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Transformers: Exodus: The Official History of the War for Cybertron (Transformers (Del Rey)) Hardcover – June 22, 2010

3.9 out of 5 stars 76 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Transformers: Exodus is precisely the origin story that the franchise needed. It’s entertaining, filled with the sort of epic battles Transformers lend themselves to, and keeps readers breathless with anticipation even though we already know how it ends. Megatronus was a gladiator until he got his name and started thinking about the way Cybertron’s caste system diminished the bots’ potential. Orion Pax was a data worker—a librarian, really—under the master archivist. The archivist is more than he seems, and provides a great deal of context for the history of Cybertron, and a few key deus ex machina twists. Orion Pax, now known as Optimus Prime, is an honest character, who never asks for the greatness that is forced upon him; Megatron, on the other hand, is an egomaniacal tyrant. But in the framework of a political revolution and the civil war that overthrows a system that had practically calcified, there are terrible fights, friendships made and broken, and the beginnings of a genuine epic; above all, it’s fun to read. --Regina Schroeder

Review

Transformers: Exodus is precisely the origin story that the franchise needed. It’s entertaining, filled with
the sort of epic battles Transformers lend themselves to, and keeps the reader breathless with anticipation
even though we already know how it ends.  [I]n the framework of a political revolution and
the civil war that overthrows a system that had practically calcified, there are terrible fights, friendships
made and broken, and the beginnings of a genuine epic; above all, it’s fun to read.  —Booklist
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Product Details

  • Series: Transformers (Del Rey)
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey; First Edition edition (June 22, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 034551985X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345519856
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,376,181 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Steven Croy on July 6, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I was excited when I first picked this book up over the weekend. I love origin stories, and was interested how this one would tie in with the various continuities.

What I ended up reading was only a few steps away from being a jumbled mess.

Here are my main complaints:
1.) There is no sense of when events occur in relation to each other, other than that events in later chapters occur after those that occur in earlier chapters (for the most part). It was annoying trying to figure out if eons had passed or just days (or if events are occurring at the same time).
2.) The number of references to different continuities can get annoying. "Project Generation One"? Really? It felt like all the continuities got mixed up in a stew, but not everything mixed together properly.
3.) Did X transformer really just get thrown in for a random 1 paragraph mention? Why? How does this advance the plot? Does it reveal any new character motivations? Or is it just fanboy service?
4.) Alpha Trion's role as Yoda seemed ill-conceived. If he really was one of the 13 primes, shouldn't he have known all about Omega Supreme and how to activate him? Why didn't he reveal all about the Matrix, Vector Sigma, et al to Optimus in order to assist in the war? He seems eternally shackled to a caste that he was forced into by Sentinel Prime (who was the best character by far... actual character development!!! Shocker!).
5.) There's little indication after the early part of the book which character is being focused on. The points of view seem to jump around quite a bit, to the point where you're like "Megatron sounds like a good guy!" "Oh, wait, maybe that's Optimus...
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
First off, I've read all of the reviews on this book and do agree that there are a few errors and mishaps, but besides those, this book is on par with the Transformers comics I've read. It's a pleasant mixture of Megatron Origin with Orion Pax as a co-star. Now, this novel tells the origins of the War for Cybertron games and very loosely to the new Transformers Prime TV series on The Hub.

It doesn't really tie into the origins of Transformers G1-G2, Beast Wars and Beast Machines, Robots in Disguise, the Unicron Trilogy, and Transformers Animated. It does mention some characters from those shows, but it's still a different continuity all together. It does touch upon the AllSpark being shot into deep space like in Bayformers.

I didn't find Transformers Exodus to be a huge rough draft as someone claimed, but the minor errors don't hurt the plot that much.

If you want a gripping, exciting origin story on Optimus and Megatron this book is for you.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a huge Transformer fan growing up as a child I couldn't wait to read what Hasbro was promoting as "The New Transformer Bible" Unfortunately what I got was a sloppy, boring, inconsistent pile of crap! By shoehorning a few classic names into the story as it went along, it felt like the author did no research on these characters what so ever... Not even Optimus Prime received any type of visual description....A retooled Orion Pax nood which was Optimus Primes origin in the original animated series would've fit nicely but instead they just take a "clerk" and decide to make him leader. And if the poor character development and contradicting continuity wasn't frustrating enough, the author spends huge amount of time building up the use of "dark energon" by the Decepticons which basically goes no where at the end of the novel.

You would think that with a history as rich as Transformers an origin story could write itself. But between this novel and that live actions franchise, they've proven that the Transformers lore should not be placed in the hands of amateurs.

Or this novels case, at least give it to someone who actually knew who the Transformers were...
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had been putting off reading this book for years because of comments of others, but was talked into to reading it for some of the background covered in it not covered elsewhere.

Which was the only redeeming quality.

It feels like Irvine did no research into Transformer canon, only plucked a few words from a review from the Michael Bay movies (and possibly watched a few episodes of the Energon and Armada series), and sprinkled them liberally yet vastly incorrectly. The constant misuse of the term protoform made me want to yell at my tablet. Coupled with the fact that he had little grasp on characters like Soundwave, Jazz, the Cassetticons, his grasp on Starscream and Shockwave seemed tenuous. It did not even feel like he was doing his TAKE on the characters, it felt like he had no clue and no desire to research.

Optimus and Megatron were very one dimensional. Supporting charters under used, mishandled, and lifeless...

The plot was worthwhile, or at least the attempt at the plot. It got so buried under unnecessary exposition, bad character development, horrible editing, plot holes (gaping like a gorge), confusing narrative, lack of description in both the world and any fight scenes, and such muddied writing it got confusing to what was happening or who was speaking.

Everything felt rushed.

I didn't feel pulled into a world of Transformers. I didn't feel anything for the characters. I was so distracted by the misuse of terminology and the bad punctuation that I had to force myself through the book. And the attempts to bring humor in by using very human references (Six Lasers Over Cybertron? Really) just was trite. I want alien robots, not human amusement parks.

As a world building effort, this was an injustice.
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