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Time Present, Time Past: A Memoir by [Bradley, Bill]
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Time Present, Time Past: A Memoir Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Length: 475 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The political autobiography of the former New Jersey senator and former New York Knick, an eight-week PW bestseller, features a new afterword by the author.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Part autobiography, part political position paper, this audio memoir is an abridged version of the author's book of the same title (LJ 1/96). Bradley, a U.S. senator from New Jersey, describes his childhood in small-town Missouri, his decision to attend Princeton, and his ten-year professional basketball career with the New York Knicks. Having achieved fame, he then started his political career, winning election to three terms in the Senate. Bradley reads well enough but at times sounds as if he has given the same political speech too many times; he reels off catch phrases so quickly that their meaning is sometimes lost. Too bad, because his theme of combining government action with personal responsibility is interesting. Overall, this is a good title for public affairs, biography, or political science collections.
Luana Ellis, Jamestown Community Coll. Lib., Olean, N.Y.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 4468 KB
  • Print Length: 475 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (April 22, 2010)
  • Publication Date: May 5, 2010
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003EWAPYM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,585,253 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I expected "Time Present, Time Past" to be a typical political autobiography- a lame rehash of old battles with the author steadfastly skiewing events in his favor, and then lying out a few vauge ideas about "making America better". Instead, I was treated to a very intelligent book wherein the author talked about real people and real stories of his growing up. Bradley's candid frustration at being able to unlock the machinery of government and his lack of arrogance is a refreshing change. This book is altogether poignant and readable. Anyone who reads this is going to vote for Bill Bradley next year.
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Format: Paperback
This is a very well- written and thoughtful book. Bill Bradley wrote it just as his third Senatorial term was coming to a close. Unfortunately close to that time he had to deal with a number of personal tragedies, including his wife's breast cancer, the severe illness of both of his parents. Bradley tells of his Chrystal City childhood, the only child of his arthritically disabled Presbyterian banker father, and his strongly Methodist mother. He does not revel in his own personal athletic feats and accomplishments. Rather he presents us with a picture of small- town life in that era, and the kind of world he grew up in.

One of the strengths of the book is that it tells much about different regions and populations of America. As a Senator and Presidential candidate he visited eventually every state in the Union and he for instance in his chapter on his Scotch- Irish family background describes the economy and social world of the Appalachians.

Bradley is eager to present to the reader his vision of what America should be. He speaks a lot about responsibility and discipline, and communal obligation. These are virtues he himself personally exemplifies, and one feels how strongly he is repelled by an America gone too soft and self- indulgent, too hedonistically obsessed with short- term pleasures.

He tells of his work in bringing about the Tax Reform Bill of 1986 which eliminated many loopholes, and simplified the system so that it had only two tax brackets. He talks about other public initiatives of his related to helping the poor, the one - parent families. He gives a chapter of the book to considering the difficulties the great American middle- class has faced over recent years.
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Format: Paperback
I hate to use the same word that everyone has been using, but this is indeed an extremely thoughtful book. Bradley takes us through his remarkable rise from small-town athlete to Princeton, Oxford, the NBA, and the U.S. Senate. More importantly, he fuses all that he has learned from his variegated experiences into a compelling philosophy of where we should go as a country and as a people.
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Format: Paperback
I have read a number of political books & memoirs, and I think I can count the times I chuckled on one hand. Until I picked up Mr. Bradley's wonderful, engaging, self-depricating, insightful "Time Present, Time Past."
Now, I am not saying that it is a laugh-a-minute book. Not at all. It just has the tone of reading a particularly well-written letter from a friend. Bradley is candid about his own faults, refreshingly direct about his political views and his mistakes.
The structure of the text is interesting -- it is non-linear, which makes it even more compelling. It takes the reader through a free-association voyage on the 1992 campaign trail, learning tidbits about Bradley and politics all the way.
But the real reason to read this book is not because Bill Bradley is funny (which he is) or because he can craft a good turn of phrase (which he can) or because he is interesting (which he is).
The real reason is that this book is about the essence of what American politics could be, if everyone were even half as excited as Bill Bradley. His absolute integity and leadership shine through every page of the book.
Highly recommended.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
EDIT of 19 August 2009 to downgrade to 4 stars. Bill Bradley, like Al Gore, sold out. He accepted the Wall Street lures and chose not to blow the whistle on the two-party tyranny that has betrayed the public trust and mis-spent the public monies for special interests. He is, though smart and good as a person, part of the problem. Shame on him, shame on all of them.

Bill Bradley and John McCain may go down in history as the two smartest men who should have been President, but could not get elected. This is an extraordinarily thoughtful book, and it makes one almost cry out in despair. America has given up the idea of an informed democracy led by informed representatives of the people, and as the author concludes his book, given over all the power to two kinds of technocrats: political technocrats like Karl Rove who will do anything to get their man elected, including unethical misrepresentations against Republicans like John McCain, never mind Democrats; and corporate technocrats, who will kill off the middle class and increase the working poor in the name of corporate bottom lines that pass off the social and economic costs to the very taxpayers being disenfranchised.

The current Congressional and Executive systems do not work as intended. Congress has become insular and corrupt, and the Executive--at the political level--has become ideological and corrupt. Bill Bradley's writing makes it clear that there are solutions, but men like Bill Bradley will not get elected--nor even heard--until sufficient catastrophe befalls America and the people rise up in desperation to reclaim their heritage.

The index is helpful in looking up specific views of the author, e.g. on health care, national security, etcetera.
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