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Title of Record

4.3 out of 5 stars 245 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Filter's 1995 debut album Short Bus, was a platinum-selling smash, led by "Hey Man, Nice Shot," a major alternative, rock and metal hit. Title Of Record is Filter's much-anticipated followup. Both brutal and emotional, Filter's hard-rockin' rhythms, thick, swirling grooves and inventive noise, and Rich Patrick's vocal roar, come together on Title Of Record in a more diverse-sounding album than its first but one even more powerful. Certified at 1 million units by the RIAA. (2/01)

Amazon.com

"Hey Man, Nice Shot" may have been a fluke hit, but Filter's Richard Patrick has spent four years working on the follow-up album, mastering enough sonic variety to ensure that Filter stick around the moshpit. Programmer Brian Liesegang is gone, but Patrick continues on, picking up the slack and yielding nothing. Crowd reaction is impossible to anticipate, but at 70 minutes, Title of Record is an exhaustive collection of hyperkinetic guitars, subliminal melodies and thunderous dynamics--which is to say, it sports plenty of hard rock aggression, but is firmly rooted in the pop experience that keeps the songs in your head. "It's Gonna Kill Me" has a stalker's vibe in its techno-metal roots, while "Take a Picture" and "Captain Bligh" are radio-friendly unit shifters that suggest that underneath the technology rests a beating, and often bruised, human heart. --Rob O'Connor
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 24, 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Reprise
  • ASIN: B00000JZC4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (245 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #31,961 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Christian Zimmerman on March 19, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Every genre of popular music has its own set of unwritten rules, from punk's avoidance of the mainstream to pop's emphasis on looks as much as talent. Perhaps the foremost rule of the industrial genre is that "real" industrial fans are to dismiss the crop of bands that emerged in the wake of Nine Inch Nails as derivative, and thus to be dismissed as "industrial lite." However, Filter's second album, TITLE OF RECORD, once again proves that unwritten rules are generally stupid.
With this album, Richard Patrick has loosed most of the chains that tied him to Trent Reznor's work. Rather, any remaining similarities occur simply because both artists are working in the same genre. Make no mistake, this is an industrial album, but instead of using the ragged distortion that made SHORT BUS repetitive, here Patrick is more inclined to create swirling atmospheric effects for what are otherwise straightforward rock songs. Of course, the fact that this album has atmosphere does not change the fact that most of these songs are really freakin' loud, and sound best when played that way (especially "Welcome To The Fold," which is definitely the best track here).
Derivative? Maybe. But when you're this good, who cares?
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By A Customer on December 18, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Back in 1995 when "Hey Man Nice Shot" was relesed I instantly became hooked on their album "Short Bus". Now 4 years later they continue to create some of the best tunes I have ever heard. They have matured into a newer and better sound than their previous recordings. Highlights of this album include Captain Bligh, Take a Picture, I Will Lead You, and I'm Not The Only One. If you are coming into the world of filter as either a new or old fan you will love their stuff as much as I do. Pick yourself up a copy of both albums and see what I mean.
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Format: Audio CD
Filter's second LP, Title of Record is leagues ahead of its predecessor, Short Bus. Robert Patrick even manages to craft an irresistible hook sometimes ("The Best Things"). As stated in the title of this review, Filter frontman Robert Patrick displays some very powerful emotion on this album. There's a lot of cathartic screaming on tracks like "It's Gonna Kill Me," while wearing his heart on his sleeve on "Take a Picture" and "Miss Blue." The latter track dabbles in neo-psychadelia and traces of the Beatles can be heard. One of the album's stand-outs is "I'm Not the Only One," for which Patrick layed the vocals after his then girlfriend dumped him on the phone. He then punched a hole in his wall, causing serious injury to his hand, rewrote the lyrics, and sung them. Real, honest pain shines through here. It begins slow and wistful, and culminates with a thunderous wall of guitars and Patrick's trademark screams. Filter also utilizes a lot of electronica on Title of Record, but they never let it overshadow the song. It makes songs like "It's Gonna Kill Me" even better. The electronics aren't always there, however. There are great guitar-driven songs like "I Will Lead You" and "Welcome to the Fold."

In a time when unimpressive, unoriginal, boredome inducing bands like Creed sit atop rock's throne, it's nice to see a band and an album with such intense and subdued emotion.
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Format: Audio CD
I almost find it hard to belive that Richard Patrick, the head hauncho of Filter, was the original touring guitarist of Nine Inch Nails. While there still are touches of NIN-styled industrial-rock, in truth this band is really very different from Trent Reznor's. First off, Filter is much more subtle in its music, with much more varying elements than Nail's blatent, dark pounding. While this album is still dark, occasionally very much so, Filter chooses not to make it so painfully obvious, and instead uses undertones that the music creates to set the mood. And if you can unfold the music, you realize that the tone of the album tends to be one that is rather depressing; even the softer songs like the acoustic hit single ' Take A Picture ' and the soft closer ' Miss Blue ' have a haunting aura about them. But another difference between this album and a Nine Inch Nails work is the type of darkness that it portrays. While Reznor is content to continuously scream and moan about Hell, violence, God ( or the lack there of ), and self-hatred, Patrick paints pictures of, and occasionally even sings about, lost love, emotional betrayal ( ' Captain Bligh ' talks about a lawsuit filed against Patrick by a fan of the band ), self doubt, and even environmental damage. And to accompany this, Filter uses a wide variety of styles to augment their music that makes their vision that much more varied then Reznor's. While they still have songs that could be called industrial rock similar to Nine Inch Nails ( the most obvious example being ' Welcome to the Fold ' ), they somehow manage to sound different, at times very much so, and the results are stunning.
I want to make this clear: I have absolutely no problem with NIN; in fact, I own some of their albums.
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Format: Audio CD
Naturally, I bought this CD because of the current focus on "Take A Picture." I found, at first, that I might not like this CD, because of songs like "Welcome To The Fold." But I was wrong. Instead I was pleasantly surprised with songs like "Cancer," "Skinny," and my most favorite out of all, "Miss Blue." Even though at first this CD sounded a lot like where Richard Patrick had come from (Nine Inch Nails), it turned out that he is quite an individual with a wonderful message to the world.
Sadly, amazon.com has a limited amount of sound clips (which lack, of course, "Cancer," "Take A Picture," "Skinny," and "Miss Blue.") So it will be hard to buy this CD if you are searching for the "Take A Picture"-esque sound or the Nine Inch Nails-esque sound. But in total sincerity, if you listen to the entire CD, "Miss Blue" sort of sends you away with a sense of change. Filter starts out angry and gradually changes over into a more quiet, yet still rock-y, sound, and ends with something that you probably would never expected. A beautiful CD.
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