Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Former Library book. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Twisted Thing Hardcover – April, 1994

4.7 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all 22 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
$0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: MacMillan Publishing Company. (April 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816155569
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816155569
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,333,557 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
67%
4 star
33%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 9 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
"The Body Lovers" is the tenth book in Spillane's long-running Mike Hammer series. It is solid, vintage Spillane and filled with all the action that readers expect from Spillane's writing. Anyone who likes Spillane would be happy adding this volume to their collection.

The story starts with strong and continues strong all the way throughout. At the beginning, Hammer is just driving along, minding his own business, when he "heard the screams through the thin mist of the night and kicked the car to a stop at the curb." He finds a hysterical child sitting in a pile of rubble and then sees what the kid was screaming about: "the mutilated body of what had been a redheaded woman. At one time she had been beautiful, but death had erased all that." "She had been in her later twenties, but now time had ended for her. She lay there on her back, naked except for the remnants of a brilliant green negligee that was still belted around her waist. Her breasts were poised in some weird, rigid defiance, her long tapered legs coiled serpentine-like in the throes of death." "Half-opened eyes had looked into some nameless terror before sight left them and her mouth was still frozen in a silent scream of pain." There are few writers alive or dead who can open a book with such a description. Spillane does and he does it well. Within pages, the reader is deep in the action, wanting to know what happened to the lady and how Hammer is going to deal with it. Of course finding bodies is nothing new for Hammer.

This is a good, solid detective story with Hammer working to ferret out the clues as to what happened to the redhead in the green negligee as more bodies start popping up. The usual Hammer associates are found in this book.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Twisted Thing (1966) was Mickey Spillane’s first Mike Hammer novel in two years as he had been busy with his Tiger Mann series in the interim. In this book, which apparently was written much earlier, Hammer is mostly disconnected from the incidents that had occurred in the two previous published installments (The Girl Hunters and The Snake) following the character’s reintroduction in 1962 after a decade-long hiatus.

Old NYPD crony Pat Chambers makes only a brief appearance (there is another compliant cop to serve as Hammer’s legal shield and deus ex machina) and supposed fiancee Velda none at all. Hammer’s conflict with Chambers over Velda, a huge component of The Girl Hunters and still festering somewhat in The Snake, is only hinted at in one line here. On the other hand, Hammer does refer (without elaboration) to the startling conclusion of Spillane’s first Hammer novel, I the Jury, which cemented both Hammer’s reputation as a borderline psychopath and Spillane’s as a writer willing to do anything to make a splash.

Otherwise, The Twisted Thing is pretty much a Hammer standalone novel, which is fine. It is vintage Spillane with its tough guy talk (like all Hammer—and Mann—books, it is narrated in first person), convoluted mystery, convenient clues, plot-advancing coincidences and stupendously preposterous conclusion. The story starts with Hammer’s investigation of the kidnapping of a rich scientist’s 14-year-old son, which soon leads to a number of murders (including one with a meat cleaver), all of which takes place in the small Upstate New York town of Sidon. Along the way Hammer deals with crooked (and murderous) local cops, a lusty dame or two and even some lesbians. Of course he gets knocked around a time or two but always comes up swinging.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
The Body Lovers (1967) is a very good later period Mike Hammer book from Mickey Spillane. It follows Hammer’s investigation into the possible connections between the deaths of several young women. My biggest quibble with it is that the ending is way too abrupt and pat. I was hoping for little more imagination there, especially as it was set up so nicely with the runup narrative.

The Hammer of The Body Lovers (and the previous one, The Twisted Thing) is more a traditional crime investigator than the angel of vengeance he is in many of the early books, and I like him much better in this guise. The plot is also more interesting in this kind of book with the innate interest factor of the murder mystery driving the narrative. In the vengeance driven books, Hammer comes off as more of a lunatic loose cannon and the plots tend to be repetitive. Plus, Spillane's apparent inability to flesh out his character from his original one-dimensionality isn't as much of a problem when the story is plot—rather than character—driven.

Unfortunately, Spillane was near the end of his Hammer books at this point, with only Survival…Zero yet to come until he revived the character one more time in the late 1990s for a couple of final installments (several others were finished from Spillane’s manuscripts and published after his death).

If you like hard boiled crime novels of the old school, The Body Lovers would be a good choice.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Chronologically, “The Twisted Thing” simply doesn’t follow the logical course of Hammer’s development or his relationship with Velda that has grown in “The Snake.” It is an earlier novel, having been written as perhaps the second book in the series. As such, “The Twisted Thing” is more of an old-fashioned detective novel with Hammer being hired by a wealthy individual out on a small Long Island town to solve his son’s kidnapping. The book is filled with corrupt small town cops, gambling, ex-strippers, steamy photographs, blackmail, shootings, car chases, and the whole extended family gathered for a whodoneit type of accusation after a murder. Hammer is there in the middle of all of it, attempting to bring some order to this steaming helping of messy stuff. The book is filled with typical Spillane action and intrigue.

The book opens in typical Spillane fancy talk: “The little guy’s face was a bloody mess. Between the puffballs of blue-black flesh that used to be eyelids, the dull gleam of shock-deadened pupils watched Dilwick uncomprehendingly. His lips were swollen things of lacerated skin, with slow trickles of blood making crooked paths from the corners of his mouth through the stubble of a beard to his chin, dripping onto a stained shirt.” Wow. What amazingly descriptive prose. There are few writers even today who could take the time and effort to so carefully describe a beating in the back of a police station.

The characters in this book include a boy genius, a crooked smalltown cop, a man-woman, an ex-stripper hired to watch over the boy genius, and the rich man’s family which included Alice Nichols, the nymphomaniac, who had “deep brown eyes that kissed mine so hard I nearly lost my balance. She swept them up and down the full length of me.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse