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Tokyo Ghost Volume 1: Atomic Garden Paperback – March 15, 2016

4.0 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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  • Tokyo Ghost Volume 1: Atomic Garden
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A stellar creative team seamlessly produces a work that's both breakneck and beautiful. In the Tokyo Ghost future, humans are mired in technological addiction, too busy consuming vapid entertainment directly through their optic nerves to notice when a homicidal millennial nostalgia buff named Davey Trauma goes on another murder spree. Enter Constable Led Dent—himself a hard-core addict—and his (life) partner, Debbie Decay, the only tech-free woman in all the Isles of Los Angeles. Remender (Low) and artist Murphy (Chrononauts) take Dent and Decay through a horror ride of dystopian nightmares as Trauma takes his brain-hijacking abilities to Tokyo—a bastion of nature protected by an EMP field—to plunder its resources for the myopic Flak Corporation. Murphy's sketchy yet detailed art and Hollingsworth's furious colors evoke a loopy, frenetic future, and Remender repeatedly doubles down on a chilling story that gets to the heart of addiction and codependency. (Mar.) \n
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Product Details

  • Series: Tokyo Ghost
  • Paperback: 136 pages
  • Publisher: Image Comics (March 15, 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1632156636
  • ISBN-13: 978-1632156631
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.5 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,386 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Tokyo Ghost isn't perfect. There are some obvious cuts that could have been made to the books cast and dialogue which would have easily put this title in the five-star category. A lot of the dialogue is just too much, and truthfully the whole Davey Trauma character is just trash. Luckily, those are my only criticisms for what is otherwise a brilliant, heartfelt book about addiction and technology.

Tokyo Ghost radiates with shades of Transmetropolitan, as it explores the post-entertainment cyber-punk future, fully equipped with the same over-the-top visual gags and gimmicks that helped make Transmet's world so endearing. Our central character is a fantastically realized, co-dependent, straight edge AF wonder woman, wrangling her tech-addled, ape-like boyfriend to a better life. The book does well to separate Teddy from Led, illustrating the different people who rise to the surface when our addictions take hold. What ensues is a painful story too many of us know, told through a Gibson-esque sci-fi lense, with one heck of a cliffhanger.

Visually, this one is stunning in every respect. We already anticipate the best from both Murphy and Hollingsworth, but they really strut their stuff here, blending futurism with feudal Japan in every issue. The two work brilliantly together, and as a whole, the team here has excellent synergy.

I have know idea where this book goes from here, but I'll be around for volume 2.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm not sure this book is particularly good. It feels like a good start to a much longer story. I was shocked to realize how little the plot had moved by the time I got to the end of the book. So much, happens yet the plot moved so little. I'm not going to hold that against the book since I kept reading and didn't think about it until I was finished. It was also 6 dollars on kindle. I got more for 6 dollars than I would normally get from 2 issues of comics which would also cost me 6 dollars, which this hobby ain't cheap. Unfortunately, I got about as much story.

The visuals are a little all over the place. Size seems to vary all over the place like those old Youngblood comics. I know you're not supposed to say bad things about Sean Murphy but calling it like I see it. I also don't mean it as a negative and purely as an observation. It doesn't hurt the narrative because frankly the book is written about as over the top as those old comics were but it's aware of itself. It tries to make a virtue of all the goofiness. I like Wings Hauser movies and could enjoy it.

The coloring is spot on and really distracts from some of the goofiness of certain things in the comic. Matt Hollingsworth is great here and shows a different style to what I've seen from him in the past. People like to pump Jordie Bellaire as the best colorist in comics but Hollingsworth seems a notch above. I just don't see their name as often and maybe that's why they don't get the cred they deserve.

I wouldn't try to warn anyone off this. I think most people will like it more than me. The second trade will probably be where the story really picks up steam too. It's probably worth it for that and especially at less than 7 dollars.
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Format: Paperback
I'll start off by saying I'm a Remender fanboy. I love Black Science, and what little I've read of Low tells me I'll love it too. But Tokyo Ghost might be my new favorite. The story is relatively simple, but that's not a bad thing. The main focus is (and should be) on the two main characters. They have an interesting dynamic and a relationship that you quickly grow invested in.

This book has also kindled an interest in the cyber-punk genre as a whole, which is saying something for the quality of art/ world building, as I haven't really ever found an interest in cyber-punk in the past.

For the price, this is a steal. If you are a fan of sci-fi or just great comics in general, don't hesitate on picking this up.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
On first glance of what is Tokyo Ghost, one can be taken back by the detailed illustration through out which is superb to no end. But in the same view, that is what to me smothers the flow of the story as the visual is so cluttered that it's hard to tell what dialogue goes with what in view of chronological sequence. I would much prefer this masterful visualuzation as an animation if it isn't already. The drawing and color is excellent the flow of writing is a tad too choppy and disorganized.
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Format: Paperback
Tokyo Ghost collects the first five issues the title. It gets a high “fun factor” rating from me. I would give it 4 1/2 stars, bumped up to 5 because nothing about it (including its derivative nature and occasional incoherence) kept me from enjoying it.

Davey Trauma got his mind trapped in the net. He can control pretty much anyone except Debbie Decay (formerly Debbie Jacobs). She’s straight edge. She has no nanopac so she can’t be controlled. She’s also cute, young, sexy, and barely dressed. That seems like enough reason to keep turning the pages.

Davey uses his nerds to go on killing sprees. Led Dent (formerly Teddy Dennis) and Debbie Decay are trying to stop him. Led and Debbie have a contract with Flak. What does that mean? I don’t know, really, I’m still looking at the page where Debbie is trying to have sex with Led, without much success because Led is addicted to his shows. A twisted love story develops as the plot races along, and unlike a lot of love stories, this one isn’t sappy.

So anyway, Flak is pretty much in control of the media, and he’s willing to let Debbie and Led out of their contract if they go to Japan and destroy something that’s generating an EMP. No problem, if Led can quit watching his shows long enough.

The bulk of the story takes place in a post-apocalyptic Japan that combines elements of science fiction with traditional Japanese folklore. It seems like a utopian society, but is it? For some, maybe, but nothing is easy for Led.

There are some nice philosophical threads, reminders of the importance of benevolence and peace, weaving together the scenes of bloody mayhem. Like yin and yang, they work together to make a complete story.
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