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Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it's still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
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Training the Mind: And Cultivating Loving-Kindness Paperback – November 16, 1993

4.8 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Warning: Using this book could be hazardous to your ego! The slogans it contains are designed to awaken the heart and cultivate love and kindness toward others. They are revolutionary in that practicing them fosters abandonment of personal territory in relating to others and in understanding the world as it is.
The fifty-nine provocative slogans presented here-each with a commentary by the Tibetan meditation master Chogyam Trungpa-have been used by Tibetan Buddhists for eight centuries to help meditation students remember and focus on important principles and practices of mind training. They emphasize meeting the ordinary situations of life with intelligence and compassion under all circumstances. Slogans include, "Don't be swayed by external circumstances," "Be grateful to everyone," and "Always maintain only a joyful mind."
This edition contains a new foreword by Pema Chodron. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Chögyam Trungpa (1940–1987) was a meditation master, teacher, and artist who founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books including Shambhala: Sacred Path of the Warrior and Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala; 1st edition (November 16, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0877739544
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877739548
  • Product Dimensions: 4 x 0.7 x 6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,024,979 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Warning: Using this book could be hazardous to your ego! This book deserves any practicing Buddhist's attention. I've been Buddhist for a little over 2 years, and I wouldn't say I'm a very good one, but I feel that in the heart of all of Buddha's Dharma is Bohdichitta, the cultivation of loving-kindness. No book has been more useful to me in this practice; it is basically the mentality necessary to keep us from straying from the path of enlightenment eloquently spoken by The Venerable Chogyam Trungpa. Once one read and contemplates these slogans and their meaning they seem to rest in the back of the mind and as the introduction states they will rise at the time when they are need to stop your habitual mind's process(usually at the first thought). I recommend anyone who truly wants to change they're entire mentality to read this book, and any other book's that are based on loving-kindness or the seven points of mind training slogans.
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Format: Paperback
I was turned off by the idea of "slogans," and did not read this book the first few times I came across it. However, when I began studying Tong Len, (Unconditional Giving and Taking during the In and Out breath), I found several pages of very good commentary on Tong Len in this book. The slogan says something like, "Unconditional Giving rides the Out Breath, Unconditional Taking rides the In Breath." but when you read what all this means, it is truly the essence of buddhism. (I think this slogan originates from the Way Of The Bodhisattva or Guide to the Bodhisattva's Way of Life by Santideva or Shantideva, which is an excellent book in any of the several English translations now available.) Chogyam Trungpa can be flippant and condescending, which he calls "heavy handed," and explains as a form of compassion. This may or may not be accurate. As a reader, take the parts of this book that resonate with your inner compassion, and let the other parts lie.
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Format: Paperback
What do salty sailors, communists, ad execs, and Tibetan Buddhists have in common? The Power of Slogans! From `Have a Coke and a Smile' to "Be all that you can Be", the brain loves a good saying. This book is Trungpa's translation of the 59 slogans used to instruct Tibetan Buddhists, with his commentary on each. Trungpa is unassailable as an instructor: the 11th generation of a line of chosen Tibetan Trungpas, he went to oxford on a scholarship and then moved to the US in the 1970's where he founded what remain as among the foremost Buddhist/meditative institutions in the country. I tend to believe Buddhism gained a little more than it lost en route to japan, so I prefer the zen stuff, but this book has a lot to offer anyone. Some nitpicking: For a guy who dedicated his life to bringing jargonless Buddhism to the west, the book is a little full of `mystical-sounding foreign words' though thankfully the glossary is very fine. And plenty of important Buddha concepts don't shine through (cause and effect, and the big mirror concepts don't get too much play here) so just make sure this isn't the only book you read on the topic. And some of the slogans are simply not too memorable and consequently lose their force; `always be grateful' is dandy, though `the mahayana instruction for ejection of consciousness at death is the five strengths' seems like an important one that alas probably won't be dancing off too many tongues at the critical moment. Still this is a fine book, a great book for beginners or advanced alike, coming from any tradition whatsoever. & the small format fits well, making it a great book for commutes or travels. Enjoy! (& remember: just because I didn't like the book as much as you doesn't mean you should vindictively vote against my review!)
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Format: Paperback
It is always amazing to me that more people don't know the wonderful work that Trungpa did in bringing Buddhism to the West. He was a proponent of loving kindness who skillfully assisted thousands in understanding both the basic precepts of Buddhism, and specific traditions of Tibetan Buddhism as they are now practiced in both East and West.
This small format book is a wealth of information -- more than the mere "slogans" which lead each section. It is a careful revelation of principals and practices one usese to train the mind, emphasizing how one can use compassion and intelligence in dealing with everyday situations. A real gem of a book to read and read again.
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Format: Paperback
The slogans referred to here (and disliked by one reader) are part of the heritage of Lojong, a very old form of Buddhist practice that I believe has is roots in the ancient Bon religion of Tibet, predating even the migration of Buddhism northward.

Trungpa's interpretation of Lojong, and its key practice of Tonglen meditation, is one of the most usable ones I've ever come across. This book stays by my night stand, and I start and end each day by rereading a single slogan for the day. Following this practice is remarkably easy, yet amazingly subtle. Some of the slogans remind you of the very simple "do unto others" kind of rules for living, while others reveal paradoxes that lead you to hours of reflection.

Having read virtually everything Trungpa wrote, I can tell you that he's the real deal, a genuine mystic who should be tackled only if you're pretty serious about spiritual pursuit. He is outrageous in the best of ways, and sits on my shelves alongside Thomas Merton, Meister Eckhart, and Carl Jung.

Those interested in Lojong can check out lojongmindtraining.com, where you can even request a daily smart-phone transmission of Lojong slogans with your favorite interpreter. It's very interesting to read the various spins different commentators make on these ancient slogans. Many of these commentators are some very heavyweight names in modern Buddhist teaching.
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