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The Tiger Skin Rug Library Binding – February, 1979

4.9 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Library Binding, February, 1979
$110.74 $5.98

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Editorial Reviews

Review

'Gerald Rose at his brilliant best. "Welcome Back, Tiger!"' Michael Foreman 'This is a flawless example of how pictures tell one story and words tell it differently' Julia Eccelshare 'This is no ordinary picture book, but a terrific read aloud book with deft comic touches and intensely funny illustrations' The Bookseller, Marilyn Brocklehurst 'An absolute joy ... This is a perfect picture book to reissue; a whole host of new readers will fall in love with the charismatic tiger and delight in the happy ending' The Bookseller, Vanessa Lewis --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Gerald Rose was born in Hong Kong. When the Second World War started, his father became a prisoner of war, and Gerald and his mother were interned in a civilian camp, which was where he saw his first live tiger.

Gerald studied at Lowestoft School of Art and the RA schools. Frustrated by the dearth of good illustrated books for children, his wife, Elizabeth, helped him to write and illustrate a number of books. Gerald won the Kate Greenaway Medal in 1960 for Old Winkle and the Seagulls and won the Premio Critici in 1979 in Erba, Italy for 'Ahhh!' Said Stork. Gerald now lives in Hove, East Sussex.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Library Binding: 30 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall (February 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0139215859
  • ISBN-13: 978-0139215858
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 7.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,082,228 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is such a fine item. It brings a smile to everyone that reads it. It is a story that you go back to time after time. Don't miss this one!

For would-be authors of children literature, this book contains all the elements necessary to write a successful child's book. Folks can tell you how to write a book, but you can actually read a book that was written the way a book was meant to be written.
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Format: Kindle Edition
In two minds about this one. Engaging, great drawings, good story arc. Written in the late '70's so at one of those points when anyone with a political correctness agenda had a big red rubber stamp whacked on their forehead reading 'not normal'.

Story is about a tiger who chameleons his way into the Rajah's palace because he can no longer survive in the wild because he is past working age. That's cool: we all get to that point at some stage, whether physically or mentally and it's great that he finds a home when there is no tiger pension available....because...well because in the '70's all the tigers were already dead. Not preaching or anything...well, yes I am...tigers in the wild went from 100 000 at the beginning of last century to less than 4000 in the '70's and three whole sub-types out of eight were made extinct. Why? Because people wanted to grind up their bones for medicines and their skins also made an impressive rug.

I am going to give the benefit of the doubt on this one and say Rose is doing the tiger a justice by making him a clever hero in this story. A hero who has to go above and beyond to prove his worthiness of existence like all unappreciated beings. The story is good drama-wise and yet I still feel for the discarded old remnants of a hunted rug.

The drawings are great.

Gerald Rose has illustrated around fifty books. He started out as a husband and wife team with his writer-wife Elizabeth...which irks me that Gerald has multiple internet references and I cannot find one on his wife who wrote a dozen of the books they made as a team starting out...including Old Winkle and the Seagulls...another uncool politically incorrect blunder...shame to publishers who dismiss the source of their bread and butter...
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the most adorable book about a skinny tiger who gets a chance to live in the lap of luxury at a rajah's palace. Or maybe I should say the floor of luxury, as he masquerades as a rug. The pictures are beautiful and show the tiger in all his lack of glory as he lives the life of a rug. I'm an elementary schoolteacher, and my kids love reading this story and looking at the pictures. There are no big words to stump them, they enjoy the family life portrayed, and the ending is sure to make children of all ages smile. If you have small children, don't miss this one.
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Format: Library Binding
This classic story of an aging and sad tiger who pretends to be a rug is a classic, and the pictures in this great little book will amuse readers of all ages.
An overlooked classic.
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Format: Library Binding
This is my husband's favourite children's book - discovered when he was 35! It is the story of an elderly starving tiger, who decides to masquerade as a tiger skin rug in order to access the table scraps of the Maharaja's family, and therefore live a little longer. In the process he saves the life of the Maharaja, and becomes a much loved member of the family.
It is an utterly delightful story. The tiger is appropriately tatty and dejected, but after several night time munchings and days as a rug he becomes fatter and sleeker, and the family speculate endlessly on how the old rug seems to be improving with age.
The book is wonderfully illustrated, and just a joy to share with children who can all feel for the poor tiger. It may well be my husband's favourite - it is also one of mine as well.
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Format: Library Binding
I first read another of Gerald Rose's books; Horrible Hair' to my children, and over several months had to read it again and again, it was so popular. I had never written to an author before, but wanted to let him know how much my children had enjoyed it. He very kindly wrote a lovely reply, and I was directed to another of his books, The Tiger Skin Rug. This has proved just as popular. It is a brilliant piece of writing and as usual his illustrations are wonderful. Highly recommended for parents as well as the children.
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