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The Tomb (Adversary Cycle/Repairman Jack) Mass Market Paperback – August 15, 1998

4.4 out of 5 stars 206 customer reviews
Book 2 of 6 in the Adversary Cycle Series

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Mass Market Paperback, August 15, 1998
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Editorial Reviews

Review

“A riveting combination of detective story and horror fiction....This thriller is fast-action fun!” ―Publishers Weekly

“F. Paul Wilson weaves spells with words.” ―Dean Koontz

About the Author

F. Paul Wilson is the New York Times bestselling author of horror, adventure, medical thrillers, science fiction, and virtually everything in between. His books include the Repairman Jack novels, including Ground Zero and Fatal Error; the Adversary cycle, including The Keep; and a young adult series featuring the teenage Jack. Wilson has won the Prometheus Award, the Bram Stoker Award, the Inkpot Award from the San Diego ComiCon, and the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Horror Writers of America, among other honors. He lives in Wall, New Jersey.

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Product Details

  • Series: Adversary Cycle/Repairman Jack (Book 2)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (August 15, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812580370
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812580372
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (206 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #832,815 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By James Choma VINE VOICE on June 27, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the first in F. Paul Wilson's books concerning Repairman Jack, a character that has become one of the most interesting literary creations since James Bond.
Repairman Jack is a fixer of situations -- situations wherein someone has gotten a raw deal and wants to set things right. He has no social security number, no credit cards, pays no taxes, and makes every attempt to avoid the spotlight whenever possible.
The Wesphalen family is living under a curse; a death curse placed a century ago in retaliation for the murderous acts committed by a greedy ancestor.
Kusim Bhakti and his sister have come to New York City to carry out the curse and wipe out the rest of the Westphalen line. To assist with this task, Kusim has brought with him the Rakoshi, perversions of the human species brought about eons ago from the Otherness. You'll discover more about the Otherness in the books that follow.
As it turns out, Kusim hires Jack to track down the thief that mugged his mother and return the necklace that was stolen. Kusim tells Jack its return is a matter of lie and death. Jack succeeds and returns the heirloom to Kusim's bedridden mother. Jack is paid the rest of his price and assumes the job is done. Little does he know he'll meet with Kusim (plus some really mean Rakoshi) again on different terms.
Gia Westphalen has broken off her relationship with Jack, yet her daughter Vicky (the last of the Westphalen line) loves him like a father. Jack still loves Gia and can't bear the thought of never seeing Vicky again. As it turns out, Jack becomes intimately involved with the Westphalens again, protecting Vicky from Kusim and his Rakoshi.
This is an excellent read, and the series only gets better.
Read more ›
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the first book I've read by F. Paul Wilson, but it won't be the last! What a talented writer! Repairman Jack is one of the best characters I've read about in quite awhile!
Repairman Jack is so believable and down-to-earth that the supernatural angle of the story took me by surprise. Yes, I had read the back cover, but the story was so enthralling that I was blindsided by the horror part. There I was, racing along, totally drawn into Jack's world when...oh my gosh...he's...she's...that's a ...wow! What a story!
Without giving away any of the surprises, suffice it to say that this was another one of those books that will keep you up all night to finish. Very well done, and I look forward to reading more Repairman Jack stories.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
F. Paul Wilson is a horror writer and "The Tomb" has some supernatural elements to it. But the book reads more like detective fiction. Repairman Jack is one of the more appealing and memorable fictional characters I've come across and his "profession" reminded me of John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee. And like any good hero of detective fiction, Jack's psyche is haunted by dark and troubling events from his past that WIlson covers in detail. This is an exciting book that should be read for the quality of its storytelling alone.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Everybody seems to agree that F. Paul Wilson is a brilliant writer, and this unusual novel is the best example why. Originally written in 1984, "The Tomb" is not the least bit "dated" (except maybe for the charming absense of cellular phones which would've have been a great help for the characters involved). Once you get used to the really unusual mix of down-to-earth detective story and supernatural phenomena, this book is great entertainment. Repairman Jack is a likeable, very human character with a knack for revenge - a bit over the top generally, but very nitty gritty in other aspects. The storyline feels like a sometimes crude, but always exciting mix of the Big Screen's Indiana Jones and TV's Spenser character.
I have just bought all of the Repairman Jack novels in one order and will read the other three instalments in the coming weeks. "The Tomb" was a very promising start to a supposedly unforgettable series.
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By Rhubarb on November 12, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you've never read "The Moonstone" by Wilkie Collins, you will probably rate this book higher than a three, because the plot is wonderful and the characters quite good.

However, I have just recently read "The Moonstone" and the two books are so similar, that I thought at first that I must have read "The Tomb" before. No so; just the striking parallels between the two gave me the sense of deja vu.

I get impatient with descriptions of the characters' internal states and personal motivations, particularly when they are repeated, in varying words, over and over. "The Tomb" had a lot of them.

And I was really irritated when Jack made the mistake of letting his guard down with the monsters, not once, but twice, thus lengthening the story unnecessarily. If Jack is as lethal and intelligent as the author had made him out to be, he would never have done it, especially not twice, making the book about 100 pages longer than it needed to be.

The end was a bit puzzling too, since one of the female characters suddenly becomes more evil than her brother, without much in the way of buildup. I was left thinking, "Huh? Where did that come from?"

Maybe the next Repairman Jack novel will be tighter and less derivative.
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