and save the day. This book was so much fun to read and probably my favorite of the three.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I could not get into this book. The writing is just not there for me it feels like every story is the same and the characters are not deep.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My first copy came with a hundred pages missing in the middle. What a surprise, but Amazon replaced it right away.

Several of the stories stand alone, and others are part of a group but can be read separately. These are all the medieval Warhammer universe, no Astartes, Imperial Guard, or bolters. Everything is horseback and blades or hammers. I felt that the middle stories dealing with the White Wolves of Middenheim were the best. The others were a little overlong or not so good.
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