BCA Month Salon Beauty Fall Reading Hallo nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc New Album by Chris young $69.99 Handmade Gift Shop hgg17 Save $30 on a Deep Cleaning Appointment curbpremiere curbpremiere curbpremiere  Three new members of the Echo family All-New Fire HD 8, starting at $79.99 All-New Kindle Oasis GNO Shop Now HTL17_gno



on October 24, 2016
I enjoy Slater's food column, and the outline of the story sounded promising. But in the reading I found myself uncomfortable with how much he pulled back the curtain on the private lives of the dead. His father is a villain straight out of central casting, as they say in Hollywood, and Slater paints an affecting picture of a lonely childhood. But he also comes across as kind of a jerk. His depiction of his stepmother strikes me as garden-variety class bigotry and sexism. He needs her to remain a two-dimensional nemesis, so much so that he sometimes is at pains to ignore her humanity, even when a generous interpretation of her actions would be the simplest and most logical reaction. And the sex passages read more as narrative gimmicks than as an organic part of the story. I was eager to try the book, and there are touching moments, but it left me sad.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 19, 2016
I can see where some readers may connect with this book, especially readers from England. I would assume it would create nostalgia from childhood. However, not only could I not connect with any of the writer's experiences-both in food nor family-I also could not ascertain any depth of emotion from the writer. The memories were simply voiced recollections, often expressed rather unfeelingly. I read this for book club, had I read it on my own I would never of had the patience to finish it.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 31, 2012
Nigel Slater is one of the best cook-writers around. His books combines thoughtful comment with superb recipes for food that people really eat."Toast" is a different sort of book and--for me--a difficult book. After the loss of his mother at a young age, Slater had a difficult childhood. He and his stepmother did not get along, and his father died when he was still in school. Slater writes with extraordinary candor about those years. While this book does provide insights into the making of a great food writer, it more powerfully uses foods to evoke memories and make sense of loss and healing.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 30, 2015
First, the things I like about this book--Nigel Slater obviously loves food and writes incredibly vividly about food. I like the concept of this book...it's more or less a collection of small essays about food that tell the story of his childhood through his teenage years. It's very easy to read and is a pretty short book. The downside to the way it's written is that storytelling feels rather fragmented at times. As far as writing style is concerned, there are many times when his writing is blunt to the point of being harsh, which I found off-putting at times. Regardless, if you are a food lover/passionate cook, you will probably appreciate the highly descriptive food memories described in this book.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 26, 2012
This book is particularly fun to read for anyone having spent a childhood in England. Some of the foods mentioned I had not heard of in years, but I clearly remember them. The title of the book is a bit misleading. Nigel Slater came from an affluent family so he never suffered hunger. This book associates food with his extended childhood memories. Sometimes they are sad.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 17, 2015
It was irritating to not understand aoubt what foods he was talking about, but I pushed that to the side. I don't live in England, so don't have the experience with their food. Other than that, it was a good book - sad and depressing, but well written. Wish I knew more about English life so I could understand some of his experiences, but that is always a good research project!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on May 17, 2014
I was not familiar with Nigel Slater but based on Amazon blurbs and reviews I thought I would enjoy Toast. And boy did I enjoy it! Some of the British brands and expressions were new to me but many of them I did know. Enjoyed this book so much that I'm purchasing another book by Mr. Slater. He is a most enjoyable writer.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon March 26, 2014
An enjoyable memoir organized in short chapters centered on the foods that punctuated Slater's early life. This will be especially interesting to those familiar with English food and treats. While the chapters center on the food, Slater serves up moments of his life--good, bad, confounding, formulating, and we see how his upbringing brought him to a career in food.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on October 2, 2016
I liked this book for the personal story as it was associated with food, and the nostalgia of food reminders from my own childhood.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 9, 2007
Food memoirs crowd the shelves these days. This one really takes the cake. It's not so much about food as a in-depth psychological portrait of a child, and ranks with the best of that genre. It's traumatic, chilling, heartwarming, and uses the barebones, elliptical writing style of a young child to create dramatic effect. It's a quick, easy read and very moving. The last bit is not so good, when he covers his adult life and talks more about being a chef (it starts to sound like Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential - which is a tired genre). But the first 3/4 is fantastic as a piece of writing.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse