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Twelve to the Moon

4.1 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

A group of twelve international scientists are the first to land on the moon. In their exploration of the surface, they run into all kinds of trouble, including threatening messages from alien life forms residing on the moon. Just a short nine years before the historic moon landing, this film's understanding of the science of space exploration is fantastically simplistic, but this well-made science fiction film holds interest with a strong cast and intriguingly strange events, photographed with great style by John Alton. Ken Clark, Michi Kobi, Tom Conway, John Wengraf, and Robert Montgomery Jr. portray the intrepid scientists. Newly remastered.

When sold by Amazon.com, this product will be manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

This product is expected to play back in DVD Video "play only" devices, and may not play in other DVD devices, including recorders and PC drives.


Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Ken Clark, Tom Conway, Michi Kobi, John Wengraf, Anna-Lisa
  • Directors: David Bradley
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: SPHE
  • DVD Release Date: March 4, 2011
  • Run Time: 112 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004CZZZTA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #103,614 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Twelve to the Moon" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Dennis A. Pope on January 2, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This review will center more on the quality of the video then of the film.

But, I would like to say that although obviously a "B" movie, I feel it's it has more to offer then many give it credit for. I thought it had some interesting moments. I did feel some of the dialog was a bit over the top but, overall, to me, it was an entertaining film, with some chilling moments (pun intended?)

Now looking at the cover art, you might feel this looks like a bootleg, however, don't let that scare you, this has a pristine sharp image. The film grain is pretty much intact, but this doesn't distract from an excellent overall look. If you've ever seen some of the copies floating around on different sites in the past, you'll truly appreciate how it this version looks.

The audio (mono) is equally crisp. Background sounds such as NASA background was very clean. I was surprised by this as I've never heard the movie this way before.

The only extra is the trailer which is likewise crisp and is interesting to watch.

The only downside is that because of the nice transfer, the stock footage is very VERY evident, but to fans of this period of science fiction, this will no doubt be quite acceptable.

If you are a fan of this film and have any fear of how it will look, have no fear. Go for it!

The title I gave my review is from a line in the trailer.

I give this 4 stars mainly due to a lack of any extras and it being a DVD+R. A trend that seems a bit unfortunate, however, the silver lining is that this format may result in more of the obscure titles being released since there is no need to stock up on copies without knowing it if they'll sell.

If you aren't much into extras, this is about as good as it gets.
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Format: DVD
Warning: spoiler! This film was made after Russia's two dogs in space flights, which are referenced in the script by the one Russian crew member, but before any manned flights in 1961. It has the international idealism of the period, though some of the crew members have enough emotional baggage you wonder how they made the team to begin with. The moon inhabitants are never seen. After capturing two crew members for study, and demanding two lab animals to be left behind as well, they warn off the crew thinking that the daily bombardment of the moon by meteorites has been inflicted by the earth instead of being a natural phenomena. When the crew re-enters earth orbit, the moon puts the North American continent into a deep freeze. After two crew members make the ultimate sacrifice to return the climate to normal, the moon people decide that we can be friends in the future after all.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I really enjoy discovering "new" old science fiction movies that I've never seen before. One such movie is "12 to the Moon."

Consider the state of spaceflight when "12 to the Moon" came out in 1959. The Space Age, kicked off by the Soviet Union's launch of the first man-made satellite Sputnik 1 on October 4, 1957, had barely been born. A mere handful of primitive satellites were in orbit, and no human had flown in space. We knew very little about conditions on the moon. Scientists hotly debated whether its craters were meteorite impacts or volcanoes. As a historical snapshot rather than a "how-to" spaceflight movie, "12 to the Moon" reflects fairly well the technical and scientific knowledge of its day. It seems incredibly cheesy and naïve today, but it's not bad when viewed as a record of the time it was made.

On the pro side of the ledger, most of the scenes on the moon are excellent. The sets are stark and hostile, with dramatic, low-angle lighting that looks a lot like sunlight in vacuum. The crisp, sharp video transfer adds to the grittiness. Yes, the "mountains" and "craters" are rougher and more jagged than we now know them to be, but virtually every other "moon movie" at the time made the same mistake. The ship "Lunar Eagle 1" is not a bad design, with details that make it look like a real object, not just a movie prop. The spacesuits are U.S. Air Force S-1-style partial-pressure suits that would have been useless on the moon, but they add a touch of techno-realism to the proceedings, even with their "invisible ray-screen" faceplates instead of glass. The interior sets are reasonably well-equipped with gauges, gadgets and gimmicks, including lawn chairs that served as acceleration couches (hey, it was a low-budget movie, okay?).
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Despite being a huge fan of 50's and 60's sci-fi movies, I somehow missed this one until it showed up on Turner Classic Movies a few years back. Now, Columbia offers up a very nice print of this rare movie, and, for the most part, that's great news for us classic sci-fi fans.

Serious science-fiction films during the heyday of drive-in "b" films were pretty rare. The decade got off to a great start with films like Destination Moon and The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951). But the greater part of the 1950's gave us giant critters, alien invaders, and interstellar voyages that were far heavy on FICTION than SCIENCE. So it's refreshing to find 12 TO THE MOON at the end of that decade, offering another thoughtful--in its own limited way--exploration of cosmic themes [Spoilers Ahead].

A truly international crew sets off to explore the moon, and find nothing but trouble when they get there. But I give the writers credit for the crew idea, coming near the end of the Cold War. Sure, everyone speaks fluent English, and there's never any doubt that the American Guy is in charge. And while the 2 female crew members offer solid contributions to the team, an early scene of them showering (very chaste, don't get excited) seems a bit out-of-place. Predictably, some prejudices surface, most notably between a German scientist and a crew member of apparent Jewish origin.

You want aliens? Well, you'll get them. . .sort of. The never-seen "moon people" communicate with the crew through a series of Chinese writings.
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