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The nights are cloudy, the alleys are dark, the men are dangerous, bars are smoky and femmes are fatale. "Sin City" is a thing of dark, bloody beauty.

It certainly says something if a graphic novel author helps out with a movie... especially if that creator swore he'd never let it be adapted. That is only one of the things that makes "Sin City," the adaptation of Frank Miller's comic, such a fascinating film.

"Sin City" is actually made up of three stories: In the depths of Basin (Sin) City, scarred hulk Marv (Mickey Rourke) sleeps with a beautiful prostitute, Goldie (Jaime King), only to find her dead beside him the next morning. Enraged, he goes on a killing spree to find her murderer, and learns that sinister cannibal Kevin (Elijah Wood) is responsible. But there's a powerful figure behind Kevin, who calls the shots.

Elsewhere in Sin City, Dwight (Clive Owen) does his best to defend Gail (Rosario Dawson) and the other Old Town prostitutes. But when Dwight kills a crooked cop, he has to somehow cover up the crime. And Hartigan (Bruce Willis), a cop with a failing heart, goes out of his job with a bang: He rescues little Nancy Callahan from a child molester who happens to be a senator's son. Hartigan is jailed, and when he gets out, he finds that Nancy (Jessica Alba) has grown into a lasso-twirling stripper. But the senator's son -- nicknamed Yellow Bastard -- is still after her.

"Sin City" is one of those few comic book adaptations that doesn't seem... well, cartoonish. Sure, it's the very image of noir, but the grim tone and grey characters are very real. It's not a movie for the fainthearted, but whoever enjoys the films of Quentin Tarantino (who directed one scene here) will surely be blown away.

Like "Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow," this film is done almost entirely digitally. But unlike "Sky Captain," it has substance as well as style. All the sets and props are done with computers, and nearly everything is in black and white. Here and there we get a splash of colour -- red lipstick and matching dress, Yellow Bastard's face, green eyes.

The contents of three "Sin City" comic books are interwoven here, and Rodriguez is constantly faithful: A lot of these shots could have been lifted straight from the comic's pages. He also preserves the stark, black-and-white style that the graphic novels are known for. You can't get much more faithful than that.

"Sin City" is not quite a "Kill Bill" bloodfest, though -- surprisingly, this brutal movie has a dark sense of chivalry. Each story is about an outcast man defending a woman's honor, safety, or memory, even if he sacrifices himself in the process. "Sin City" wears its heart on its sleeve, even if that sleeve is bloodstained and torn.

Most of the actors do wonderful jobs -- Owen's dark photographer, Rourke's scarred strongman, Stahl's revolting Yellow Bastard, and Alba's surprisingly sweet stripper. Only a few, like Brittany Murphy, have lackluster performances. But perhaps the most memorable performances come from Bruce Willis and Elijah Wood. Willis plays his aging cop role with unusual grace, even when shooting the genitals off Yellow Bastard. And Wood plays Kevin with both creepy evil and spiritual ecstacy... all without saying a word.

"Sin City" is a remarkable, bleak, intense movie -- a halfway point between Tarantino and Raymond Chandler. An outstanding piece of work.
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The nights are cloudy, the alleys are dark, the men are dangerous, bars are smoky and femmes are fatale. "Sin City" is a thing of dark, bloody beauty.

It certainly says something if a graphic novel author helps out with a movie... especially if that creator swore he'd never let it be adapted. That is only one of the things that makes "Sin City," the adaptation of Frank Miller's comic, such a fascinating film.

"Sin City" is actually made up of three stories: In the depths of Basin (Sin) City, scarred hulk Marv (Mickey Rourke) sleeps with a beautiful prostitute, Goldie (Jaime King), only to find her dead beside him the next morning. Enraged, he goes on a killing spree to find her murderer, and learns that sinister cannibal Kevin (Elijah Wood) is responsible. But there's a powerful figure behind Kevin, who calls the shots.

Elsewhere in Sin City, Dwight (Clive Owen) does his best to defend Gail (Rosario Dawson) and the other Old Town prostitutes. But when Dwight kills a crooked cop, he has to somehow cover up the crime. And Hartigan (Bruce Willis), a cop with a failing heart, goes out of his job with a bang: He rescues little Nancy Callahan from a child molester who happens to be a senator's son. Hartigan is jailed, and when he gets out, he finds that Nancy (Jessica Alba) has grown into a lasso-twirling stripper. But the senator's son -- nicknamed Yellow Bastard -- is still after her.

"Sin City" is one of those few comic book adaptations that doesn't seem... well, cartoonish. Sure, it's the very image of noir, but the grim tone and grey characters are very real. It's not a movie for the fainthearted, but whoever enjoys the films of Quentin Tarantino (who directed one scene here) will surely be blown away.

Like "Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow," this film is done almost entirely digitally. But unlike "Sky Captain," it has substance as well as style. All the sets and props are done with computers, and nearly everything is in black and white. Here and there we get a splash of colour -- red lipstick and matching dress, Yellow Bastard's face, green eyes.

The contents of three "Sin City" comic books are interwoven here, and Rodriguez is constantly faithful: A lot of these shots could have been lifted straight from the comic's pages. He also preserves the stark, black-and-white style that the graphic novels are known for. You can't get much more faithful than that.

"Sin City" is not quite a "Kill Bill" bloodfest, though -- surprisingly, this brutal movie has a dark sense of chivalry. Each story is about an outcast man defending a woman's honor, safety, or memory, even if he sacrifices himself in the process. "Sin City" wears its heart on its sleeve, even if that sleeve is bloodstained and torn.

Most of the actors do wonderful jobs -- Owen's dark photographer, Rourke's scarred strongman, Stahl's revolting Yellow Bastard, and Alba's surprisingly sweet stripper. Only a few, like Brittany Murphy, have lackluster performances. But perhaps the most memorable performances come from Bruce Willis and Elijah Wood. Willis plays his aging cop role with unusual grace, even when shooting the genitals off Yellow Bastard. And Wood plays Kevin with both creepy evil and spiritual ecstacy. All without saying a word.

"Sin City" is a remarkable, bleak, intense movie -- a halfway point between Tarantino and Raymond Chandler. Outstanding.
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on June 27, 2016
After the first few minutes I was going to jump out of this film, but decided to abandon myself to the concept and see where it took me. Really glad I did that. Remember the old "true crime" detective novels? Sin City is a marriage of that genre with film noir, amplified a thousand times. It's goofy but gritty, well-cast and well-acted, both ludicrous and captivating. I've really never seen anything quite like it. Some movies are their own category because of their content, theme, execution, whatever. Brazil (1985, Terry Gilliam, director) and Blue Velvet (1986, David Lynch, director) are such films; so is Sin City.
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on October 6, 2012
>>> The header of this product is listed as DVD for some reason, despite being a review of a BD purchased via Amazon. Go Figure. >>>

Frank Miller is a favourite of mine, so I am pretty biased. The books the film is based upon cannot in the strictest term be called 'comics'. But this is heaped into the category of 'comic book film'. And you know what, for some reason that doesn't bother me.

Miller, who has always been known for shaking up our perceptions on the definitions of what can be expected in the comic book medium, stuck gold with this solid serialized title. With this film, director Robert Rodriguez redefined what a comic movie could be. And with this version of the BD, they both have redefined the comic book home experience.

Packed with featurettes, a sharp 5.1 soundtrack, snarky and witty commentary, and some 20 minutes of additional movie, there's not much to not like about Sin City at all. Hell, Rodriguez even puts a favourite recipe (apparently one that helped him get through the filming process) in the mix, a simple breakfast taco with homemade attentions- and I tried it; it is a simply divine way to spice up an early morning. How many other BDs, let alone DVDs, give you THAT kind of bonus features?

We know the count. Sin City was a highly regarded "neo-noir" TPB series and a highly praised film. Awards, all-star ensemble cast, lots of action, strong and sexy women, lots of action, gore, and lots of action. Frankly, if you are a fan of gritty comics at all and have no knowledge of Sin City and do not own a BD player... well, there's a good suggestion for your first two purchases.

It's dark, twisted, violent, and quite possibly one of my favourite films of all time.
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on February 9, 2016
Very interesting show and the "sets" costumes, and camera work were amazing, but after watching, I had to ask: "Why try to recreate a graphic novel in movie form?" I mean, if I wanted to read a graphic novel, I'd read a graphic novel. And that's exactly what I felt like I'd done after watching this. It was kinda weird.

A little too violent for my taste, but I suppose I should expect that. If you're looking for Jessica Alba nudity, fuggetaboutit, but Carla Gugino's boobs...omg....
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on July 29, 2016
Very dark, very grim. Shot in black and white. A GREAT film noir. If you're not familiar with that genre, you owe it to yourself to watch this!
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VINE VOICEon April 4, 2005
MOVIE: In an interview, Robert Rodriguez stated that instead of bringing the world of graphic novels to film, he wanted to bring film to the world of graphic novels. Boy, did he hit the nail on the head. Rodriguez has all the respect I can give to him because he is a conservative filmmaker who churns out epic products. His first film was made for $7K, and ever since he really tries to make movies for less. Rodriguez recently entered the world of digital filmmaking, his last film, Once Upon A Time In Mexico, was shot entirely in HD using digital cameras, no film. He raves about how easy it is to edit, just plug it into the computer and badabing! Sin City was shot all digital and it aided Rodriguez in accurately capturing Miller's vision. The movie uses three story lines from three seperate novels by Frank Miller. One is called "The Hard Goodbye", which follows a man's journey for revenge after a cannibal rapist who killed his one true love. The interesting part is that this one true love was a hooker that he spent the night with for the first time. Marv is played to perfection by Mickey Rourke and Elijah Wood is absolutely menacing as the cannibalistic killer. The second story is called "The Big Fat Kill", in where Dwight (Clive Owen) tries to protect the prostitutes of Basin City from a menacing sex starved guy but ends up sparking a war between the cops and the hookers who previously held a truce. Finally comes my favorite plot, "That Yellow Bastard". This is what noir is all about, the story of a cop coming to the end of his run trying to protect an innocent girl from a pedophile madman, he ends up framed for the crime and after 8 years in prison he sets out to protect the same girl only she's 19 now rather than 11. Everything was done entirely with chroma key (Green Screen), and since it was in black/white it didn't feel cartoonish like Star Wars did. Rodriguez uses light to highlight faces and shadows that make an incredible effect. The only colors in the movie are red, blue, and yellow, which are the primary colors. Green is used twice, and I'm trying to remember if they incorporated the fact that blue and yellow make green, but I can't remember, so maybe I'm just over analyzing with the green. The movie has a lot of personal narration from the characters, and it's not narration of what is going on plot-wise but rather their personal thoughts to the action that is happening. One great line from Bruce Willis is after punching his partner in the face he says to himself, "Hell of a way to end a partnership". Although the lines are sleazy and obvious at times you have to realize that the kind of dialogue used here is a trademark of the noir style. "That Yellow Bastard" was definately the best story of them all because it had emotion to it, "The Hard Goodbye" was great too mainly because of the character of Marv, and "The Big Fat Kill" had some shining moments too but trailed off the radar a few times. The only problem I had was that the narration in Marv's storyline dragged a bit, but overall Robert Rodriguez's talent in film combined with Frank Miller's talent in graphic novels makes one hell of a tribute to film noir. This is pure entertaining filmmaking at its best, it's all style and one hell of an experience.

ACTING/DIRECTING: Bruce Willis and Mickey Rourke shine in full glory. They couldn't have gotten any better actors for these roles. All the characters in a film noir are hard-boiled and cynical, and these two played it to perfection. The ensamble cast is endless and everyone was top notch except for Jaime King as Goldie/Wendy, she just can't act. As it goes for the artistic vision, well, does it really need explaining? I mean, brilliant use of shadows and light, using the primary colors only when something needs to be emphasized, and capturing emotion through the setting. One of my favorite scenes was when Bruce Willis' character was framed and in jail for 8 years, he first says that he is alone. The jail cell seems to be floating in an endless darkness, it's all black around the cell. Then comes Quentin Tarantino, who is really only being used as a marketing technique, but you can sense that disturbing Tarantino style and wit during the movie. Rodriguez and Tarantino are best buddies, and really I admire their admiration for classic films and film styles. Tarantino's Kill Bill films were tributes to Kurosawa and Leone, while Rodriguez's "El Mariachi" trilogy is a tribute to Leone's "Man with no name" trilogy. Anyway, Tarantino stopped on the set one day and Rodriguez wanted to show him the digital HD way of film, and let him direct this one scene where Clive Owen and Benicio Del Toro are in a car and Owen starts imagining things in his head.

BOTTOM LINE: Robert Rodriguez is the man. He gave up his DGA (Director's Guild of America) membership just so that he could have Frank Miller as a co-director, he really wanted Frank with him at all times so that they could get this one done perfect to Miller's standards. In his recent films if you pay attention to the credits you'll see Robert Rodriguez's name pop up several times. He does his own music, his editing, cinematography, writing, and directing. With Sin City he directed, did the music along with John Debney, and did the visual effects. He takes the workload to make it good, and he knows how to make it good, so I'm not gonna argue
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on August 10, 2016
A comic book comes to life in this film with a world-class cast of actors. I recommend it to everyone, even to those who are not really into comics.
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on April 1, 2017
A masterpiece! A great adaptation from one of the best comicbook sagas of the late 20th Century.
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on May 18, 2017
I love everything about this movie.....I'm happy with the seller, I would buy another one in the series if he had it.

Thanks

Marlyn Gibson
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