Industrial Deals Salon Beauty Best Books of the Year Black Friday Deals Week nav_sap_hiltonhonors_launch For a limited time. 3 months for $0.99. Amazon Music Unlimited. New subscribers only. Terms and conditions apply. STEM Starting at $39.99 Grocery Handmade Gift Shop Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon soul2soul soul2soul soul2soul  Three new members of the Echo family All-New Fire HD 8, starting at $79.99 All-New Kindle Oasis GNO Shop Now HTL17_gno

To Catch A Thief (1955)
Format: DVD|Change
Price:$16.41+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on March 31, 2017
This book is the basis for the story used in the movie To Catch A Thief with Cary Grant and Grace Kelly. The book is not as light and frothy as the movie; it's written in a noir style. I usually enjoy reading books from which familiar movies were made. I like to have an idea of what the writer intended. And the book is quite different. I enjoyed it.
2 helpful votes
3 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on November 13, 2017
Alfred Hitchcock directs this elegant suspense story starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly. On the French Riviera after WWII, Grant is romancing the wealthy Kelly. But someone is stealing jewelry from the rich. Everyone suspects Grant, who was a cat burglar before the war. Suspense mounts. Grant says he is being framed by someone who knows his old techniques and is using them. Can he prove it before he is arrested? It all leads to a fantastically tense finale on a dark rooftop.

Great acting, directing and script. One of Hitchcock's best films of all time, right up there with "Notorious," "North By Northwest," "Rear Window" and "The Man Who Knew Too Much."
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on October 19, 2016
I bought this book on Amazon. It reached me well in time and in very good condition. I had seen its movie, but the book was also quite good. It is a little different from the original story of the movie, but this book also is well written, logically and with uncomplicated English. It has some romance also in it, which added to the spice of the novel. It has suspense and I really like the happy ending for everyone. I recommend it for at least once reading.
2 helpful votes
3 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
VINE VOICEon May 18, 2012
You may not know David Dodge, but you most likely have heard of the Hitchcock film starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly, on which this book is based. The film took some liberties with the book, but the book would stand the test of time without the film. It's the story of John Robie, an infamous and very successful jewel thief who is caught by the French authorities right before WWII breaks out. Escaping during a prison break while the Nazi's hold France, Robie retires and tries to live the straight life on the beautiful Cote d'Azur after the war.

However, a copycat burglar suddenly appears, and to all of France and especially the police, it looks like Le Chat as Robie had been known, is back. Throw into the mix a mother and her beautiful daughter, both with more jewelry than they need, and all the obvious plot elements fall into place. The scenes on the rooftop when Robie is tracking and sparring with the real thief are wonderfully done, as are the descriptions of many locale along the Cote d'Azur.

When I finished the book, I asked myself if I preferred the book or the film. I really like the movie, but I think Dodge's original story line was even better than what Hitchcock changed.

This edition from Bruin Books is a wonderful re-issue with great introductory and concluding comments. Bruin is to be commended for their attention to releasing books by a writer many readers should get to know.

Recommended highly.
3 helpful votes
4 helpful votes
|
22 comments|Report abuse
on August 19, 2015
Before there was Sean Connery or Roger Moore, there was Cary Grant and before there was Ursula Andress or Honor Blackman, there was Grace Kelly. Those two, with the help of many gifted actors and actresses and Hitch, of course, made this film a classic that can even work today if given the chance. The handsomeness of Cary Grant and the beauty of Grace Kelly were both out of this world. I don't think anyone's ever going to match them and who can ever forget catch phrases such as, "The Cat has a new kitten," " Sorry I ever sent her to finishing school. I think they finished her there.," "You want a leg or a breast? You make the choice.," or "You know as well as I do: this necklace is imitation. Well, I'm not." If there is one word to describe this film (to describe a Hitchcock film, even), that word would be...CLASS!
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on February 9, 2014
To Catch a Thief is another wonderful Hitchcock film. In it a very suave and debonaire John Robie, Cary Grant, is the much maligned hero trying to prove his innocence of a recent spat of jewelry thiefts that have all the markings of his past exploits from shortly after World War II. All of his old French underground friends now suspect him as well as the police and the public in general. Grace Kelly plays the beautiful and sophisticated Frances Stevens, a rich daughter of a very down to earth mother who has a large amount of jewelry that would be a prime target for 'the cat', Cary Grant's character. John and Frances of course fall for each other but it is a rocky road down that trail as they have somewhat conflicting interests and fears. Some fine performances by the supporting characters, especially the mother and the insurance investigator, make for a well done and enjoyable movie experience.

I would highly recommend this movie to any old movie or mystery fans!
1 helpful vote
2 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on March 16, 2017
Cary Grant is a stud! He is the sexiest guy around and those who have not enjoyed older movies, look him up. This is a beautiful film. Great story. Amazing scenery. Sexy couple. You will be hooked!
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on January 29, 2017
Great movie with Grace Kelly before she became the Princess of Monaco and was killed like Princess Diana.
1 helpful vote
2 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on November 24, 2010
David Dodge first made his way into my consciousness in July 2010 by the reprint of his first novel, _Death and Taxes_. It was unexpectedly charming, witty, and satisfying--unexpected because I had never even *heard* of David Dodge, and was only introduced to him and alerted to this reprint series by a friend.

_To Catch a Thief_, the next in what I hope will be a long line of David Dodge reprints by Bruin Books, is set in the post-WWII Riviera. John Robie is an expatriate American who has "retired" to the life of a gentleman farmer in the Côte d'Azur. Robie has some secrets, though, that if exposed, could land him back in a French prison; he is on an unofficial and uneasy reprieve for jewel thefts committed before the war, before he joined the French Maquis (anti-occupation guerrilla fighters). He needs to expose, and soon, the copy-cat burglar whose exploits threaten to send him and his compatriots back to prison.

This is the novel upon which the famous Hitchcock film was loosely based. For David Dodge, a California tax accountant turned novelist and travel writer, this was his most financially successful novel. The protagonist John Robie is by turns a fascinating and infuriating character, as are several of the other main characters. Robie eventually understands his own irrational rejection of the trust of good friends by realizing that being a thief is a "state of mind," which stays with him even when he is no longer thieving. Will he overcome that mental and emotional limitation? Will he decide to trust his honest friends? Will he see love staring him in the face before it's too late? These questions, as much as finding out who has been successfully imitating Robie's earlier felonious feats, easily consumed me until the last page (despite my own confident--and utterly erroneous--assurance that I knew the identity of the thief quite early on).

I've written this review through the point of view of the woman I am, focusing on relationships, dialogue, and plot. I confess that the roof-chasing scene was as tedious to me as are car-chasing scenes in movies, but which I mention because there seems to be something for everyone: action, history, relationships, motivations, secretive manipulations, and exhilarating <for some> chases. It doesn't have quite the fresh wit and laugh-out-loud moments of Dodge's _Death and Taxes_, but makes up by immersing the reader in the world of the fabulously rich, as well as the rough but engaging world of the French underworld and WWII freedom fighter.

This edition has a lot going for it. First and foremost, we have to thank Bruin Books for reprinting a title (and an author) that has long been out of print. Randal S. Brandt writes a deliciously enticing and informative introduction. The margins are generous and the font easy-to-read. Suggestions for improvement: print on acid-free paper, and make available in a Kindle edition.

The downside of this edition are the number of typographical errors, most of which appear to result from inattentive editorial review of scanned text subjected to optical character recognition. The large majority consists of random punctuation (e.g., "In the winter, he wore all the clothes; he could put on"), unnecessarily hyphenated words (e.g., "bag-gage"), and a few out-and-out misspellings (e.g.,"desk" instead of "deck").

These errors do not however significantly detract from reading pleasure. If you saw the movie _To Catch a Thief_; if you enjoy novels in exotic places; if you like glamour and sophistication and clever criminals; if you like an absorbing but not overwhelming plot; if you like good dialogue, good character development, and a good ending; then you must read Dodge's To Catch a Thief. You don't have an excuse any more.
10 helpful votes
11 helpful votes
|
11 comment|Report abuse
on April 20, 2011
So much has been said about this classic already that I just want to give a few thoughts on this movie...

To Catch A Thief (1955) is a very classy and lighthearted Alfred Hitchcock romantic thriller. This was Grace Kelly's third and final movie with Hitchcock. The following year she married Prince Rainier III of Monaco and became the Princess of Monaco and it marked the end of her acting career, though she still wanted to act. The story? This is one of those movies where I care less about the story and more about what I see on the screen. In other words, Grace Kelly. Duh! Her presence lures me in. I say who cares about the story! I think of this movie as a movie that was really meant to show off Grace Kelly, the French Riviera, and the immense talent of costume designer Edith Head. There are times when watching this movie that I actually forget that it's about a retired jewel thief who is suspected of stealing again and is out to clear his name because the movie starts off strong, then slows down a lot, then finishes strong. The beginning and end of the movie have the most Hitchcock "feel" of suspense. The slower middle part, in my opinion, is a fancy and often lighthearted show - a romance between John Robie (Cary Grant) and Frances Stevens (Grace Kelly), with fabulous wardrobes, fireworks, and the scenery of the French Riviera. I don't mind this. I think it's refreshingly different. But if you're expecting to see a Hitchcock movie with a lot of suspense and some darkness, see one of his other movies, such as Psycho (1960), Vertigo (1958), Rear Window (1954), Notorious (1946), The Birds (1963), Dial M For Murder (1954), Shadow Of A Doubt (1943), North By Northwest (1959), Rebecca (1940), Strangers On A Train (1951), Frenzy (1972), Saboteur (1942), Spellbound (1945), or Marnie (1964).

One eerie thing about this movie is that the high speed driving scene with Grace Kelly driving and Cary Grant in the passenger seat was filmed not far from the area where Grace Kelly was driving when she had a stroke and crashed her car with daughter Stephanie in the car with her in September 1982. It's kind of spooky to see this. It's a shame what happened to her.

The musical score by Lyn Murray is good. This DVD has a lot of extras, which include Writing and Casting To Catch A Thief, The Making Of To Catch A Thief, Alfred Hitchcock and To Catch A Thief: An Appreciation, and Edith Head - The Paramount Years. It also has the theatrical trailer and audio commentary by Peter Bogdanovich and Laurent Bouzereau.

Overall, I give this movie 4 1/4 stars, rounded down to 4. It's a good movie that I recommend.
3 helpful votes
4 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse

Customers also viewed these items

Charade
$6.88

Need customer service? Click here