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Comment: 100% guaranteed delivery with Fulfillment By Amazon. Pages of this book are clean. This book shows minor shelf wear associated with limited use. This is a discarded Library book with normal library stamping and stickers. Purchase of this item will benefit the Friends of the Houston Public Library.
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Twilight Comes Twice Hardcover – October 20, 1997

4.9 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2. In spare, poetic prose, Fletcher describes the twilight of mornings and evenings, those two brief times of day that often seem to have magical qualities. He personifies dawn and dusk and uses images and metaphors to evoke their special qualities and events. The full- and double-paged oil paintings depict a suburban community. A young girl and her dog wander through the scenes, adding interest even though they are never mentioned in the text. Various shades of green, orange, and brown are used effectively to show how the colors of things are transformed by twilight. The personification of dawn and dusk seems strained, and the metaphors are sometimes more distracting than illuminating, e.g., dusk "pours/the syrup of darkness/into the forest" and "hisses on the sprinklers." The pictures speak more clearly than the words. Charlotte Zolotow's When the Wind Stops (HarperCollins, 1995) and Jonathan London's I See the Moon and the Moon Sees Me (Viking, 1996) successfully use art and text to convey a sense of the wonder of the natural world.?Virginia Golodetz, St. Michael's College, Winooski, VT
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

A quietly alluring mood piece that focuses on the twilight times when ``night and day stand whispering secrets before they go their separate ways'' at dawn and dusk. Fletcher (Ordinary Things, p. 460, etc.) finds impressionistic images--``Dusk pours the syrup of darkness into the forest'' and ``dawn erases the stars from the blackboard of night''--that Kiesler makes concrete, by including in her lush, light-drenched paintings a girl and a dog who witness the topical observations of the text. The exploration of how these transitory periods affect the lives of people--from children playing in the park to fishermen casting out in the fading light, from commuters to the girl's family, setting the breakfast table--is achieved through an inclusive sensory range, from dusk's fireflies that swim through air to write ``bright messages in secret code,'' to dawn's smell of doughnuts outside the bakery. Words and art coalesce into an invitation to readers to move beyond the page and into their own explorations of twilight. (Picture book. 4-8) -- Copyright ©1997, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 780 (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Clarion Books; Library Binding edition (October 20, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395848261
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395848265
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 11 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,543 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on July 21, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book was introduced to me in a Teaching Language Arts class in college and I have since fallen in love with it. Ralph Fletcher's vivid descriptions bring his words to life and puts the reader right within his story. Through his use of words, readers can easily paint the picture of twighlight and experience it first hand. This book is excellent for teaching children about descriptive writing and the use of vivid images within their writing. A must have book that is enjoyable for all ages!
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Format: Hardcover
A story set in a suburban neighborhood with a girl and her dog doing various activities as the sun rises or sets. The first part of the book is about dusk and the second part is about dawn. The text is poetic and beautiful. The text is on one page and the illustrations are on the other page; this is a larger sized hardcover book. The illustrations are beautiful paintings, all with the special hues of dusk or dawn. Some of the scenes are: the girl and dog playing in a sprinkler while bats fly overhead and fireflies fly at their feet, two fisherman on the shore of a lake, and the girl and dog taking a walk through the woods at dawn. The poetic nature of the text is rarely found in modern children's books and is a joy to read. "When the sky is full and singing with stars you know that twilight has given way to true night." This is a gentle and calming book to read.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a middle school teacher and found this book to be a great tool for teaching my sixth graders. We have been studying personification and this book has great examples in it. The pictures are beautiful and the text is serene. This is a very wonderful book.
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A Kid's Review on October 22, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I recommend this book for 5-10 year oids because I think people who like poetry should read this book. I liked ho a girl made dawn and night sound beautiful I thik this book is great and you might like it to.
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Format: Hardcover
The author and artist have explored my two favorite times of day with this work. The two twilight periods, dawn and dusk. The text is done in a flowing, simple poetic type prose and those who love poetry will love this one. As to the text, I do disagree with the brief paragraph here published by The School Library journal (who, more often than not, get it wrong anyway) in that they state that the metaphors used are sometimes more distracting than illuminating. This I fear is the mind set that seems to be in vogue of late, i.e. underestimating the intelligence of our kids. If a child is to grow into a truly literate adult, they need to undersand metaphors, their meaning the their use. You cannot, in my opinion, start this process soon enough. What better way to begin than with a work like this. Yes, I will admit that this may take some actual work on some adults part, the explanation, but is not what adults are suppose to do? Even a bad metaphor is better than no metaphor at all when teaching. Anyway....

The art work in this book is stunning. The story, and there is a story here, deals with people, the environment and the critters around us. The entire book is a feast for the eye and ear. The story deals with the two areas mentioned above...what happens during these wonderful times of the day? Why are they so enchanting? Why have poets written about them for hundreds of years? It is enjoyable, the kids like it, which, when all is said and done, is the best endorsement, and it never get old. This is certainly one you need to add to your child's library. Highly recommend this one.
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Format: Hardcover
Sunsets and sunrises have always been special to me especially when they involve bodies of water. In college, I was fortunate enough to live in a dorm next to the Elizabeth River where I was able to enjoy daily sunsets. The beauty of the sun reflecting on the water is very peaceful to me. Every night it seemed as though the sun was gliding into the river for a swim. Twilight Comes Twice is a beautiful book both illustratively and written about darkness and dawn. It approaches twilight from a poetic perspective using sensory language, imagery, and personification to illustrate in words what takes place when the sun rises and sets. The serene and muted illustrations in shades of orange and yellow capture the ambience of the sun’s movement. The author, Ralph Fletcher, uses images and language that children can relate to.
Fletcher begins with the sentence “Twice each day a crack opens between night and day” which allows the reader to view sunset and sunrise differently. He then proceeds to personify night and day by having them “stand whispering secrets before they go their separate ways.” Since night and day have to have time to talk, daylight is not instantaneous which would help children understand the sun rising slowly. His descriptive writing includes alliteration which is a primary reading skill that draws children into the story. Such phrases as “Dusk deepens,” “millions of mosquitoes,” and “dawn drinks up…darkness” stick with children and are easily repeated. Children can make connections to his imagery, too. For example, “Slowly dusk pours the syrup of darkness into the forest.” Most children are familiar with syrup, so they can​ conjure up the image of syrup being poured over trees and sky.
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