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Showing 1-9 of 9 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 25 reviews
on March 30, 2013
If you are a hard core reader, you sometimes don't have time to break in something new, and turn to a 'proven' story that you know you will like, and will never grow stale if you let it sit for just a bit. That is how I feel about The Tower Of Fear. I have re-read it many times, and enjoy it each time as much as I did the first reading. It has all the elements a good pseudo-historical fantasy novel should have. It has political intrigue, great characters and back story, and fun plot. I was surprised at the one negative comment, but I beleive that he was used to reading from one perspective only, and was confused by having to conform to Cook's switching viewpoints to give a larger view of the story. I thought the various stories was what made the book great as opposed to merely good.

I do enjoy the plot settings, and I noticed that there are differences as to any real historical equivalant. The Herodians are obviously Roman, and I enjoy his characterising them as short and balding, as this is somewhat true of the average Roman- just look at some of the busts! Ceaser was always fretting about his hair line. I remeber a quote somewhere about being conquered by a 'nation of plumbers', and that fits Cook's Herodians well. Business minded, pragmatic, they are beaurocrats with swords. The city does remind me of Carthage and Jerusalem, particularly the underground resistance cells. I also thought of the Greek city-states, but with Nakor in charge, there is little to no Greek influence possible. Jerusalem seems the best take, as it was never an easy occupation. And, as for the Dartar, they seem more Persian, or other Nomadic desert horsemen. They added a dimension to the story that I also enjoyed, particulary some of thier customs and insights into civilization.

If you are wondering to take a chance on it, well, if you like Scorcery, skilled assassins, intrigue, political maneuvering, spies, child snatchers torn to bits by crowds, uneasy alliances and fluctuating crisis, along with a dose of action and plain adventure, this is a good bet. What I really like about Cook's writing is how he manages to make the extraordinary- to us- seem so ordinary to his characters. And rightly so, as this is their everyday life. This is also the strength of the Black Company sieries, I think- making us feel part of something beyond the norm in a familiar fashion.
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on August 7, 2006
This book is somewhat unique in the books I have read by glen cook. While there are military elements present they are secondary to the story and battles do not play a notable role. The political intrigue, a story of 3 factions interested in control of the city, as well as the goals of the Witch and the infighting in 2 of the factions, one of which at least superficially resembles imperial rome. More generally this book appears to be well informed by classical studies in general and in one particular case it is hard not to think of a certain event in the Punic Wars.

Realistic portrayal of characters, believable political goals and machinations, and sympathetic characters from most sides make this a pleasure to read. If you enjoyed The Dragon Never Sleeps or Shadowline, the political violence will seem more muted here but the tapestry he weaves is arguably more complex.
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on March 5, 2014
Heard this was one of Glen Cook's gems after having read Passage at Arms which is one of my favorite books. tower of fear is a real unique fantasy book very unlike anything you've ever read. It all takes place in a city very much like Carthage and has some real complex characters that you don't know whether to root for or against. Plenty of surprises too.
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on June 27, 2014
A book easy to read that in 1989 didn't get the reception HBO's Game of Thrones is nowadays but is much the same thing. Filled with intrigue and so on that grips you from one page to the next
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on October 11, 2016
Great
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on June 2, 2014
You'll like this... Same style, completely new setting and universe. Keeps you wondering who the food and who the bad guys are till the end.
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on May 13, 2013
Brilliant. One of my all time favorite fantasy books. Unique, great characters, clever plot. My highest recommendation. Glen Cook does not disappoint.
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on May 10, 2013
another great novel by Glen Cook; well worth the read! It is a stand alone novel not connected to any series
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on August 27, 2011
I am a huge fan of Glen Cook's Garrett PI stories. I really disliked Tower of Fear because it tried to tell about the adventure from several protagonist viewpoints. It's almost like he's trying to write an episode of the world he portrays as opposed to one person's adventure. It does add a lot of pages to the book if he is being paid by page.
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