Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$4.16
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: A well-cared-for item that has seen limited use but remains in great condition. The item is complete, unmarked, and undamaged, but may show some limited signs of wear. Item works perfectly. Pages and dust cover are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine is undamaged.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Time in History: Views of Time from Prehistory to the Present Day Hardcover – 2004

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$16.92 $0.01

Springer featured resources in physics
Discover featured physics titles from Springer
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Barnes & Noble; First Edition edition (2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0760755493
  • ISBN-13: 978-0760755495
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,761,862 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is a fascinating history of time and the way we measure it in the West. Whitrow covers just about every topic one would expect connected to our concepts of time beginning with the evidence of Prehistory and extending to contemporary physics and philosophy.
My favorite parts are those dealing with the creation of the calendar and the ways that were developed for dividing up the day in the Hellenistic world. I had always taken the names of the months and the length of days in each pretty much for granted, but Whitrow goes into detail about how the egos of the Roman Emperors forced a renumbering of the months so that Augustus could have his month on the calendar have as many days as any other. I had never realized that July was named for Julius and August for Augustus. Whitrow also covers the development and refinement of the calendar over the centuries, and why their was the need for the Gregorian calendar to replace the Julian, and the former's gradual acceptance by all the world.
There is also discussion of the problems of clocks, of the various types, and their development. And special kinds of clocks are covered as well, such as John Harrison's that was recounted in greater detail in Sobel's LONGITUDE.
I strongly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in how the Western world has developed its ways of thinking about time and how to measure it. Since these concepts undergird virtually everything that happens in our culture, it deals with exceedingly fundamental concepts indeed.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I had always been curious as to the origin of our calendar, our timing system etc. This book presents a very good introduction to this, and also to the changes in the perception and importance of time to different societies throughout history. It is a good introduction though, and not a book for academic research.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Many important questions in history and philosophy implicate some conception of time. Likewise, the study of historical events requires some background knowledge of calendars, seasons and holidays. Perhaps for this reason I find myself picking up G. J. Whitrow's TIME IN HISTORY every couple of years and rereading all or part of it. It serves as an admirable refresher to issues that keep popping up.

Whitrow starts with a general discussion of time. Children develop a sense of time gradually. Many primitive cultures have not developed a vocabulary that allows them to distinguish periods of time with any precision.

Whitrow next surveys conceptions of time in various cultures and historical epochs. The creation accounts in different religions all contain some conception of time. Although Western Civilization is generally forward looking, there is a strong conservative tendency as well. As Whithrow points out, the Romans looked with suspicion on something that was a "novelty."

At the end of the book he reviews theories of progress and change, such as those advanced by Bury, Spengler and Toynbee. He also discusses the scientific theories of Leibniz, Newtown and Einstein and the various theories of time involved with each.

For a moderately sized book it is quite comprehensive. To take just one example, Whitrow provides an overview of the controversy surrounding New Testament scholar Oscar Cullman's theory of time in the Judeo-Christian world.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Pity that they don't have this in electronic format... Very very informative, covers the concepts and attitudes humanity has held regarding time and measuring it from the dawn of civilization until roughly the modern renaissance. Covers not only the mechanical devices used, but also various calendars, holidays, and other interesting trivia and tidbits that paint a very broad and satisfying overall picture of the subject. If you're doing research on calendars, clocks or timekeeping for scholastic or personal reasons, I recommend this highly. The best I've found on the subject in years, considering how concise it is.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse