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Too Late to Call Texas Audible – Unabridged

4.7 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I've read quite a bit of Trent's stuff, and thoroughly enjoyed it. But THIS . . . The depth, the maturity, and the self assurance of total authority. Emotionally both raw and resonant, with a spare barebones laconicism that will have you doing a double take more than once. This story howls along like a freight train blasting past Folsom Prison at midnight, with the convicts wide awake in their bunks and staring at the ceiling as they listen.

This is on a par with Cormac MacCarthy and Joe Lansdale. The comparison isn't intended as flattery, but merely a statement of fact. I suspect that Messrs. MacCarthy and Lansdale would give this novel the nod as well.

Trent Zelazny comes into his own with this novel. This is the book he always knew he had inside him. Now he's been kind enough to share it with the rest of us.

Oh, yeah: in case you haven't taken the hint by now -- BUY THIS BOOK.
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Format: Paperback
What? Likening this upstart's work to Shakespeare and Tarentino? Has the reviewer lost his mind? Those are two separate questions, to which I answer: 1) Yep, and: 2) ...well, yes, but not in relation to Too Late To Call Texas.

I'm not a spoiler-type reviewer, so I won't give many details, but just let me say this: Not since Jack Bauer have so many characters been in so much danger. The body count is high, the feel-good quotient low. But this is what Zelazny seems to know and do best, which is to deny us relief, shun our pleas for leniency. If you're looking for sunshine and roses look elsewhere. On the other hand, if you like tragedy (Shakespeare) and ugly, in-your-face grit (Tarentino), then look no further. Zelazny knows this territory, maybe too well. And he's not afraid to grab the reader by the scruff of the neck and say, "Pay attention, this is what despair feels like; what it looks, and smells and tastes like."

I find all of this immensely refreshing. We are being told and shown the truth. I don't know the man, so I am going out on a limb in saying Zelazny is not slanting for any particular market, he is stilling some very aggressive personal demons. If I ever get to meet him, I'd like to talk with him long over coffee and beg him never to stop writing. At least until the demons have had their say.

I've raved about Trent Zelazny before, and this latest work only proved my previous rants. This boy can write. You should be reading his work.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I don't read a lot of books these days. It's because I work a lot and because I can't find books I like very much so I read nothing at all. However, I've been following Trent Zelazny's short fiction and knew I'd found a writer I could happily read. Finally. He's the real thing, the real deal. TOO LATE TO CALL TEXAS is a terrific book of blood and happenstance, death and betrayal. Carson is a man falling into trouble, mainly because he's curious. He finds a hat alongside a road, then he finds a body, and from there the novel spreads out to include his wife, Brittany, a passel of villains, drugs, money, backlash, running away and facing the inevitable. I wouldn't have missed this book for the world. I'm a very big fan of the late Jim Thompson, a writer who wrote gritty novels about no-good characters and women with hearts made of straw. He wrote about murder, crime, and the aftermath of following whims...or your own curiosity. He was a giant of a writer and Zelazny is my new Jim Thompson. I love his work, I love THIS book, and if you aren't reading him then you simply don't know what you're missing. I can't say enough good things about this writer and this book. I know I'm gushing, but that's what happens when you've read novels for a lifetime and most of them are dry as dirt and dead as nails, then you find works that live, that feel real, that mean something, and that entertain you. This is a real Five-Star treat. Make Trent Zelazny your go-to man for good books. Buy everything he writes. He's better than good, he's got the stuff of greatness.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What Zelazny has created here is a work of Western Noir driven by and imbued with such a level of existential angst and spiritual anarchy that it becomes Noir as surrealism, a new thing which has more in common with the baroque surrealism of late-period Italian spaghetti Westerns such as Leone's luminous "Once Upon a Time in the West" than with staid, ordinary storytelling. TOO LATE TO CALL TEXAS is dark, riveting, and takes no prisoners.

While a pedant could debate the likeability of the protagonist or minor details of plot logic, that would be to miss the point. Zelazny's story world, the diseased underbelly of society, is so dark and its denizens so rotten that Zelazny's deeply flawed protagonists still mostly obey the Chandler rule, that "...down these mean streets a man must go who is not himself mean, who is neither tarnished nor afraid. He is the hero; he is everything." ... "He must be the best man in his world".

TOO LATE TO CALL TEXAS isn't a book for everyone, but it's certainly a book for serious noir lovers and those who can appreciate a tone piece, who aren't afraid to stretch their comfort zone, and who can appreciate startling flashes of be-bop prose and weirdly cinematic technique. It that's you, buy this book. It's something new under the sun.
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