Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Titan (NASA Trilogy, Book 2) Mass Market Paperback – October 7, 1998

3.2 out of 5 stars 112 customer reviews
Book 2 of 3 in the NASA Trilogy Series

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.96 $0.01

50% off featured Fantasy books
Select Fantasy books are up to 50% off for a limited time. Learn More
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A major new talent!" -- -- Arthur C. Clarke

"Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, and Robert Heinlein succeeded . . . and now Stephen Baxter joins their exclusive ranks, writing science fiction in which the science is right. A sheer pleasure to read!" -- New Scientist

"A major new talent!" -- Arthur C. Clarke

"Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, and Robert Heinlein succeeded . . . and now Stephen Baxter joins their exclusive ranks, writing science fiction in which the science is right. A sheer pleasure to read!" -- New Scientist

About the Author

Stephen Baxter is an acclaimed, multiple-award-winning author whose many books include the Xeelee Sequence series, the Time Odyssey trilogy (written with Arthur C. Clarke), and The Time Ships, a sequel to H. G. Wells's classic The Time Machine. He lives in England.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (October 7, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061057134
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061057137
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (112 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,196,557 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on July 15, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Titan is a frustrating book because it is obvious that Baxter could've spun a believable and moving tale. The science, as far as I can tell, is accurate, and the mission to Titan, cleverly orchestrated. Why is it so frustrating? Because the message is unrelentlessly negative and pessimistic, and there isn't a single likable character in his very very long tale. One wonders what motivates Stephen Baxter, because if this book is any indication, it appears that everything is dismal and worthless to him. In his world, no one has a sense of wonder, humor, or hope. He complains through one character after another, that the current generation no longer cares about science and space exploration. All they truly care about are themselves, and oh yeah, the internet. He's relentlessly negative about that, too. Even the heroes and heroines of the mission to Titan, spend page after page complaining and whining to one another, with no encouraging words, love, or friendship shared among them. They are on a mission to another world for heaven's sake, you'd think they'd be a little ~excited~ about it. Once they finally get to Titan (a ~7 year trip through space), it's described as a hostile and bitterly cold hell of little to no scientific value. They begin to ask themselves why they bothered to go at all. After reading this novel, an unencouraging, dreary, pessimistic, and humorless adventure, you'll ask yourself why you bothered to tag along.
As a side note, take a trip to SETI@home and check out the downloads (>700 000 at last count), or the keen interest in NASAs Pathfinder Project to Mars, and then tell me people don't care about the universe around them.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Possibly, like others interested in science, there were two key disappointing moments in my life that came from knowledge derived from science. One was that it is unlikely to go backwards in time by any known method. The other is that it is unlikely that there's life on Mars or elsewhere in our solar system outside of earth, let alone intelligent life. So that when learning more details about this and reading that the largest moon of Saturn, Titan, has an atmosphere, and well, maybe organic molecules that are the precursor to life, it was as an exciting moment as possible for the possibility of life in our solar system outside of earth. Since then, I had always hoped to write a story about Titan. Well Stephen Baxter has written that book, and as far as I'm concerned no other book strictly about Titan need ever be written. This book is so accurate to what's presently known about Titan, that whenever I read any news about Titan I think back and refer to this book. The thing against this book is that it's written somewhat dryly. However, I've read quite a bit of other sources about Titan, newspaper articles, journals, websites, etc, and if you want to feel what it's like to be on Titan, this is the item to read. Now, this book was written in 1997, but it uncannily predicts some of events that have occurred. Baxter predicts the destruction of one of the space shuttles in a fashion similar to what occurred with Columbia.Read more ›
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Titan portrays an incredibly bleak and depressing view of the future. Except for one scene on Titan, the entire novel is bereft of the hope or wonder possible in SF. Unrelenting gloom-and-doom. Aldous Huxley was more uplifting. The characters are unworthy of compassion, and are without depth or humanity. The Earth politics are overwrought and highly implausible.
The ending feels entirely out of place and incredibly improbable. For such a seemingly well researched, scientifically possible SF novel, the hand waving here incredible. And the sex scene here defies all reason. Baxter should have stopped before the epilogue.
The novel is also uneven in terms of detail. Baxter chooses to highly detail some scenes, then gloss over other portions. I could have lived without the in-depth bodily function reports on Titan, for example, yet the double Venus flybys were never described at all.
The NASA / USAF / military industrial complex portion seems a pathetically transparent plot device. Baxter should leave the conspiracy theories to Oliver Stone.
Why did I finish this book? Because I was on a 6-hour flight from Boston to Seattle and I couldn't toss it out the window.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you're looking for something to ruin your mood (and potentially bore you to death) this is the book you want...

SPOILER WARNING

The plot: Earth and human society is going to hell in a handbasket. To top it off humanity is wiped out by a miscalculated military asteroid strike. In the meantime astronauts on a one way trip to Titan are dying one by one along the way and on Titan.

The characters are the worst cliches/stereotypes.

The only redeeming quality of the book are a few passages of creative aerospace engineering.

The ending is disjointed, tacked on and resolves noting. The book would actually be better without it.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?