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Tomorrow is Forever Hardcover – February 1, 1996

4.5 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“A superior kind of tale.” —The New York Times
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Gwen Bristow (1903–1980), the author of seven bestselling historical novels that bring to life momentous events in American history, such as the siege of Charleston during the American Revolution (Celia Garth) and the great California gold rush (Calico Palace), was born in South Carolina, where the Bristow family had settled in the seventeenth century. After graduating from Judson College in Alabama and attending the Columbia School of Journalism, Bristow worked as a reporter for New Orleans’ Times-Picayune from 1925 to 1934. Through her husband, screenwriter Bruce Manning, she developed an interest in longer forms of writing—novels and screenplays.

After Bristow moved to Hollywood, her literary career took off with the publication of Deep Summer, the first novel in a trilogy of Louisiana-set historical novels, which also includes The Handsome Road and This Side of Glory. Bristow continued to write about the American South and explored the settling of the American West in her bestselling novels Jubilee Trail, which was made into a film in 1954, and in her only work of nonfiction, Golden Dreams. Her novel Tomorrow Is Forever also became a film, starring Claudette Colbert, Orson Welles, and Natalie Wood, in 1946.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 218 pages
  • Publisher: Buccaneer Books (February 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0899660274
  • ISBN-13: 978-0899660271
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,129,527 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I first read this book in German in the 1970s. It deals with a woman's pain suffered by the loss of her fiance to WW1 war efforts. She goes on with her life, gets married and starts her family. Years later an odd German man with disabilities enters the family's life. Suspicions mount in the woman's mind... is this the fiancee she lost years ago? She is just not sure. Meanwhile, this stranger becomes a mentor to her children and herself. While war philosophy abounds in this book, I see it primarily as a wonderful love story, one of the greatest I ever read! Gwen Bristow's style is gripping, a great read!
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Format: Hardcover
I read this book years ago when I was around 10 or 12 years old. I won't go into the plot because other reviewers have already done so, but this was a story that takes place between World War I and World War II. A woman's first husband is supposedly killed in the first war, but what got me was he wasn't killed -- he loved her so much he gave her up and had himself reported as killed -- because he did not want her to sacrifice her life waiting on and taking care of a cripple. I thought this was incredibly beautiful. There's also a chapter later in the book where her oldest son is about to go off to World War II and he asked the crippled German what was about and why we had to have war. This made an impression on me that I've never forgotten my entire life -- even though it applies strictly to the war with Hitler, I will always remember the part about when a child is killed (or murdered) the murderer is destroying the future. That child may have been the one to grow up and find a cure for cancer, or heart disease or whatever. Because the child was killed before having a chance to grow up we may never know what we've lost. Another way to put it is, if you kill a child, what if that child you killed was the one to grow up and maybe save the life of your own child. This made me realize how truly terrible prejudice and hatred can be and today I can't pick up a paper and read about something happening to a young child without thinking about this book and wondering what could have been. Believe me it's a truly remarkable book.
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Format: Paperback
I almost threw this book across the room when I first started reading it. A lot of phrases and colloquialisms are very dated and rather offensive for this day and age. By the time you get through the entire book though, you realize Bristow had an intense purpose for the book, probably motivated by the war she was living in. Set during WWI and WWII, Bristow examines the motivations of war and the purpose of seeminly useless death. Through pain comes triumph and love and victory. For people whose lives have not been touched by war, this book can be a good lesson to remind us that lives were given not in vain.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was very disappointing to me. Reading the excerpt from the book the story sounded good and very different. I think that the idea for the concept was a good one; but I thought the story was very poorly written. There were times where one conversation droned on and on until it became meaningless. One instance of a conversation between two highly technical people that droned on and on for about 25% pages. Everyone in the book was very high class; extremely intelligent and loved to discuss their life theories to the point of being painful. I found myself skimming and just picking up and reading the climax of the end of the book - but could not wait for it to be over.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
though the dialogue is somewhat dated, the book is universal in its theme......actually, the scene with the teens discussion of the war could have been written about present day youth....worth the read
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved reading ALL of Gwen Bristow's novels from 'Celia Garth' to the Plantation Trilogy, yet I struggled through this one. I almost gave up after a third of the story, but after re-reading reviews, I thought...okay, keep on reading! I did..and I ended up skimmimg the last hundred or so pages. I understood and liked the plot but I found some of the writing dragged on and on. Definitely my least favorite Bristow book.
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Format: Paperback
The beginning of this novel is some of Bristow's best writing. The story is intriguing and intricately crafted and the characters are carefully developed. Unfortunately, around the halfway mark the writing devolves as she spends more time sharing her philosophies and less time writing a good story. The dialogue becomes clunky and sometimes painful as the characters make startling realizations and decisions in an instant. That being said, I thought it interesting to read Bristow's thoughts as they were shaped by a unique generation that grew up in between two wars. You can see what themes and ideas are important to her, and looking back a lot of these similar ideologies show up in all her writing.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Tomorrow Is Forever is my favorite movie, one of the few where I like the plot changes better in the movie than in the book. I only read the book this spring whereas I first saw the movie when I was a young woman in the 1950s and then saw it again and again. I did not realize it was a book until recently.
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